The Courtyard House / Hiren Patel Architects

  • 09 Nov 2012
  • Houses Selected Works
© Sebastian Zachariah

Architects: Hiren Patel Architects
Location: Ahmedabad, Gujarat,
Area: 245 sqm
Year: 2011
Photographs: Sebastian Zachariah

© Sebastian Zachariah

The courtyard house is designed with a grid of 7’x7’. The house has been designed in such a way hat all the living spaces and passage face open space and garden, which was also the main design concept since its inception, thus creating a central courtyard which holds the reflection pool making it a major design element. This also makes the design an introvert one, leaving garden at backside but still visible and accessible from all the rooms of house.

© Sebastian Zachariah

Formal living room comes first along with 2 bedrooms followed by 9’ wide passage parallel to central courtyard and reflection pool. Passage ends to dining room and family room. This area is maximum used area, thus has a big verandah all three sides, which adds the value to north side garden.

© Sebastian Zachariah

This house has big size of openings and skylight to allow ample amount of light to be entered in house throughout the day. It is also a crucial feature in Ahmedabad climate. Here light is essential but not a scorching heat. Screens and deep verandah protect these huge openings from harsh Sun. Verandahs also become wonderful outdoors spaces during relatively cool evenings and mornings.

Section & Elevation

Courtyard House is made of RCC roof structure covered with wood. Also verandah and upper rooms are covered with wood. Floors are covered with natural marble stone & wooden planks. Custom designed doors and windows are made of wood and laminated glass.

Plan

Basic principles of Architecture have been applied to the house and use of art & art-objects make the spaces of ‘timeless’ quality.

Architecture, Interior & Landscape Design is done by HPA, thus synchronized well with each other.

Cite: "The Courtyard House / Hiren Patel Architects" 09 Nov 2012. ArchDaily. Accessed 30 Aug 2014. <http://www.archdaily.com/?p=291794>

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