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Shipping Container

Runway of Life / ML Architect

00:00 - 30 April, 2018
Courtesy of ML Architect
Courtesy of ML Architect

Courtesy of ML Architect Courtesy of ML Architect Courtesy of ML Architect Courtesy of ML Architect + 32

  • Architects

  • Location

    Kaohsiung,Taiwan
  • Lead Architects

    Chih-Feng Lin
  • Collaborators

    Bai Guo Metal Engineering Co.,Ltd., Taie Building materials Co.,Ltd.
  • Curator at Kaohsiung Museum of Fine Arts

    Tseng Fangling
  • Area

    770.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017

LOT-EK: “The Shipping Container Is a Vehicle to Invent New Architecture”

10:30 - 3 January, 2018
LOT-EK: “The Shipping Container Is a Vehicle to Invent New Architecture”, PUMA City, 2008. Image © Danny Bright
PUMA City, 2008. Image © Danny Bright

Shipping containers, once a darling of architectural upcycling, have received a lot of criticism recently, as architects are beginning to recognize that their perceived advantages—ready-made habitable space and structure, and an opportunity to recycle a widely available material—are based in little more than hopeful PR spin. But for one of the most prominent practices which regularly uses shipping containers in their work, LOT-EK, the attraction of these architectural ready-mades always went beyond the ecological and practical rationalizations provided by others. In this interview at the firm's New York studio, part of Vladimir Belogolovsky’s “City of Ideas” series, LOT-EK founders Ada Tolla and Giuseppe Lignano discuss the conceptual foundations of their fascination with shipping container architecture.

Carroll House, Brooklyn, New York, USA, 2016. Image © Danny Bright PUMA City, 2008. Image © Danny Bright Qiyun Mountain Camp, Huangshan, China, 2015. Image © Noah Sheldon Irving Place Carriage House, Brooklyn, New York, USA, 2014. Image © Danny Bright + 48

Bee Breeders Announces Winners of Construction Container Facelift Competition

08:00 - 21 December, 2017
Bee Breeders Announces Winners of Construction Container Facelift Competition, First Prize. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders
First Prize. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders

Bee Breeders have announced the winners of the Construction Container Facelift architecture competition. The competition jury received a wide range of work, but selected proposals which were based on a realistic implementation of a novel solution, maintaining the inherent durability and functionality of the shipping containers versus altering them strictly for aesthetics.

10 Excellent Examples of Works That Adopt the Use of Containers

06:00 - 9 November, 2017

With the green premise growing in popularity across the globe, more and more people are turning to recycling shipping containers as a way to reduce the extremely high surplus of empty shipping containers that are just waiting to become a home, office, apartment, school, dormitory, studio, emergency shelter, or anything else. The conversion of shipping containers to living spaces is not a new concept.

Shipping containers have become a more common architectural tool over the past few years. Through clippings, insertion of external elements, coatings, and equipment, the container is adapted according to its future use and desired aesthetics. See below 10 examples of works that adopt the use of containers.

© Ramiro Sosa © Sergio Pucci Courtesy of Maziar Behrooz Architecture © Leonardo Finotti + 11

You Can Now Buy a Shipping-Container Tiny House from Amazon (But Should You?)

09:30 - 1 November, 2017
You Can Now Buy a Shipping-Container Tiny House from Amazon (But Should You?), via Amazon
via Amazon

The conversion of shipping containers to living spaces is not a new concept—but being able to purchase them online and have them delivered by e-commerce giant Amazon is. Deliveries by the Seattle-based (and seemingly endlessly expanding) company are becoming a staple for most American households: dogs have never barked so much at the postman, porches have never been so littered with empty boxes, and never before has almost every product on the market been available from one place without even having to leave the house.

In spite of this consumer revolution, homes on demand constitutes new territory for the platform. So what does it look like when an entire house is delivered on the back of a truck?

The Renaissance City: 3 Architectural Initiatives Point the Way Forward For Detroit

Sponsored Article
The Renaissance City: 3 Architectural Initiatives Point the Way Forward For Detroit, Structural prototype by the makeLab™at LTU. Image courtesy of LTU
Structural prototype by the makeLab™at LTU. Image courtesy of LTU

Detroit is a long-standing symbol of innovation in America, especially in the production of automobiles, music, and, at one point in history, airplanes. It has, correspondingly, been called the Motor City, Motown, and the Cradle of Democracy. Over the last half-century, racial tension, urban migration, and disinvestment have shifted the city’s identity, causing it to become a symbol of post-industrial America and the attendant urban deterioration. Together, these elements render Detroit’s more recent nickname—the Renaissance City—tragically ironic.

Arkitema Architects Designs 30 Shipping Container Apartments in Roskilde, Denmark

08:00 - 24 October, 2017
Arkitema Architects Designs 30 Shipping Container Apartments in Roskilde, Denmark, Courtesy of Arkitema Architets
Courtesy of Arkitema Architets

Beat Box: 30 apartments in 48 containers to transform the Danish neighborhood of Musicon, adjacent to the famous Roskilde Festival area. Designed by Arkitema Architects and constructed by Container Living, Beat Box is an integral part of Roskilde’s goal to revamp Musicon over the next 15 years by adding 1,000 jobs and 1,000 homes.

3 Different Ways to Use a Shipping Container on Your Next Project

06:00 - 9 October, 2017

Recycling material in architecture is becoming increasingly valued in order to enable the creation of sustainable projects. Certainly, naval containers have been one of the elements that have gained prominence in recent years for the design of private and public buildings that respect the environment. In addition to the ecological appeal, containers are a viable choice due to the speed and ease of assembly, the option of a cleaner construction site, or even the different design solutions that this material provides. With their standardized sizes, it becomes possible to create a modular structure that allows infinite possibilities of intervention, so that it suits different uses.

We have gathered here 20 examples of works that adopt the use of containers and some tips that will certainly help you on your next project.

Shipping Container Home by Whitaker Studio Blooms Like a Desert Flower from Rocky Joshua Tree Site

14:00 - 27 September, 2017
Shipping Container Home by Whitaker Studio Blooms Like a Desert Flower from Rocky Joshua Tree Site, Courtesy of Whitaker Studio
Courtesy of Whitaker Studio

Blossoming from the rugged terrain of the California desert, Whitaker Studio’s Joshua Tree Residence is taking shipping container architecture to the next level. Set to begin construction in 2018, the home is laid out in a starburst of containers, each oriented to maximize views, provide abundant natural light or to create privacy dependent on their location and use.

Courtesy of Whitaker Studio Courtesy of Whitaker Studio Courtesy of Whitaker Studio Courtesy of Whitaker Studio + 16

Recycled Shipping Containers as Backyard Swimming Pools

12:00 - 7 May, 2017
Recycled Shipping Containers as Backyard Swimming Pools, Courtesy of Modpool
Courtesy of Modpool

From high rises to housing to kiosks and disaster relief, shipping containers have become a more common architectural tool over the past few years. Now, Canada-based company Modpool has unveiled yet another use for shipping containers—backyard swimming pools and hot tubs.

Designed to be modular and simple to install, the pools are shipped with all necessary equipment—including a UV water cleaning system built in so that only light ground prep and power and gas access are necessary before the spaces are ready to use.

Studioshaw's Competition-Winning Interactive Hub for Dundee

06:00 - 2 March, 2017
Studioshaw's Competition-Winning Interactive Hub for Dundee, Flexible studios to aid Dundee's thriving digital creative sector. Image Courtesy of Studioshaw
Flexible studios to aid Dundee's thriving digital creative sector. Image Courtesy of Studioshaw

London-based firm Studioshaw has won a competition to design a hub facility for children and young people in Dundee, Scotland. The Interactive Hub will be located on the site of a former railway depot at the Seabraes Yards Digital Media Park. The competition, hosted by the Dundee Institute of Architects (DIA) and Scottish Enterprise, was one of 400 events taking place across Scotland as part of the RIAS 2016 Festival of Architecture.

Flexible studios to aid Dundee's thriving digital creative sector. Image Courtesy of Studioshaw The scheme contains sheltered public space for outdoor digital theatre and drone races. Image Courtesy of Studioshaw The proposal forms part of a masterplan to regenerate Seabraes Yards. Image Courtesy of Studioshaw The scheme contains sheltered public space for outdoor digital theatre and drone races. Image Courtesy of Studioshaw + 6

This Recreation of Shakespeare's Globe Theatre is Built with Shipping Containers

09:30 - 25 September, 2016
This Recreation of Shakespeare's Globe Theatre is Built with Shipping Containers, Globe by Michigan Station, Detroit. Image Courtesy of The Container Globe
Globe by Michigan Station, Detroit. Image Courtesy of The Container Globe

All the world’s a stage – quite literally so, in the case of the Container Globe, a proposal to reconstruct a version of Shakespeare’s famous Globe Theatre with shipping containers. Staying true to the design of the original Globe Theatre in London, the Container Globe sees repurposed containers come together in a familiar form, but in steel rather than wood. Founder Angus Vail hopes this change in building component will give the Container Globe both a "punk rock" element and international mobility, making it as mobile as the shipping containers that make up its structure.

Globe by the Brooklyn Bridge, New York. Image Courtesy of The Container Globe View of Stage from the Yard. Image Courtesy of The Container Globe View from Upper Seating Gallery. Image Courtesy of The Container Globe Globe in Waitangi Park, Wellington NZ. Image Courtesy of The Container Globe + 21

Dutch Designers Propose Ways of Transforming Decommissioned Oil Tankers Into Tiny Cities

04:00 - 1 February, 2016
Dutch Designers Propose Ways of Transforming Decommissioned Oil Tankers Into Tiny Cities, ©  Chris Collaris Design, Ruben Esser, Sander Bakker and Patrick van der Gronde / MISS3
© Chris Collaris Design, Ruben Esser, Sander Bakker and Patrick van der Gronde / MISS3

Four Dutch designers—Chris Collaris, Ruben Esser, Sander Bakker and Patrick van der Gronde—have envisioned a sustainable design of re-use for a discarded oil tanker in the Southern Gulf Region, which they have entitled The Black Gold. They believe that the oil tanker is the "perfect icon" for representing "the geographic, economic and cultural history of the Arabic oil states" – an icon which they predict will become more and more obsolete as the supply of crude oil is moved away from shipping and into pipe infrastructure.

Opinion: What’s Wrong With Shipping Container Housing? Everything.

09:30 - 13 September, 2015
Opinion: What’s Wrong With Shipping Container Housing? Everything., CRG Architects' proposal for a shipping container skyscraper in Mumbai. Image © EAFIE
CRG Architects' proposal for a shipping container skyscraper in Mumbai. Image © EAFIE

At ArchDaily, we believe it's important to keep our readers up to date on all the most interesting developments in architecture. Sometimes, we will present ideas and projects with a critical eye; however, in many cases we simply present ideas neutrally in the hope that it will spark some discussion or critical response within the profession. Recently, a series of connected news articles about proposals for high-rise shipping-container housing provoked just such a response from Mark Hogan, principle at San Francisco-based firm OpenScope. Originally posted on his blog Markasaurus here's his reasoning for why, contrary to the hype, "shipping containers are not a 'solution' for mass housing."

What’s wrong with shipping container buildings? Nothing, if they’re used for the right purpose. For a temporary facility, where an owner desires the shipping container aesthetic, they can be a good fit (look, I’ve even done a container project!). For sites where on-site construction is not feasible or desirable, fitting a container out in the factory can be a sensible option, even though you’ll still have to do things like pour foundations on site. It probably won’t save you any money over conventional construction (and very well might cost more), but it can solve some other problems.

The place where containers really don’t make any sense is housing. I know you’ve seen all the proposals, often done with an humanitarian angle (building slum housing, housing for refugees etc) that promise a factory-built "solution" to the housing "problem" but often positioned as a luxury product as well.

CRG Architects' proposal for a shipping container skyscraper in Mumbai (click image for project post). Image © EAFIE OVA Studio's 2014 proposal for a high-rise shipping container hotel. Image via Laughing Squid Ganti + Asociates Design's proposal for a shipping container skyscraper in Mumbai. Image Courtesy of GA Design Ganti + Asociates Design's proposal for a shipping container skyscraper in Mumbai. Image Courtesy of GA Design + 6

GA Designs Radical Shipping Container Skyscraper for Mumbai Slum

12:40 - 24 August, 2015
GA Designs Radical Shipping Container Skyscraper for Mumbai Slum, Courtesy of GA Design
Courtesy of GA Design

Ganti + Asociates (GA) Design has won an international ideas competition with a radical shipping container skyscraper that was envisioned to provide temporary housing in Mumbai's overpopulated Dharavi Slum. Taking in consideration that steel shipping containers can be stacked up to 10 stories high without any additional support, GA's winning scheme calls for a 100-meter-tall highrise comprised of a series of self supported container clusters divided by steel girders placed every 8 stories.

Courtesy of GA Design Corridor . Image Courtesy of GA Design Courtesy of GA Design Final Board. Image Courtesy of GA Design + 11

CRG Envisions Shipping Container Skyscraper Concept for Mumbai

12:40 - 20 August, 2015
CRG Envisions Shipping Container Skyscraper Concept for Mumbai, © EAFIE
© EAFIE

CRG Architects has won third prize in an ideas competition focused on providing temporary housing in Mumbai, India. Set with in the heavily populated Dharavi Slum, CRG's “Containscrapers” propose to house 5,000 city dwellers by stacking 2,500 shipping containers up to heights of 400-meters. If built, the radical proposal would be supported by a concrete structure and offer a range of housing options, from flats to three bedroom residences.

Designers Explore an Entirely New Use for Shipping Containers in Seoul’s Design District

01:00 - 22 November, 2014
Designers Explore an Entirely New Use for Shipping Containers in Seoul’s Design District , Information kiosk. Image Courtesy of NL Architects
Information kiosk. Image Courtesy of NL Architects

Fashion, design and architecture collide in Zaha Hadid's recently completed Dongdaemun Design Plaza, one South Korea's most popular tourist destinations. Commissioned by the Design Plaza's Supervisor of Public Space Young Joon Kim of yo2 Architects, the latest development for the plaza is a series of compact kiosks designed to activate the expansive public space surrounding the new building. One of ten teams invited to submit ideas for these new kiosks, Amsterdam-based NL Architects developed a series of impermanent but practical solutions for the plaza. Using new methods for reuse of standard shipping containers, the team proposed a host of kiosks, with two of their designs - an information booth and a miniature exhibition space - being accepted for construction.

See all of NL Architects'  Zaha-inspired shipping container kiosks after the break

Courtesy of NL Architects Information kiosk. Image Courtesy of NL Architects Information kiosk. Image Courtesy of NL Architects Courtesy of NL Architects + 28

Users Create the Color in this Super-Sized Kaleidoscope

00:00 - 3 August, 2014
Users Create the Color in this Super-Sized Kaleidoscope, Courtesy of Shirane-Miyazaki
Courtesy of Shirane-Miyazaki

2013 KOBE Biennale visitors had the opportunity to experience the magic of a kaleidoscope in a whole new way thanks to Saya Miyazaki and Masakazu Shiranes' award-winning installation. The psychedelic polyhedral installation was designed for the Art Container Contest, which challenged participants to create interesting environments within the confines of a single shipping container. As visitors meandered through the installation, they became active participants – rather than passive observers – in the kaleidoscope's constantly changing appearance. For more images and information, continue after the break.

Courtesy of Shirane-Miyazaki Courtesy of Shirane-Miyazaki Courtesy of Shirane-Miyazaki Courtesy of Shirane-Miyazaki + 5