Villa Bussum / GROUP A

© Scagliola / Brakkee

Architect: GROUP A
Location: Bussum, Amsterdam
Client: Private
Contractor: Saam, Empe
Structures: K-Kostrukties, Rotterdam
Installations: Installatietechniek Coppens, Beverwijk
Site area: 1,450 sqm
Constructed area: 280 sqm
Year of enchargement: 2005
Construction Year: 2009
Photographs: Scagliola / Brakkee

This private residence for a family, completed in June 2009, is situated in a lush, leafy neighbourhood in Bussum, a small town near Amsterdam. The neighbourhood is known for its 19th century villas, designed in a vast array of revivalist styles. The design for the villa by is modern and sculptural and interacts in a natural way with its surroundings.

situation plan
elevation

By using slanting walls and roofs the abstract building volume plays by contrast with the neighbourhoods monumental, sometimes even frivolous 19th century villas. At the same time, the villa’s sculptural character ensures that it feels comfortably embedded in the landscape. Thus, the villa’s design enhances its integration with both context and community, yet outstanding by its singular language.

© Scagliola / Brakkee

The villa’s building type evolved from a simple rectangular volume with a rotated pitched roof. Subsequently, segments were cut from this volume in order to create windows, terraces, balconies and entrances. A cut-out corner facing the street in front of the house clearly indicates the main entrance, while on the eastern side of the villa, a secluded garden and a second entrance offer a more private side. A comfortable porch and a 15 meter wide panorama window face the garden at the back of the house, and double up as a transition between the villa and the garden.

© Scagliola / Brakkee

Both gardens in front and at the back of the house are linked to each other by a sloping path. This descending path lowers itself underneath the cantilevering block, thereby providing garden access for the basement floor, and a comfortable covered parking spot. The client asked for a villa with a modern feel, a garden with a high degree of privacy and the possibility of sheltered parking. By designing a cantilevering villa, positioned between the street and the private zone of the plot, all three of these demands were addressed. The design includes the answers to the demands, and integrates them through simple operations into a sculpted, modern and clear volume.

Cite: "Villa Bussum / GROUP A" 12 Jan 2010. ArchDaily. Accessed 16 Apr 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=46132>

17 comments

  1. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Why doesnt the cantilevered part of the house rest on the wall just besides it? Its just another 30cm. I somehow find it a frustating part of the building.

    I like the front facade, more then the backpart with the pitched roof.

    • Thumb up Thumb down 0

      We have the opposite opinion of the façades: I prefer the rear to the front.

      Now, with the cantilevered portion over the carport—

      “By using slanting walls and roofs the abstract building volume plays by contrast with the neighbourhoods monumental, sometimes even frivolous 19th century villas.”

      —speaking of frivolous!

  2. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    not sure i get the approach. it seems like mostly false cleverness. if you’re going to carve under the main mass for the car, it would seem that the goal would be to present to the street in a way less defiant of the historic context, or to avoid giving the car too big a role in consuming valuable site at grade. instead, the project seems to overly celebrate the flying corner over the driveway, and to eat up an inordinate amount of usable yard for frivolous car stacking.

  3. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    “Why doesnt the cantilevered part of the house rest on the wall just besides it? Its just another 30cm. I somehow find it a frustating part of the building.”

    Well with such a question you really don’t get it I suppose. The entire purpose of the cantilever is to NOT rest on the wall and let you experience this tension.

    • Thumb up Thumb down 0

      No, those 5 meters of cantilever are a way to stick your tongue out to gravity. Those 30cm are to show it wasnt necessary. I honestly think the gesture would be more powerfull with a greater distance.

  4. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    gorgos dont bother everyone…
    we all can see, you dont get it.
    but we get it, and the reason is your question about this 30cm!

    get it? i think not.

  5. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Ils n’ont pas fini d’être ennuyés par les architectes / photographes et curieux en tout genre qui voudront immortaliser ce gag architectural! Car ce n’est rien d’autre qu’un gag !

  6. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    it’s completely inconsequential if you “get it.” we’ve had the technology to achieve this kind of cantilever for almost a century. the idea that there’s tension or some slight of hand is just naive. my house floats over my driveway – awesome.

  7. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    Love the fact that the house looks quite ordinary and then cantilevers in that way. Totaly understand thoes 30 cm! Nice tension!

  8. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    I’m with Gorgos. It just looks a bit foolish thing to do. I understand what is is supposed to accomplish, but I think it misses the target and becomes annoying and unnecessary.

  9. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    As it is the cantilever looks a bit strange however it does create a bit of drama, perhaps the problem is the concrete wall looks so plain and doesn’t react to the cantilever or acknowledge it’s presence in any way. I prefer to look at the back of the house.

  10. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    This is rather ver modern. I like d concept, may just be a bit out of tune with other structures around it… well, that Architecture.

  11. Thumb up Thumb down 0

    The house was taken by a hurricane and dropped on this spot!
    In the near future they can dig a canal and place their boat where the car is..

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