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Taco Taller De Arquitectura Contextual: The Latest Architecture and News

Concrete Architecture: 20 Outstanding Projects in Mexico

Foro Boca / Rojkind Arquitectos. Image © Jaime NavarroCasa Lomas / Oficio Taller. Image © Adrián Llaguno / Documentación Arquitectónica y The RawsClub de Niños y Niñas / CCA Centro de Colaboración Arquitectónica. Image © Arturo ArrietaCasa Orgánica / Javier Senosiain. Image Cortesía de Javier Senosian+ 23

Concrete, a material commonly used in the construction industry, is made of a binder combined with aggregates (or gravels), water, and certain additives. Its origins reach back as far as Ancient Egypt, when the construction of large structures created the need for a new kind of material: one which was liquid, featured properties of natural stones, could be molded, and communicated a sense of nobility and grandeur. 

30 Years After Luis Barragán: 30 Architects Share Their Favorite Works

Torres de Satélite / Luis Barragán + Mathias Goeritz. Image © Rodrigo FloresCasa Barragán. Image © Rodrigo FloresCasa Gilardi / Luis Barragán. Image © Eduardo LuqueCasa Gilardi / Luis Barragán. Image © Eduardo Luque+ 16

On November 22, 1988, one of the most important and revered figures in the history of Mexican and international architecture died in Mexico City. Luis Barragán Morfín, born in Guadalajara and trained as a civil engineer left behind an extensive legacy of published works, conferences, buildings, houses, and gardens that remain relevant to this day. While Barragán was known for his far-reaching research in customs and traditions, above all, the architect spent his life in contemplation. His sensitivity to the world and continued effort to rewrite the mundane has made him a lasting figure in Mexico, and the world.

Undoubtedly, Luis Barragán's legacy represents something so complex and timeless that it continues to inspire and surprise architects across generations. It is because of this that, 30 years after his death, we've compiled this series of testimonies from some of Mexico's most prominent contemporary architects, allowing them to reflect on their favorites of Barragan's works and share just how his work has impacted and inspired theirs. 

8 Mexican Projects That Use Bamboo

In 4 Days, 100 Volunteers Used Mud and Reeds To Build This Community Center in Mexico. Image © Pedro Bravo, Sofía Hernández, Francisco MartínezCafetería Rural Comunitaria Tosepan Kajfen / Proyecto cafeína + Komoni. Image © Patrick LópezRural House in Puebla / Comunal Taller de Arquitectura. Image © Onnis LuqueSport City Oaxaca / Rootstudio + Arquitectos Artesanos. Image © Angel Ivan Valdivia Salazar+ 9

Mexico is a country known globally for its traditional and contemporary architectural elements. The construction techniques characteristic of each region and the use of materials according to thermic, economic, or aesthetic needs result in unique spaces.

Bamboo as a constructive or decorative element, coating, facade, or roof has proven its superiority over materials such as plastic and steel.

While it is true that research on this material has advanced significantly in recent years, we know that there is still much to learn. Many architects are seeking knowledge from the past to apply to their current techniques. Below, we've selected a list of 8 Mexican projects that explore the use of bamboo in the hands of architects and artisans.

A Tribute to the Color of Contemporary Mexican Architecture

© BGP© Javier Callejas© Paco Pérez Arriaga© Leo Espinosa+ 20

Color, inherited from indigenous cultures of Mexico, is a defining characteristic of Mexican architecture. Vibrant colors have been used by architects and artists such as Luis Barragán, Ricardo Legorreta, Mathias Goeritz, Juan O'Gorman, and Mario Pani.

Color in Mexican architecture has reinforced the identity of different regions and areas within the country. For example, it is almost impossible to think of San Miguel de Allende or Guanajuato without the facade colors that weave the landscape.

21 Examples of Brise Soleils in Mexico and Its Diverse Applications

Estudio Iturbide / Taller de Arquitectura Mauricio Rocha + Gabriela Carrillo. Image Cortesía de Taller de Arquitectura Mauricio Rocha + Gabriela CarrilloVivienda en Puebla / Comunal Taller de Arquitectura. Image © Onnis LuqueJuzgados Oral-Penal en Pátzcuaro / Taller de Arquitectura Mauricio Rocha + Gabriela Carrillo. Image © Rafael GamoLa Tallera / Frida Escobedo. Image © Rafael Gamo+ 22

The brise soleil is an architectural element that has been used since ancient times to create subtle barriers between the interior and the exterior. Its use and design have been diversified over the years through the research and technology with which these elements are applied, creating the ability to build a small window to a complete facade and pavilion that seem to float.

We know that Mexico is a country with one of the most diverse climates, thus the use of a brise soleil is positioned stronger within the guild. Also, rural areas have long adapted the feature in Mexico, demonstrating its beauty and usefulness. Read on for our collection of 21 brise soleil features in Mexican projects to inspire you with its diverse applications.