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Fr Ee Fernando Romero Enterprise

FR-EE's Museo Soumaya Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

04:00 - 20 July, 2017
FR-EE's Museo Soumaya Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

The Museo Soumaya, which opened to the public in 2011, is one of the more striking cultural landmarks on the skyline of Mexico City. Designed by FR-EE / Fernando Romero Enterprise, the space accommodates and displays a private art collection of nearly 70,000 works spanning the 15th to the mid-20th Centuries, including the world’s largest private collection of Auguste Rodin sculptures. In this photo-essay, photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has turned his lens to this – a rotated rhomboid clad in a skin of 16,000 hexagonal mirrored-steel panels.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 38

FR-EE Installation Explores Man's Relationship with Sun at Design Miami/

16:00 - 8 December, 2015
FR-EE Installation Explores Man's Relationship with Sun at Design Miami/, © Robin Hill
© Robin Hill

Swarovski commissioned FR-EE / Fernando Romero EnterprisE to design an installation for Design Miami/ that "explores man's relationship with the sun." One billion times smaller than the sun, the installation - El Sol - is a spherical geodesic dome made from 2880 Swarovski crystals that "augment light emitted from its core" to "evoke the sun's gaseous, moving terrain."

"The project has allowed me to explore mathematics in relation to nature and my Mexican ancestry, which is very important and personal to my practice," said Fernando Romero.  

Video: Inside FR-EE's Mexico City Office

16:00 - 3 December, 2015

FR-EE / Fernando Romero Enterprise, a global architecture and design firm founded by Fernando Romero that is known for its radically diverse portfolio, is currently working on designs for Mexico City's new international airport. Watch the video above, filmed by German photographer Yannick Wegner and his colleague Julián Cáceres Aravena, for an introduction on the massive project and insight on the firm's overall design approach.

The Mexican Moment: The Rise of Architecture's Latest Design Capital

01:00 - 16 December, 2014
The Mexican Moment: The Rise of Architecture's Latest Design Capital, Museo Soumaya / FR-EE. Image © Rafael Gamo
Museo Soumaya / FR-EE. Image © Rafael Gamo

On a recent trip abroad, architect and urban planner José Castillo was struck by a conversation with Mexico’s tourism attaché in Asia. Mexican tourism, the attaché remarked, has changed; it was the ancient pyramids and sandy beaches of the country that once drew visitors to it. Today however, architecture and design—and food—prevail.

The issue of food may be of little wonder. Mexican cuisine has indeed become more popular than ever in both the high and low ends of the culinary spectrum, and food in general is not only what one eats for dinner but also a hobby and an obsessive conversation topic. Yet for local design to come to the same level of acclaim and reputation is, at any rate, quite astonishing. It may be, though, that food and architecture are not so far apart. These are both highly creative and productive professions, as well as ones with a rich history, a theory, and many layers of tradition.

La Tallera / Frida Escobedo. Image © Rafael Gamo Zeller & Moye and FR-EE's "Archivo". Image Courtesy of Zeller & Moye Foster + Partners and FR-EE's design for the new Mexico City Airport. Image Courtesy of DBOX for Foster + Partners PRODUCTORA's Auditorio Cuernavaca, with the Teopanzolco Pyramid in the background. Image Courtesy of PRODUCTORA + 9

VIDEO: Time-Lapse Through FR-EE's Museo Soumaya

00:00 - 15 September, 2014

German photographer Yannick Wegner has shared with us his latest time-lapse exploration through the Museo Soumaya. Designed by FR-EE / Fernando Romero Enterprise, the 150-foot structure has become iconic in Mexico City’s Polanco district due to its sculptural physique and scale-like skin of 16,000 mirrored steel hexagonal tiles.

Stills of the museum, after the break...

New Details Released of Norman Foster and Fernando Romero's Designs for Mexico City's New Airport

00:00 - 4 September, 2014

Yesterday, a consortium led by Foster + Partners and Fernando Romero of FR-EE were announced as the winners of the competition for the design of Mexico City's new international airport. Designed in conjunction with a masterplan developed by Arup, the airport will initially include three runways, but is designed to expand to up to six runways by 2062, all served by the single terminal building.

One of the world's largest airport terminals at 555,000 square meters, the building is enclosed by a single, continuous lightweight gridshell, the largest of this type of structure ever built with spans reaching up to 170 meters.

By utilizing a single airport terminal, passengers will not need to travel on internal train services or underground tunnels, and the design of the building ensures shorter walking distances and few changes of level, all making for a more relaxing experience for users.

The building is designed to be the world's most sustainable airport, with the single lightweight shell using far less material than a cluster of buildings, and cooling and ventilation strategies that require little to no mechanical assistance for most of the year.

New Details Released of Norman Foster and Fernando Romero's Designs for Mexico City's New Airport

00:00 - 4 September, 2014
New Details Released of Norman Foster and Fernando Romero's Designs for Mexico City's New Airport, Image Captured from video via Foster + Partners
Image Captured from video via Foster + Partners

Yesterday, a consortium led by Foster + Partners and Fernando Romero of FR-EE were announced as the winners of the competition for the design of Mexico City's new international airport. Designed in conjunction with a masterplan developed by Arup, the airport will initially include three runways, but is designed to expand to up to six runways by 2062, all served by the single terminal building.

One of the world's largest airport terminals at 555,000 square meters, the building is enclosed by a single, continuous lightweight gridshell, the largest of this type of structure ever built with spans reaching up to 170 meters. By utilizing a single airport terminal, passengers will not need to travel on internal train services or underground tunnels, and the design of the building ensures shorter walking distances and few changes of level, all making for a more relaxing experience for users.

The building is designed to be the world's most sustainable airport, with the single lightweight shell using far less material than a cluster of buildings, and cooling and ventilation strategies that require little to no mechanical assistance for most of the year.

More details of the design after the break

Foster + Romero Alliance Wins Competition to Design the Mexico City Airport Expansion

01:00 - 3 September, 2014
Foster + Romero Alliance Wins Competition to Design the Mexico City Airport Expansion, © DBOX for Foster + Partners
© DBOX for Foster + Partners

A duo comprised of British architect and Pritzker Prize winner Norman Foster of Foster + Partners and Mexican architect Fernando Romero of FR-EE has won the competition to expand the Mexico City airport, Reuters has reported.

The new airport not only plans to solve overcrowding at the current terminal, but also to “develop economically and socially one of the most densely populated and marginalized regions” of Mexico.  The project is set to be finished by the end of 2018. 

Learn more about the airport and the winning design team after the break…