Next Landmark 2013 Winners Announced

  • 24 Jul 2013
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  • Architecture News mini
Courtesy of Shoko Murakaji

Launched by Floornature, the winners of the second edition Next Landmark competition were just announced. Originality, environmental sustainability and all the ideas that exploit relations between people, architecture and landscape were the main determinants of the winning projects. For the first time, the 3 winning projects and the 6 special mentions were announced in a live streaming event conducted by anchor-architect, Pietro Polidori with the participation of all the big names on the judging panel. Next Landmark 2013 was an all-women edition, with two women winning first prize for the First Work and Research categories, Shoko Murakaji from Japan and the Russian, Nataly Abramova respectively. The first prize for the new Photography section went to the very young photographer and designer, Hugo Soo from Canada. More images and information on the winning projects after the break.

Courtesy of Shoko Murakaji

Winner: First Work Category
Villa921, Shoko Murakaji, Japan

Living on Iriomote-Island means to return to the fundamental basics of life. With an area of over 90% covered by subtropical virgin forest, 
the entire island is designated as a national park. The site being of generous dimensions had no need of a roof terrace. Leaving out the rain gutter, the gabled roof lets the rain water run over the facade to wash away accumulating salt crystals. The west side of the house opens up to the beautiful landscape. Wide eaves protect against the sun, which is five times stronger than on the main island. The spacious terrace is also used to wash and dry agricultural tools. Wooden sliding doors close the house against the typhoon, a wind that can last several days. Embedded in the surrounding area stands a little house for a simple life.

Courtesy of Nataly Abramova

Winner: Research Category
Contemporary Art Center: From Collecting to Creation, Nataly Abramova, Russia

The goal of the research is to identify the architectural features of modern architectural shaping, spatial organization and functional program 
of Contemporary Art Center buildings in the context of their historical and social evolution. The author made a comparative analysis of the declared goals for design of Contemporary Art Center and their implementation. As a result it can be said that today architectural space and architectural form of typology’s object are the main purpose for architectural design and they are the main exhibition of themselves of any Contemporary Art Center. It demonstrates the crisis of contemporary art, insignificance of art projects that are produced in large quantities, and the artist’s role in society.

Courtesy of Hugo Soo

Winner: Photography Category
Relationship Between Time, Architecture and Human Emotions, Hugo Soo, China

Landmark, as being a prominent or conspicuous object associated with historical, aesthetic or cultural values, it is often declared and given a special status (landmark designation) ordaining its preservation, by some authorizing organization. The idea of the ‘Next’ Landmark, as opposed to the ‘New’ Landmark, will re-examine the relationship between time and architecture with respect to the intricate human emotions through a series of photography work.

Courtesy of Giorgi Khmaladze

Mentioned Projects: First Work Category

Fuel Station and McDonald’s in Batumi, Giorgi Khmaladze, Georgia

Located in the centre of the 
newly urbanized parts of Batumi, this project includes a fuel stat ion, McDonald’s, recreational spaces and a reflective pool, all in a one volume solution characterized by continuity between spaces assuring a total privacy for the different kind of customers.

Courtesy of Michiya Tsukano

House T, Michiya Tsukano, Japan

This scheme has been planned 
to contrast the traffic noise of Miyazaki, in Southern Japan. The white plate that surrounds the building protects it from the outer crowdedness but allows the sunlight to enter the courtyard, allowing the inner the space to become warm and brighter.

Courtesy of Aries Cheng

Mentioned Projects: Research Category

Healing & Transformation: The ‘No Man’s Land’, Aries Cheng, Hong Kong

‘No man’s land’ is a study that 
takes its inspiration from Berlin, with its past and present history. This thesis is based on the importance of Berlin’s many “blanks” and offers some suggestions on how to deal with the further development of this unique metropolis.

Courtesy of Gabrielle Phillips

Antarctic Connections, Gabrielle Phillips, Australia

This is a transition point that would facilitate links between the Antarctic and the sites of physical placement at the end of Sullivans Cove in Hobart docks. A combination of public engagement and celebration, the project is conceived as a space that is both civic and allegorical.

Courtesy of Pedro Gabriel

Mentioned Projects: Photography Category

‘House of the Histories’ in Cascais, Pedro Gabriel, Portugal

A photographic study that 
emphasizes the harmony between the building designed by Eduardo Souto de Moura and the natural environment of the surrounding beautiful park, which makes this recent project (2008) a classic architecture.

Courtesy of Marco Fogarolo

Suburban, Marco Fogarolo, Italy

A research for images on the 
outskirts of the Venetian author’s city. Not a story, not a documentary, but a analysis on the spaces, shapes, volumes that asks itself what really we can consider as a landmark and that tries to give an identity to “Sub-urban” spaces.

The winners of the First Work and Photography categories receive a trip for two to Helsinki, for 3 nights, during Helsinki Design Week, and the winner of the Research category will receive a 3-month internship at BNKR, Mexico City. All the winning projects and special mentions for each category will also be displayed in the contest Exhibition held at SpazioFMG in Milan from October 2-11, 2013.

For more information on the competition and the winning projects, please visit here.

Cite: Furuto, Alison. "Next Landmark 2013 Winners Announced" 24 Jul 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 01 Sep 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=406312>

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