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Four Stunning Renovated Apartments in Oscar Niemeyer-Designed Buildings

04:00 - 10 January, 2019
Four Stunning Renovated Apartments in Oscar Niemeyer-Designed Buildings, Apartamento P.R. / pianca+urano. Image © Manuel Sá
Apartamento P.R. / pianca+urano. Image © Manuel Sá

To live in a residence designed by a renowned architect is a dream for many, however, a dream that will most likely never come true. But, there is an alternative. Many architecture enthusiasts have rented or even bought apartments in iconic buildings designed by their favorite architects. 

In regards to the work of Oscar Niemeyer, fluidity and flexibility may best express his plans and typologies.

Below, we've selected four apartments in buildings designed by Neimeyer that reinterpret his original plans.

Oscar Niemeyer to be Featured on the Streets of Rio

05:00 - 8 January, 2019
Oscar Niemeyer to be Featured on the Streets of Rio, Contemporary Art Museum (MAC). Image © Iñigo Bujedo-Aguirre
Contemporary Art Museum (MAC). Image © Iñigo Bujedo-Aguirre

The work of Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer is currently being featured by the city of Rio de Janeiro. Throughout the month of January, mock-ups and engravings signed by the architect can be seen in Barra da Tijuca, in the city’s West Side. There, visitors can discover the history of Brazilian architecture and see some of Niemeyer's most famous work. The RioCVB created the exhibition to celebrate Niemeyer's legacy and showcase Brazil's landmark buildings.

Celebrating Oscar Niemeyer and His Masterworks Through a Photographic Lens

05:00 - 18 December, 2018
Celebrating Oscar Niemeyer and His Masterworks Through a Photographic Lens, © Danica O. Kus
© Danica O. Kus

To honor renowned Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer’s birthday (December 15, 1907), Slovenian photographer Danica Kus published a series of black and white photographs highlighting Niemeyer’s surviving architecture. The architect, who passed in 2012 at the age of 104, is considered one of the greatest modernist architects of the 20th century.

Kus’ photographs accentuate the hyperbolic curves characteristic of Niemeyer’s design, while also highlighting the geometric harmony of rectilinear elements. In an exclusive interview with ArchDaily before his death, Mr. Niemeyer described his personal definition of architecture: “In my opinion, architecture is invention. And under this prism is how I do my projects, always searching for beautiful, expressive, different and surprising solutions.” This photo series encompasses the subtleties of Niemeyer’s premier works and spans his career.

Spotlight: Oscar Niemeyer

08:00 - 15 December, 2018
Cathedral of Brasília. Image © Gonzalo Viramonte
Cathedral of Brasília. Image © Gonzalo Viramonte

Oscar Ribeiro de Almeida Niemeyer Soares Filho, or simply Oscar Niemeyer, (December 15, 1907 – December 5, 2012) was one of the greatest architects in Brazil's history, and one of the greats of the global modernist movement. After his death in 2012, Niemeyer left the world more than five hundred works scattered throughout the Americas, Africa, and Europe.

Niterói Contemporary Art Museum. Image © Gili Merin Oscar Niemeyer International Cultural Centre in the Principality of Asturias, Spain. Image © Iñigo Bujedo-Aguirre National Congress of Brazil. Image © Andrew Prokos Cathedral of Brasília. Image © Gonzalo Viramonte + 25

Iconic Columns in Modern Brazilian Architecture

06:00 - 24 November, 2018
Iconic Columns in Modern Brazilian Architecture, © Joana França. Image Palácio da Alvorada
© Joana França. Image Palácio da Alvorada

Of Le Corbusier's five points of modern architecture (the ribbon window, free design of the façade and ground plan, a roof garden, and pilotis), pilotis are perhaps the most used element in Brazilian modern architecture.

Life after Serpentine: Second Lives of Architecture's Famed Pavilions

09:30 - 18 October, 2018
Life after Serpentine: Second Lives of Architecture's Famed Pavilions, Serpentine Pavilion 2016 / Bjarke Ingels. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu
Serpentine Pavilion 2016 / Bjarke Ingels. Image © Laurian Ghinitoiu

If the surest sign of summer in London is the appearance of a new pavilion in front of the Serpentine Gallery, then it’s perhaps fair to say that summer is over once the pavilion is taken down. The installations have gained prominence since its inaugural edition in 2000, acting as a kind of exclusive honor and indication of talent for those chosen to present; celebrated names from the past names include Zaha Hadid, Rem Koolhaas, and Olafur Eliasson.

Serpentine Pavilion 2015 / Selgas Cano. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion 2014 / Smiljan Radic. Image © Iwan Baan Serpentine Pavilion 2006 / Rem Koolhaas. Image © John Offenbach Serpentine Pavilion 2007 / Olafur Eliasson, Kjetil Thorsen, Cecil Balmond. Image © Luke Hayes + 20

Oscar Niemeyer's Unfinished Architecture in Lebanon May Become a UNESCO World Heritage Site

08:00 - 6 October, 2018
Oscar Niemeyer's Unfinished Architecture in Lebanon May Become a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Tripoli International Fair. Image © Anthony Saroufim
Tripoli International Fair. Image © Anthony Saroufim

The unfinished Tripoli International Fair, designed by Oscar Niemeyer for the Lebanese capital, could become a UNESCO's World Heritage Site. Conceived in the 1960s at the request of the then President Fouad Chéhab, the fair remained a symbol of projected modernity for the country.

10 Images of Architecture Reflected in Water

12:00 - 5 August, 2018
10 Images of Architecture Reflected in Water, © Yao Li
© Yao Li

This week we have prepared a selection of photographs in which reflections in water is used as the main compositional element. In these images, the surface qualities of the water play a fundamental role in giving the composition its final effect—either acting as a perfect mirror or giving a diffuse touch. Below is a selection of 10 images from prominent photographers such as Lu Hengzhong, Yao Li, and Nico Saieh.

© Nico Saieh © Yao Li © Lu Hengzhong © Fernando Guerra |  FG+SG + 11

7 Shout-Outs to Architects in Rap Lyrics

09:30 - 23 July, 2018
© Messe Basel
© Messe Basel

About a month before he unveiled his eighth album Ye in June, Kanye West re-entered architectural conversation with the unexpected and mostly unexplained announcement that he intends to hire architects and industrial designers to staff an architecture practice connected to his Yeezy brand. An outspoken fan and admirer of contemporary architecture, Kanye’s fashion and design projects have been a major focus for him since shortly after the prodigious producer started making his own rap albums. Kanye’s architectural ambitions have been an interesting factor in the relationship between architecture and rap culture, which seems to be just coming into focus through programs like the Hip Hop Architecture Camps organized by Michael Ford’s Urban Arts Collective, and the research of Sekou Cooke. Architecture and rap music have influenced each other in ways we’re just starting to notice—with the connection between the two even revealed as consciously and conspicuously as rappers including references to notable architects in their lyrics.

How Important is the Name of a Renowned Architect to a Project?

09:30 - 2 July, 2018
How Important is the Name of a Renowned Architect to a Project?, Port offices of Antwerp, Zaha Hadid Architects, 2016. Image © Helene Binet
Port offices of Antwerp, Zaha Hadid Architects, 2016. Image © Helene Binet

From the Fundación Arquia Blog, architect José Ramón Hernandez brings us an article that reflects on projects that can only be appreciated because of who they were created by. If it weren't for the fact that they bear the signature of their illustrious creator, they most likely would have gone completely unnoticed or even despised.

Concrete Shells: Design Principles and Examples

06:00 - 14 June, 2018
Concrete Shells: Design Principles and Examples, Capela Bosjes / Steyn Studio. Image © Adam Letch
Capela Bosjes / Steyn Studio. Image © Adam Letch

Let's think of a paper sheet. If we tried to stiffen it from its primary state, it couldn't support its own weight. However, if we bend it, the sheet achieves a new structural quality. The shells act in the same way. "You can't imagine a form that doesn't need a structure or a structure that doesn't have a form. Every form has a structure, and every structure has a form. Thus, you can't conceive a form without automatically conceiving a structure and vice versa". [1] The importance of the structural thought that culminates in the constructed object is then, taken by the relationship between form and structure. The shells arise from the association between concrete and steel and are structures whose continuous curved surfaces have a minimal thickness; thus they are widely used in roofs of large spans without intermediate supports.

In structural terms, they are efficient because they resist compression efforts and absorb at specific points on their surface, especially near the supports — small moments of flexion.

Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

14:00 - 11 June, 2018
Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

Lasting for close to two decades now, the annual Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Exhibition has become one of the most anticipated architectural events in London and for the global architecture community. Each of the previous eighteen pavilions have been thought-provoking, leaving an indelible mark and strong message to the architectural community. And even though each of the past pavilions are removed from the site after their short summer stints to occupy far-flung private estates, they continue to be shared through photographs, and in architectural lectures. With the launch of the 18th Pavilion, we take a look back at all the previous pavilions and their significance to the architecturally-minded public.

Serpentine Pavilion 2013. Image © Neil MacWilliams Serpentine Pavilion 2000. Image © Helene Binet Serpentine Pavilion 2006. Image © John Offenbach Serpentine Pavilion 2015. Image © Iwan Baan + 38

No One is Born Modern: The Early Works of 20th Century Architecture Icons

08:00 - 6 June, 2018
No One is Born Modern: The Early Works of 20th Century Architecture Icons

In the ambit of architecture, much of the twentieth century is marked by a production that reads, in general, as modern. The foundations of this work have been the subject of discussion for at least six decades, bringing together conflicting opinions about the true intention behind the modern gestalt.

AD Classics: French Communist Party Headquarters / Oscar Niemeyer

09:30 - 23 April, 2018
© Denis Esakov
© Denis Esakov

In March 1972, an article in The Architectural Review proclaimed that this structure was “probably the best building in Paris since Le Corbusier’s Cité de Refuge for the Salvation Army.”[1] The article was, of course, referring to Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer’s first project in Europe: the French Communist Party Headquarters in Paris, France, built between 1967 and 1980. Having worked with Le Corbusier on the 1952 United Nations Building in New York and recently finished the National Congress as well as additional iconic government buildings in Brasilia, Niemeyer was no stranger to the intimate relationship between architecture and political power.[2]

© Denis Esakov © Denis Esakov © Denis Esakov © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/o_0/29118795843/'>Flickr user Guilhem Vellut</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a> + 37

Furniture Designed by Brazilian Architects

08:00 - 19 March, 2018
Furniture Designed by Brazilian Architects, Poltrona Bowl_Lina Bo Bardi. Image © Nelson Kon
Poltrona Bowl_Lina Bo Bardi. Image © Nelson Kon

For some practitioners of architecture, the insatiable desire to draw everything, from the largest to the smallest to take full control of the project, echoes the famous phrase uttered by Mies Van Der Rohe: "God is in the details." Similarly, designing furniture provides another creative outlet for in-depth exploration of human-scale works of architecture.

Throughout the history of the Brazilian Architecture, and especially since the modernist movement, architects not only became known for their building designs, but also for their detailed chairs and tables. Several of these pieces of furniture were initially designed for a specific project and then went into mass production due to their popularity. 

Cadeira Isa d’aprés siza_Marcenaria Baraúna. Image Cortesia de Dpot Cadeira Nóize_Guto Requena. Image Cortesia de Guto Requena Poltrona Bowl_Lina Bo Bardi. Image © Nelson Kon Poltrona Paulistano_Paulo Mendes da Rocha. Image Cortesia de Dpot + 55

Who Has Won the Pritzker Prize?

08:00 - 25 February, 2018
Who Has Won the Pritzker Prize?, Pritzker Prize 2017 Ceremony: Ryue Nishizawa, Tadao Ando, Kazuyo Sejima, Rafael Aranda, Glenn Murcutt, Carme Pigem, Ramon Vilalta, Toyo Ito, Shigeru Ban. Image © The Hyatt Foundation / Pritzker Architecture Prize
Pritzker Prize 2017 Ceremony: Ryue Nishizawa, Tadao Ando, Kazuyo Sejima, Rafael Aranda, Glenn Murcutt, Carme Pigem, Ramon Vilalta, Toyo Ito, Shigeru Ban. Image © The Hyatt Foundation / Pritzker Architecture Prize

The Pritzker Prize is the most important award in the field of architecture, awarded to a living architect whose built work "has produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity through the art of architecture." The Prize rewards individuals, not entire offices, as took place in 2000 (when the jury selected Rem Koolhaas instead of his firm OMA) or in 2016 (with Alejandro Aravena selected instead of Elemental); however, the prize can also be awarded to multiple individuals working together, as took place in 2001 (Herzog & de Meuron), 2010 (Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa of SANAA), and 2017 (Rafael Aranda, Carme Pigem, and Ramon Vilalta of RCR Arquitectes).

The award is an initiative funded by Jay Pritzker through the Hyatt Foundation, an organization associated with the hotel company of the same name that Jay founded with his brother Donald in 1957. The award was first given in 1979, when the American architect Philip Johnson, was awarded for his iconic works such as the Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut.

The Pritzker Prize has been awarded for almost forty straight years without interruption, and there are now 18 countries with at least one winning architect. To date, half of the winners are European; while the Americas, Asia, and Oceania share the other twenty editions. So far, no African architect has been awarded, making it the only continent without a winner.

Explore Oscar Niemeyer's Unbuilt House in Israel with This 3D Model

09:30 - 8 December, 2017

The name Niemeyer stands for one thing above all: curves. Whether undulating lines, soaring domes, or swooping pillars that repeat in perfect rhythm, his designs reject “the straight line, hard and inflexible, created by man” in favor of “the curved Universe of Einstein,” as he wrote in his 2000 memoir The Curves of Time. Indeed, a late interview with him was headlined “the architect who eradicated the straight line.”

But what happens to an artist who becomes wedded to a certain philosophy of form and pursues it exclusively for decades; does it become restrictive? I wonder whether Niemeyer ever questioned his monogamous dedication to the curve. Perhaps a certain restlessness drove the uncharacteristically sharp-edged plan of the Tel Aviv house he designed for hotel magnate Yekutiel Federmann—or perhaps it reflects the political and personal upheaval of the moment.

Oscar Niemeyer's "Favorite Project in Europe" Captured in Spectacular Photo Set by Karina Castro

09:30 - 18 November, 2017
Oscar Niemeyer's "Favorite Project in Europe" Captured in Spectacular Photo Set by Karina Castro, © Karina Castro
© Karina Castro

As a trailblazer of Brazilian Modernism, Oscar Niemeyer is celebrated for his bold, sinuous forms, and his use of the “the liberated, sensual curve.” Paul Goldberger described it best when he wrote that “Niemeyer didn’t compromise modernism’s utopian ideals, but when filtered through his sensibility, the stern, unforgiving rigor of so much European modernism became as smooth as Brazilian jazz.”

When Georgio Mondadori, chairman of the Italian publishing house Mondadori, commissioned Niemeyer to design the company’s new headquarters in 1968, he wanted the building to look like the Itamaraty Palace (also known as Palace of the Arches) in Brasília. Niemeyer agreed, but given his playful spirit, he deliberately deviated from the earlier design and proceeded to build what he would later identify as his favorite of the projects he completed in Europe. Read on to see a striking set of sixteen photographs of the Mondadori building by Milan-based photographer and visual artist Karina Castro, who was commissioned by Mondadori to capture their headquarters over 40 years after the building's completion.

© Karina Castro © Karina Castro © Karina Castro © Karina Castro + 15