Barranco No. 436 / JSª

  • 07 Jul 2013
  • Housing Selected Works
© Sebastián Castillo

Architects: JSª
Location: Barranco, , Perú
Team: Javier Sánchez, Irvine Torres, Francisco de la Concha, Eduardo Zambrano
Area: 540 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Sebastián Castillo

© Sebastián Castillo

Located in the picturesque district of Barranco in Lima, Peru, the project Barranco 436 is located in a characteristic topographic edge of the area, facing a public space and with a privileged view of the seascape. The site is 120 square meters and is characterized by its triangular shape, 9 meters wide at the front and 3 meters wide at the back. We designed the project on 70% of the area of the site, on 4 levels with the height allowed by the zoning parameters. The volume is divided into two bodies that programmatically separate the public-private relations from the 3 apartments, and in which there is one apartment per floor. An art studio-gallery is designed on the ground floor, which belongs to the apartment on the first level.

© Sebastián Castillo

The volume consists of two bodies joined by a bridge-library that spans a height difference of 85 cm, joining the public areas with the private spaces and generating a mezzanine 3.75 m high in the back space of the gallery. Since the site is elongated, the public spaces are laid out towards the main facade, articulating random terraces on the front volume, generating corners that reinforce the relationship with the landscape. The 3 parking spaces required are designed by means of a car elevator, avoiding sacrificing the street level with parking lots and giving a greater urban meaning to the intervention. This is a compact project designed to achieve the full use of spaces, views, and livability; trying to reassess and spread the regeneration of the district.

Section D

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* Location to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address.
Cite: "Barranco No. 436 / JSª" 07 Jul 2013. ArchDaily. Accessed 30 Aug 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=395772>

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