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  7. Nakanosawa Project / Ryo Yamada

Nakanosawa Project / Ryo Yamada

  • 23:00 - 22 March, 2015
Nakanosawa Project / Ryo Yamada
Nakanosawa Project / Ryo Yamada, © Yoshiaki Maezawa
© Yoshiaki Maezawa

© Yoshiaki Maezawa © Yoshiaki Maezawa © Yoshiaki Maezawa © Yoshiaki Maezawa +18

© Yoshiaki Maezawa
© Yoshiaki Maezawa

From the architect. If this house could speak, it would say, “I dream never to be completed.”

Japan’s snow covered northernmost region is where this house stands.  Since it is typical in midwinter for 5 meters of snow to pile up here, it was my priority to provide efficient heating inside this house when I designed it.  At the same time, I wanted to have the architectural purpose that creates an upscale and enjoyable time for the family who lives in it during a long winter.

© Yoshiaki Maezawa
© Yoshiaki Maezawa

This house longs to have an ever-evolving interior space.  The dream of never feeling complete describes its desire to adequately harmonize with the beautiful scenic views, the changes of the seasons, as well as each chapter in history of the family who calls it home. Talking of who change it, the client is me who is architect & environmental artist (self builder). The interior incompletion is client’s request. This house initial step completed at January 2015.

Section
Section

The pillars are installed at intervals of 1.82m.  The interval is the same as the Japanese traditional size in architecture called “ichi-ken” (the length of a tatami mat).  The length, “ichi-ken” is not only structurally sound, but is also the standard length of timbers produced in Japan. In fact, Most of the historical wooden buildings in Japan are constructed with these intervals. 

© Yoshiaki Maezawa
© Yoshiaki Maezawa

The diameter of the pillars is 105mm and is called “Sansun-gobu,” a Japanese traditional standard size.  The length from the floor to the top of the beam is 2.70m and is called “kyu-shaku”, which is also one of the Japanese traditional standard sizes in architecture.  In short, I designed this house based on Japanese traditional standard sizes in architecture.

Second Floor Plan
Second Floor Plan

It is possible to add tree houses inside this home utilizing the pillars and beams.  The inside look of the house transforms by adding or removing the tree houses with the changing outdoor sceneries viewed through the windows and each stage of the history of the family.  After all, this house & house’s client always dreams to stay incomplete.

© Yoshiaki Maezawa
© Yoshiaki Maezawa
Cite: "Nakanosawa Project / Ryo Yamada" 22 Mar 2015. ArchDaily. Accessed . <http://www.archdaily.com/611216/nakanosawa-project-ryo-yamada/>
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4 Comments

Matt U. · May 11, 2015

gotta love a section with a designated "treehouse" area

CarptonCode · March 23, 2015

Japanese houses are always terrifying for Americans. This one at least has a few scattered nets. I quite like it. And most times Japanese kids survive so it must be OK.

This house has inspired me to put a climbing wall to the kids' loft instead of a ladder.

B · March 23, 2015

I wish I lived in a house like this when I was young. Then again, I wish I live in it now! Great project. I hope to see how it transitions as the people in this house grow older.

Croco Dile · March 23, 2015

Good job, well done !

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