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Women In Architecture: The Latest Architecture and News

Women in Architecture Photography: 12 Names to Know

05:00 - 12 February, 2019
Women in Architecture Photography: 12 Names to Know, © Leana Cagnotto
© Leana Cagnotto

In many parts of the world, more women have architectural degrees than men. However, this fact hasn’t translated past university into the working world as women continue to be underrepresented across nearly all levels of practice.

The conversation regarding women in architecture gained tremendous traction back in 2013 with the petition for Denise Scott Brown to be recognized as the 1991 Pritzker Prize winner, alongside her husband and the consequent rejection of that request by Pritzker. The Architectural Review and Architect's Journal have, since 2015, jointly presented awards to the exceptional female practitioners as part of their Women in Architecture Awards program. The swelling of these movements have helped to promote not only the role but also the recognition of women in architecture.

9 Lessons For Post-Architecture-School Survival

05:00 - 4 February, 2019

We’ve already talked about this. You’re preparing your final project (or thesis project). You’ve gone over everything in your head a thousand times; the presentation to the panel, your project, your model, your memory, your words. You go ahead with it, but think you'll be lousy. Then you think just the opposite, you will be successful and it will all be worth it. Then everything repeats itself and you want to call it quits.  You don’t know when this roller coaster is going to end. 

Until the day arrives. You present your project. Explain your ideas. The committee asks you questions. You answer. You realize you know more than you thought you did and that none of the scenarios you imaged over the past year got even close to what really happened in the exam. The committee whisper amongst themselves. The presentation ends and they ask you to leave for a while. Outside you wait an eternity, the minutes crawling slowly. Come in, please. The commission recites a brief introduction and you can’t tell whether you were right or wrong. The commission gets to the point.

You passed! Congratulations, you are now their new colleague and they all congratulate you on your achievement. The joy washes over you despite the fatigue that you’ve dragging around with you. The adrenaline stops pumping. You spend weeks or months taking a much-deserved break. You begin to wonder: Now what?

The university, the institution that molded you into a professional (perhaps even more so than you would have liked), hands you the diploma and now you face the job market for the first time (that is if you haven’t worked before). Before leaving and defining your own markers for personal success (success is no longer measured with grades or academic evaluations), we share 9 lessons to face the world now that you're an architect.

Liz Diller and Helene Binet Recognised in 2019 Women in Architecture Awards

05:00 - 29 January, 2019
Courtesy of The Architect's Journal
Courtesy of The Architect's Journal

Architect Liz Diller and architectural photographer Hélène Binet have been awarded the 2019 Jane Drew and Ada Louise Huxtable Prizes, respectively, for their exceptional contributions to the field of architecture. The prizes are part of the eighth edition of the Women in Architecture Awards founded jointly by The Architect's Journal and The Architectural Review.

A room of one’s own: Feminist questions about architecture

01:30 - 29 January, 2019
A room of one’s own: Feminist questions about architecture

A room of one’s own: Feminist questions about architecture

A room and money of her own – these are two prerequisites for a woman’s self-fulfilment, so wrote Virginia Woolf almost 90 years ago. Despite this, Estonian architectural culture still seems to be completely unaware of the fact that space can also be a feminist issue. Yet feminism provides a methodology and approach that allows us to raise a wide range of questions and to see the history of Estonian architecture in the 20th century as well as contemporary practices and ways of using space in a completely different light. That

Material and Immaterial Poetry: The Work of Lina Bo Bardi

09:30 - 5 January, 2019
Material and Immaterial Poetry: The Work of Lina Bo Bardi, Facade - Valéria Cirell House. Image © Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi.
Facade - Valéria Cirell House. Image © Instituto Lina Bo e P.M. Bardi.

Italian-born architect Lina Bo Bardi is one of the most important figures of Brazilian design. Her ability to blend architecture, politics and popular culture made her an icon throughout the country and world, while her relentlessness to break from traditionalisms made Brazil the ideal location for her work.

Bo Bardi's architecture incorporates both materiality and culture. In addition to the concrete and solidified elements, she designed pieces based on cultural factors and intense political discussions. She wished to break the barriers between intellectuals and everyday people.

Intruders in the Boys' Club: Women Redefining Success in Architecture

07:30 - 22 December, 2018
Intruders in the Boys' Club: Women Redefining Success in Architecture, via Alexandra Lange
via Alexandra Lange

Whether it be the overly-dainty posture of scale model figures or the assumptions of being the in-house decorator, the portrayal of women in architecture is often one of subservience. Despite Despina Stratigakos' hands-on efforts behind Architect Barbie or the global impacts of the legacy of starchitect Zaha Hadid, there continues to be a lack of visibility of women in the profession.

In a recent article in the New York Times, writer Allison Arieff poses the echoed question that the architectural community keeps asking itself, "Where are all the female architects?" No longer an issue of uneven gender ratios in architectural schooling, the persistence of dwindling numbers of women principals at the top of firms simply does not resonate. She postulates, that perhaps more significant than the statistics, the real problem lies in the definition of success.

Liz Ogbu Zaha Hadid Amale Andraos Jeanne Gang + 5

An Introduction to Seven Influential and Innovative Women of the Bauhaus

05:00 - 26 November, 2018
An Introduction to Seven Influential and Innovative Women of the Bauhaus, © Gertrud Arndt, Bauhaus Archive, Berlin
© Gertrud Arndt, Bauhaus Archive, Berlin

Gropius, Mies van der Rohe, Albers, Klee, and Breuer are all names that bring to mind the exceptional artistic talent of the Bauhaus school. But an exceptional yet lesser-known aspect of the Bauhaus is that the early 20th-century experimental German art school was one of the first educational institutions that would openly accept qualified women into the program.

Once entered into the program, women were not exactly treated as equals to their male peers, but in 1919 the acceptance of these passionate women was the beginning of a wave of modern female artisans who made significant, yet not as recognized contributions to the Bauhaus movement. An introduction to seven of these women can be found below:

The Often Forgotten Work of Denise Scott Brown

08:00 - 5 June, 2018
The Often Forgotten Work of Denise Scott Brown, Courtesy of Robert Venturi
Courtesy of Robert Venturi

There’s something irresistible about Robert Venturi and Denise Scott Brown’s architectural romance. They met when they were both young professors at the University of Pennsylvania; Scott Brown held seminars in city planning, and Venturi gave lectures in architectural theory. As the story goes, Scott Brown argued in her first faculty meeting that Frank Furness’ masterful Venetian gothic library should not be torn down to build a plaza (then a dissenting opinion). Venturi approached her after the meeting, offering his support. As Paul Goldberger wrote of the couple in 1971, “as their esthetic viewpoints grew closer and closer, so did their feelings toward each other.” Architecture lovers can’t help but love the architect-lovers.

What It’s Like to be an Architect who Doesn’t Design Buildings

06:00 - 6 April, 2018
What It’s Like to be an Architect who Doesn’t Design Buildings, Han Zhang along with her team at <a href="http://www.archdaily.cn">ArchDaily China</a>. Image Courtesy of Han Zhang
Han Zhang along with her team at ArchDaily China. Image Courtesy of Han Zhang

There's an old, weary tune that people sing to caution against being an architect: the long years of academic training, the studio work that takes away from sleep, and the small job market in which too many people are vying for the same positions. When you finally get going, the work is trying as well. Many spend months or even years working on the computer and doing models before seeing any of the designs become concrete. If you're talking about the grind, architects know this well enough from their training, and this time of ceaseless endeavor in the workplace only adds to that despair.

Which is why more and more architects are branching out. Better hours, more interesting opportunities, and a chance to do more than just build models. Furthermore, the skills you learn as an architect, such as being sensitive to space, and being able to grasp the cultural and societal demands of a place, can be put to use in rather interesting ways. Here, 3 editors at ArchDaily talk about being an architect, why they stopped designing buildings, and what they do in their work now. 

Celebrating A Generation of Women Leaders in Architectural Practices Around the World

16:00 - 3 April, 2018
Celebrating A Generation of Women Leaders in Architectural Practices Around the World

"Where are the women architects?" Despina Stratigakos, an architectural historian and professor, lamented in her book about women in the practice. (She even titled her book that very question.) The sentiment was certainly a resounding one, well-understood by many women who have worked in the profession and had to break through a male citadel. We know the number of women in architecture is small, and it gets smaller the higher up we look. 

Which is why we wanted to recognize the women who are at the top, leading practices, and paving the way. To celebrate International Women's Day this month, we launched an open call to recognize women who run their own firms all around the world. And if their projects had never been published by us before, we were going to give them the spotlight.

What we found were an incredible group of women who impressed us with their designs, their work ethic, and their dedication towards the profession. Not only do these women design and build, but they lead teams, manage offices, and eventually took the leap to be their own bosses and do things their own way. 

Why Does The Gender Pay Gap Issue Make People Uncomfortable?

06:00 - 19 March, 2018
Why Does The Gender Pay Gap Issue Make People Uncomfortable?, Foster + Partners' London office, Riverside. Image © Marc Goodwin
Foster + Partners' London office, Riverside. Image © Marc Goodwin

Last week, ArchDaily covered a story about the gender pay gap at Foster + Partners. We thought such a story was "unsurprising" given that the gender pay gap is something that is widely reported on, and present in almost every industry, and we wanted to share a case of it happening in an architectural firm many of us are familiar with. What we did not expect was that readers would think it is a non-issue, or that such reporting was sensational. Is it possible for us to talk about gender in the workplace without being up in arms? Why does the gender pay gap issue make people uncomfortable?

Some of our editors discussed how gender plays into their workplace experiences as well as some hopeful recent signs that we are on a path to change.

Contemporary Architecture Captured by Mexican Photographers

08:00 - 17 March, 2018
via Portada
via Portada

The history of Mexican photography has contributed to highlighting Mexico's presence in the world. Photographers like Elsa Medina, Lola Álvarez Bravo, Graciela Iturbide, Maya Goded, and Juan Rulfo have masterfully portrayed the life of the buildings, houses and the streets of a rapidly built, nineteenth-century Mexico. 

As a consequence, the contemporary scene of Mexican photography has become a fundamental tool for architecture and has contributed to a better visual understanding of the works that are erected every day.

Photography and architecture are two disciplines that go hand in hand and whose relationship has been reinforced thanks to the digital tools that we currently have. For that reason, we have compiled the work of contemporary Mexican photographers who record our walk through the world we live in and contribute to constructing the image of contemporary Mexico. 

Richard Meier Accused of Sexual Harassment by 5 Women; Temporarily Steps Down from Firm

14:28 - 13 March, 2018
Richard Meier Accused of Sexual Harassment by 5 Women; Temporarily Steps Down from Firm, By <a rel="nofollow" href="http://blog.shankbone.org">David Shankbone</a> - <a rel="nofollow" href="http://blog.shankbone.org">David Shankbone</a>, <a href="http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0">CC BY 3.0</a>, <a href="https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=6792098">Link</a>
By David Shankbone - David Shankbone, CC BY 3.0, Link

The New York Times has detailed accusations of sexual harassment made by five women against architect Richard Meier. The allegations have been made by four women who have worked with Mr. Meier, including two women describing incidents which have occurred over the last ten years. A fifth woman, who did not work at the firm, details an incident with Mr. Meier in the 1980s.

In response to the allegations put to Mr. Meier by the New York Times, the 83-year-old architect has said he will take a six-month leave of absence from his firm, and issued the following statement:"I am deeply troubled and embarrassed by the accounts of several women who were offended by my words and actions. While our recollections may differ, I sincerely apologize to anyone who was offended by my behavior."

Help Us Recognize the Women that are Shaping Architecture Around the World

08:00 - 8 March, 2018
Help Us Recognize the Women that are Shaping Architecture Around the World, © Danae Santibañez
© Danae Santibañez

At ArchDaily we want to see more women showing their projects to the world and receiving the recognition they deserve for their work. Today, we celebrate International Women’s Day and, with the help of our readers, we want to continue to give visibility to the valuable contribution made every day to the field of architecture by millions of colleagues.

There’s a Gender Pay Gap at Foster + Partners (Unsurprisingly)

16:00 - 7 March, 2018
There’s a Gender Pay Gap at Foster + Partners (Unsurprisingly), Foster + Partners' London office, Riverside. Image © Marc Goodwin
Foster + Partners' London office, Riverside. Image © Marc Goodwin

Disparity between men and women in the workplace has long been cause for concern, both within the architectural profession and beyond. To raise awareness of the need for gender pay equality, the British government in 2017 demanded that UK-based organizations with more than 250 staff publish annual reports of the gender pay gap within their offices.

As one of the largest architecture firms in the world, and based in Battersea, London, Foster + Partners has released their report into gender pay issues, becoming one of the first architecture firms to do so. The report reveals significant under-representation of women at senior level resulting in a pay gap across the firm, and outlines a commitment to encouraging gender diversity at all levels of management.

South American Architects Sandra Barclay and Gloria Cabral Win 2018 Women in Architecture Awards

11:30 - 2 March, 2018
South American Architects Sandra Barclay and Gloria Cabral Win 2018 Women in Architecture Awards, Site Museum of Paracas Culture / Barclay & Crousse. Courtesy of Barclay & Crousse. Image
Site Museum of Paracas Culture / Barclay & Crousse. Courtesy of Barclay & Crousse. Image

Two South American architects have been selected as the winners of The Architectural Review and The Architects’ Journal’s 2018 Women in Architecture awards. This year’s top prize, Architect of the Year, has been awarded to Peruvian architect Sandra Barclay, while Paraguayan architect Gloria Cabral has been selected as the winner of the Moira Gemmill Prize for Emerging Architecture, with both being recognized by the jury for their mastery of materials.

The 9 Architecture Topics You Need To Know About in 2018

08:00 - 26 February, 2018
The 9 Architecture Topics You Need To Know About in 2018 , 097 • Yojigen Poketto / elii © Imagen Subliminal
097 • Yojigen Poketto / elii © Imagen Subliminal

2017 is in the past. Nevertheless, the year has left us a series of lessons, new wisdom and better tools to help us face the challenges of 2018. What surprises will this year bring us?

We asked our editors at Plataforma Arquitectura (ArchDaily's Spanish arm) to make predictions based on what they've learnt in 2017, and to share with readers the topics they expect to be in the limelight in 2018.

12 Women in Architecture Photography (Part 2)

08:00 - 20 February, 2018
12 Women in Architecture Photography (Part 2), © Ema Peter
© Ema Peter

Is there an aspect, a recurring mark, that reveals a difference in the way that male and female architecture photographers see the world? This is, perhaps, one of those rhetorical questions often used as an argument to shed light on works produced by women and for which there is no precise answer.

Without claiming to offer an answer to this question—and in order to follow up on our first article that showcased a selection of women in architecture photography—we present here a new compilation of professionals who deserve attention for the quality of their photographic work. See our list below: