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Carlo Ratti's Writing Robot Transforms Your Wall into an Artistic Canvas

12:00 - 6 April, 2018
 Carlo Ratti's Writing Robot Transforms Your Wall into an Artistic Canvas, Courtesy of Gary di Silvio and Giacomo Mangia
Courtesy of Gary di Silvio and Giacomo Mangia

Carlo Ratti Associati (CRA) has unveiled Scribit, a “writing robot” which draws images and text on any wall surface, turning office, living, and bathroom walls into a blank canvas for artistic expression. Using in-built engines, Scribit can draw, cancel, and re-draw new content an infinite number of times, allowing users to print different images, messages, or feeds every day.

Scribit is always connected to the internet, allowing users to download, upload or source any online content. Operating in real time, Scribit immediately reproduces any data sent to it by the user, be it a restaurant posting the day’s menu, a financial firm posting stock market updates in its lobby, or an art enthusiast projecting their own content on the living room wall.

Courtesy of Gary di Silvio and Giacomo Mangia Courtesy of Gary di Silvio and Giacomo Mangia Courtesy of Gary di Silvio and Giacomo Mangia Courtesy of Gary di Silvio and Giacomo Mangia + 8

Local Computations

09:30 - 5 April, 2018
Local Computations, Local computations
Local computations

This issue of dearq seeks to shed light on a spectrum of spatial, material, and research practices intertwining architecture, design, and computation. We welcome contributions that address these from critical, de-colonial, and local perspectives, with a non-exclusive focus on Latin America and the rest of the “Global South”.

Recent debates on the role of computation in architectural practice and education tend to be framed within theoretical armatures that originate in the global centers of knowledge and economy. Likewise, dominant discourses on computation in architecture and design often normalize technologies
as autonomous forces that trigger inextricable historical ‘turns.’ It is thus tempting, but

Laka Competition 2018: “Architecture that Reacts”

08:00 - 5 April, 2018
Laka Competition 2018: “Architecture that Reacts”, "Currents for Currents" by Deo Alrashid Trevecedo Alam, Pierre Michael Monjardin, Andrew Galano
"Currents for Currents" by Deo Alrashid Trevecedo Alam, Pierre Michael Monjardin, Andrew Galano

About Laka Competition 2018:

Laka invites designers from around the world to submit their ideas of ‘architecture that reacts.’ The main focus of the competition is on the solutions that develop through a process of changes and adjustments. The subject of the competition is architectural, design, or technological solutions that are capable of dynamic interaction with their surroundings. https://lakareacts.com/competition-2018/


International Jury:

Alberto T. Estévez (Architect, Educator, Art Historian, Ph.D. of Sciences, Ph.D. of Arts, Founder of ESARQ/UIC) http://albertoestevez.es/
Ana Rewakowicz (Artist, Inventor, Designer) http://rewana.com
Dagmar Reinhardt (Ph.D., Architect, Educator, Principal of reinhardtjung) http://www.reinhardtjung.de | http://www.robarch2016.org
Hani Rashid (Architect, Designer, Educator, Co-founder of Asymptote, Head of Studio_Hani

What is BIM and Why Does it Seem to be Fundamental in the Current Architectural Design?

08:00 - 10 March, 2018
What is BIM and Why Does it Seem to be Fundamental in the Current Architectural Design?, Cortesía de Gonzalo De la Parra
Cortesía de Gonzalo De la Parra

BIM (Building Information Modeling) is a methodology that allows architects to create digital design simulations to manage all the information associated with an architectural project.

While CAD creates 2- or 3-dimensional drawings that don't distinguish between their elements, BIM incorporates 4-D (time) and 5-D (costs). This allows users to manage information intelligently throughout the life cycle of a project, automating processes such as programming, conceptual design, detailed design, analysis, documentation, manufacturing, construction logistics, operation and maintenance, renovation and/or demolition. 

In any design and construction project there are an unlimited number of participants, as well as infinite interactions between parties. The projects are multidisciplinary and include information that is not necessary to all involved. So who is responsible for what in each project? How far does my responsibility go and where does yours start? BIM helps to order the complexity of this process. 

Trespa Meteon cladding, modeled in Revit What is BIM and Why Does it Seem to be Fundamental in the Current Architectural Design? Trespa Meteon cladding, modeled in Revit Trespa Meteon cladding, modeled in Revit + 7

ARCHITECT's 12th Annual R+D Awards

14:22 - 7 March, 2018
ARCHITECT's 12th Annual R+D Awards

ARCHITECT magazine is now accepting entries for its 12th Annual R+D Awards! We would be grateful if you could share the competition details below with your network. The winners will published in ARCHITECT’s July 2018 issue and on our website. As with previous years, full-time students and faculty are eligible for a reduced registration fee!

Will Carbon Fiber Revolutionize Architecture as Steel Did in the 19th Century?

09:30 - 5 March, 2018
Will Carbon Fiber Revolutionize Architecture as Steel Did in the 19th Century?, Carbon fiber's light weight and unique properties make it an exciting potential building material, say researchers at Autodesk BUILD Space. Image Courtesy of University of Stuttgart
Carbon fiber's light weight and unique properties make it an exciting potential building material, say researchers at Autodesk BUILD Space. Image Courtesy of University of Stuttgart

This article was originally published by Autodesk's Redshift publication as "Could Carbon Fiber Be the Superhero of Building Materials?"

On any weekday, Chicago’s downtown business district, the Loop, teems with harried humans crossing the street like herds of wild antelope fleeing a predator. Most scurry past the Field Building without considering its significance—or that of the historic building demolished in 1931 on the same site: the Home Insurance Building. Built in 1884, it was the first tall building erected on a frame made of structural steel—a light, affordable, and durable material that allowed structures to be built taller, stronger, and faster than those made of wood or stone.

The Future of Housing: Drones, Automation and Co-Habitation

08:00 - 28 February, 2018
The Future of Housing: Drones, Automation and Co-Habitation, via Humphreys & Partners Architects
via Humphreys & Partners Architects

Humphreys and Partners, a Dallas-based architecture firm, presented a vision of future residential living at the 2018 International Builders’ Show earlier this year. Tackling current issues of affordable housingsustainable design and how technology is changing the way we live, their futuristic vision Pier 2: Apartment of the Future consists of two soaring skyscrapers on the Manhattan waterfront. 

via Humphreys & Partners Architects via Humphreys & Partners Architects via Humphreys & Partners Architects via Humphreys & Partners Architects + 6

Futuristic Illustrations Show What Architecture and Construction Will Look Like in 2030

08:00 - 18 February, 2018
Futuristic Illustrations Show What Architecture and Construction Will Look Like in 2030, via MIT Technology Review
via MIT Technology Review

In a world where technology is at the forefront of our lives, it’s hard to imagine that many of the jobs that are available now did not exist 10 years ago; uber drivers, social media managers, app developers and even the job of an ArchDaily writer would have seemed an abstract concept! As technology advances further, even more job positions will be created and others left behind, leaving it open to speculation as to what will come next.

It is almost impossible to predict the future, but digital agency AKQA and Mish Global have attempted the impossible and envisioned several potential jobs in the design and construction industry in 2030 following inspiration from several panels they attended at the World Economic Forum. With the speed of changes over the last decade, they don’t seem too far from reality either.

How To Create An Architecture Portfolio in Virtual Reality

08:00 - 11 February, 2018
How To Create An Architecture Portfolio in Virtual Reality, Cortesía de SentioVR
Cortesía de SentioVR

A portfolio is the standard way for architects to show their work  and their style, process and brand. Over the last decade, portfolios have evolved from paper to digital, primarily because it is more time and cost efficient to maintain a digital portfolio and keep it up-to-date.

Within the realm of digital portfolios, choices can range between an app, a PDF, to a web-hosted portfolio. Architects usually choose to use JPEGs as the main element of the portfolio and may add text or other digital media like video or audio.

However, with the increasing use of new technologies like Virtual Reality to present architectural work - there is a strong case for creating and maintaining an immersive VR portfolio of your work to differentiate your brand in front of your audience and embrace newer technologies.

How To Be a Tech-Savvy Architect

09:30 - 5 February, 2018
How To Be a Tech-Savvy Architect, © Andrea Vasquez
© Andrea Vasquez

Architecture is a collaborative discipline, where a day’s work often involves sharing files, emails, and information in the process of completing a project. Whether you are entering competitionsapplying for jobs or getting your work published, being tech-savvy when sharing files is a crucial skill to have—while failing to be tech-savvy can lead to frustrated colleagues, wasted time, and even missed career opportunities.

To help you ensure you're not making any mistakes, we’ve put together a few pointers you can use to share work online more efficiently and effectively.

Call for Papers: TAW 2018 International Scientific Conference

17:01 - 17 January, 2018
Call for Papers: TAW 2018 International Scientific Conference

An integral and substantial component of TAW 2018, the International Scientific Conference aims at exploring contemporary research activities and design tactics that deal with the topic of co-habitation from different perspectives and within different fields of interest, directly or indirectly related to architecture, city, and landscape. Through the observation of different tactics adopted by researchers and professionals, the hope is to identify new research and design trajectories.

Call for Papers: TAW 2018 International Scientific Conference | Co-habitation Tactics I Imagining future spaces in architecture, city and landscape

12:32 - 17 January, 2018
Call for Papers: TAW 2018 International Scientific Conference | Co-habitation Tactics I Imagining future spaces in architecture, city and landscape, POLIS University
POLIS University

The International Scientific Conference aims at exploring contemporary research activities and design tactics that deal with the topic of co-habitation from different perspectives and within different fields of interest, directly or indirectly related to architecture, city, and landscape.

How Drones Can Be Used in Architecture (And How To Use Them Without Breaking the Law)

09:30 - 10 January, 2018
How Drones Can Be Used in Architecture (And How To Use Them Without Breaking the Law), © <a href='https://unsplash.com/photos/DiTiYQx0mh4'>Dose Media on Unsplash</a>
© Dose Media on Unsplash

This article was originally published by Archipreneur as "How Drones Can Be Used in Architecture."

Small unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), commonly called drones, are gaining in popularity not only among the general public and consumers, but also among professionals working in the AEC industry. We’ve seen ambitious predictions for the use of drones on construction sites, as transportation vehicles and marketing tools.

While this new technology, like 3D printing and robotic fabrication in general, promises to revolutionize the architectural profession, it is useful to know to what extent its practical application can affect the way archipreneurs work. It seems that, for now, drones have great potentials when it comes to several aspects of the profession.

5 Emerging Careers in Architecture Technology to Look Out for in 2018 and Beyond

09:30 - 4 January, 2018
5 Emerging Careers in Architecture Technology to Look Out for in 2018 and Beyond, Composite based on images by Pixabay users <a href='https://pixabay.com/en/building-reflection-window-glass-922529/'>LenaSevcikova</a> and <a href='https://pixabay.com/en/man-virtual-reality-samsung-gear-vr-1416140/'>HammerandTusk</a>
Composite based on images by Pixabay users LenaSevcikova and HammerandTusk

Even with tech like virtual reality, augmented reality, 3D printing, computational design and robotics already reshaping architecture practice, the design community is just scratching the surface of the potential of new technologies. Designers who recognize this and invest in building skills and expertise to maximize the use of these tools in the future will inherently become better architects, and position themselves for entirely new career paths as our profession evolves. It is a uniquely exciting moment for architecture to advance through innovative use of technology. Even just a decade ago, designers with interests in both architecture and technology were essentially required to pursue one or the other. Now, with architecture beginning to harness the power of cutting-edge technologies, these fields are no longer mutually exclusive. Rather than choose a preferred path, today’s architects are encouraged to embrace technology to become sought-out talent.

With much written about how technology is changing the way architects work and the products we can deliver to clients during a project’s lifecycle, there has been less focus on how technology is changing career opportunities in the profession. Architecture companies are now hiring roles that didn’t exist even three years ago. Here’s a look at five emerging career paths design technology will make possible in 2018 and the immediate future.

Visionary Master Plan Wins Smart City Prize At World Architecture Festival

16:00 - 9 December, 2017
Visionary Master Plan Wins Smart City Prize At World Architecture Festival, via SHAU Architects
via SHAU Architects

Due to rapid population and economic growth, Indonesia is facing issues such as land subsidence and rising sea levels. To combat these problems and more, SHAU Architects created a master plan for the Jakarta Jaya Foundation focused on large-scale land reclamation to integrate green space. By addressing impending challenges, SHAU Architects proposal, Jakarta Jaya: the Green Manhattan, won a Smart Cities prize at the World Architecture Festival 2017. 

From Smartphones to Smart Cities: What Happens When We Try to Solve Every Problem With Technology?

09:30 - 30 November, 2017
From Smartphones to Smart Cities: What Happens When We Try to Solve Every Problem With Technology?, Songdo in South Korea is perhaps the most complete realization yet of the smart city concept. Image Courtesy of Cisco
Songdo in South Korea is perhaps the most complete realization yet of the smart city concept. Image Courtesy of Cisco

In order to be successful in any field, professionals must stay ahead of the curve—though in architecture nowadays, technology progresses so quickly that it’s difficult to be on the front lines. Virtual Reality can transport architects and their clients into unbuilt designs and foreign lands. Smart Cities implement a network of information and communication technologies to conserve resources and simplify everyday life. Responsive Design will give buildings the ability to be an extension of the human body by sensing occupants' needs and responding to them.

With the technology boom, if architects want to stay in the game they will inevitably have to work alongside not only techies but scientists too. Neuroscientist Colin Ellard works “at the intersection of psychology and architectural and urban design.” In his book, Places of the Heart: The Psychogeography of Everyday Life, Ellard examines how our technology-based world impacts our emotions and behavior to try to figure out what kind of world we should strive to create.

Collaborative Virtual Reality Allows Design Professionals to Meet Inside The Model

06:00 - 27 November, 2017

Successful communication is fundamental to the success of any project, especially in architecture and construction. The industry has moved from 2D drawings to 3D BIM with programs like SketchUp and Revit. At times, there is still a struggle to communicate in and through these 3D models. From InsiteVR comes a solution.

The newest innovation by InsiteVR is like screen sharing but for 3D. As virtual reality gets more affordable and portable, collaborative VR has the potential to be as common as a screen share meeting. Together or in separate parts of the world, InsiteVR meetings allow architecture and construction professionals to review their models in virtual reality. Features include a designated lead presenter, built in voice, collaborative markups, synchronized cloud models, scale and mute controls.

via InsiteVR via InsiteVR via InsiteVR via InsiteVR + 7

The Science Behind the Next Generation of Wood Buildings

Sponsored Article
The Science Behind the Next Generation of Wood Buildings, UC San Diego Shake Table Test | Photo: NEHRI@UCSD
UC San Diego Shake Table Test | Photo: NEHRI@UCSD

At a time when engineers, designers, and builders must find solutions for a resource-constrained environment, new wood technology, materials, and science are accelerating efforts to enhance safety and structural performance.

International Building Code requires all building systems, regardless of materials used, to perform to the same level of health and safety standards. These codes have long recognized wood’s performance capabilities and allow its use in a wide range of low- to mid-rise residential and non-residential building types. Moreover, wood often surpasses steel and concrete in terms of strength, durability, fire safety, seismic performance, and sustainability – among other qualities.