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English Heritage: The Latest Architecture and News

Tintagel Castle Bridge Competition Won by Ney & Partners and William Matthews Associates

14:00 - 25 March, 2016
Tintagel Castle Bridge Competition Won by Ney & Partners and William Matthews Associates, Proposal: Ney & Partners Civil Engineers with William Matthews Associates, Ettwein Bridges, Waagner Biro, Ramboll and Jackson Coles LLP.. Image © MRC/Emily Whitfield-Wicks
Proposal: Ney & Partners Civil Engineers with William Matthews Associates, Ettwein Bridges, Waagner Biro, Ramboll and Jackson Coles LLP.. Image © MRC/Emily Whitfield-Wicks

English Heritage has announced that a team of Ney & Partners and UK-based William Matthews Associates has won the Tintagel Castle Bridge Design Competition. Chosen from a shortlist of 6 proposals, from among 136 entries, the winning design was selected by the majority of the jury.

The site of Tintagel Castle is one of English Heritage’s most spectacular, attracting over 200,000 visitors annually. It is “inextricably linked to the legend of King Arthur and has been prized throughout history for its elemental qualities and spirit of place within this area of outstanding natural beauty.” The new bridge is commissioned for approximately £4 million and will stand 28m higher than the current crossing.

Shortlisted Concept Designs Revealed for the Tintagel Castle Footbridge

08:30 - 3 December, 2015
Concept Proposal (RFR and Jean-François Blassel Architecte). Image © MRC/Emily Whitfield-Wicks
Concept Proposal (RFR and Jean-François Blassel Architecte). Image © MRC/Emily Whitfield-Wicks

The six concept designs for the Tintagel Castle footbridge, the practices behind which were announced earlier this year, have now been revealed. With a shortlist featuring design consortiums led, among others, by WilkinsonEyre and Niall McLaughlin Architects, the proposals all respond to English Heritage's ambition for "a bridge that is of its place, [...] that, with its structural elegance and beauty, is in harmony with its extraordinary setting and landscape."

Proposal: Niall McLaughlin Architects with Price and Myers. Image © MRC/Emily Whitfield-Wicks Proposal: Ney & Partners Civil Engineers with William Matthews Associates, Ettwein Bridges, Waagner Biro, Ramboll and Jackson Coles LLP. Image © MRC/Emily Whitfield-Wicks Proposal: Marks Barfield Architects with Flint and Neill, J&L Gibbons LLP and MOLA. Image © MRC/Emily Whitfield-Wicks Proposal: WilkinsonEyre with Atelier One. Image © MRC/Emily Whitfield-Wicks + 13

Wilkinson Eyre Among 6 Teams Selected for "Structurally Daring" Bridge at Tintagel Castle

04:00 - 4 September, 2015
Wilkinson Eyre Among 6 Teams Selected for "Structurally Daring" Bridge at Tintagel Castle, Courtesy of English Heritage / Malcolm Reading
Courtesy of English Heritage / Malcolm Reading

English Heritage has announced the six teams shortlisted in the two-stage competition to design a new bridge at Tintagel Castle. Situated on the Island of Tintagel on the Northern coast of Cornwall, the new bridge will strengthen the medieval castle's connection to the mainland, spanning 72 meters at a height 28 meters taller than the existing pedestrian footbridge.

When the competition was announced in June, the organizers Malcolm Reading explained that teams should "envisage an elegant, even structurally daring, concept which is beautiful in its own right and sensitively-balanced with the landscape and exceptional surroundings." The six winners were chosen unanimously from a list of 137 candidates which Chair of the Jury Graham Morrison said reflect "a mix of great talent and experience." Read on for the six teams to go through to the next stage of the contest.

Courtesy of English Heritage / Malcolm Reading Courtesy of English Heritage / Malcolm Reading Courtesy of English Heritage / Malcolm Reading Courtesy of English Heritage / Malcolm Reading + 5

English Heritage Launches Competition for "Structurally Daring" Bridge Design

04:30 - 25 June, 2015
English Heritage Launches Competition for "Structurally Daring" Bridge Design, Courtesy of English Heritage / Malcolm Reading
Courtesy of English Heritage / Malcolm Reading

The ruins of Tintagel Castle, one of English Heritage's most visited sites, has been announced as the site for a new two-stage international ideas competition. The castle, which is linked to the legend of King Arthur, is located in north Cornwall (in the south of the UK) and is built on a rocky outcrop connected to the mainland by a narrow, now eroded, land-bridge. English Heritage require a new footbridge which will be 28 metres higher than the current one, spanning a total distance of 72 metres, with an estimated budget of around £4million (around $6.3million).

Fresh Bid To Save Robin Hood Gardens From Demolition

04:00 - 18 March, 2015
Fresh Bid To Save Robin Hood Gardens From Demolition, © Steve Cadman
© Steve Cadman

It has been reported that London's Robin Hood Gardens housing estate, which was thought to be finally condemned in March 2012, has re-entered a state of flux due to governmental indecision. The former UK Culture Secretary, Andy Burnham, gave the housing scheme an immunity from listing certificate in 2009, meaning that no concerned party could bid for it to gain protected status under British law. This certificate, designed to ensure that the buildings would be swiftly demolished, has now expired. This has led the Twentieth Century Society (C20) to launch a new bid for the estate to be both saved and protected.

'The Rom' Becomes Europe's First Listed Skatepark

00:00 - 29 October, 2014
'The Rom' Becomes Europe's First Listed Skatepark, © Played in Britain
© Played in Britain

English Heritage has awarded a Grade-II listing to "The Rom," a skatepark in Hornchurch on the outskirts of London. Built in 1978, the Rom was one of the UK's first wave of purpose-built skateparks, and probably the most complete example found in the UK today. The listing makes the Rom the first protected skatepark in Europe, and just the second in the world after Tampa's "Bro Bowl" was added to the USA’s National Register of Historic Places last year.

More on the listing decision after the break

© Played in Britain © Played in Britain © Played in Britain © Played in Britain + 6

Cullinan's RMC Headquarters Saved by Grade II* Listing

00:00 - 14 July, 2014
Cullinan's RMC Headquarters Saved by Grade II* Listing, © Richard Learoyd
© Richard Learoyd

English Heritage has announced that the RMC headquarters building designed by Edward Cullinan Architects in 1990 has been listed at grade II*, preventing a plan to demolish the building and replace it with a terraced housing scheme. The listing comes after a campaign to protect the building which was orchestrated by Cullinan Studio and the 20th Century Society, and supported by a a number of high profile architects including Nicholas Grimshaw, Richard Rogers, Peter Clegg (Feilden Clegg Bradley) and Sunand Prasad (Penoyre & Prasad).

Read more about the building and the listing decision after the break

How Can We Hold On To Heritage Skills?

00:00 - 30 June, 2014
How Can We Hold On To Heritage Skills?, © James Taylor-Foster
© James Taylor-Foster

In an age when 1:1 3D printed buildings are becoming ever more commonplace from the Netherlands to China, it's important to pause and assess the existing built fabric of our cities, towns and villages. If we want to maintain and preserve them whilst protecting the inherent craft imbued in their construction, the importance of nurturing and promoting these skills should be recognised.

In the UK, the Heritage Skills Hub (HSH) push to see "traditional building skills, conservation, restoration and responsible retrofit" included within all mainstream built environment courses. In a recent conversation with Cathie Clarke, CEO of the HSH, we discussed the obstacles faced by an organisation dedicated to conserving and teaching skills like stonemasonry, roof thatching, glass making, traditional brick construction to a new generation.

Stonehenge Visitor Centre Opens its Doors

01:00 - 19 December, 2013
Stonehenge Visitor Centre Opens its Doors, © Peter Cook
© Peter Cook

After a tortuous 21-year process Stonehenge, the stone circle that is one of the world's most important neolithic artifacts, finally has the visitor centre it deserves. Denton Corker Marshall's design, situated 2.5 km (1.5 miles) to the west of the UNESCO World Heritage Site, has opened its doors and is preparing to deal with the site's nearly 1 million annual visitors.

The new design features a museum, educational facilities, a cafe, shop and a ticket office. These spaces are brought together by a perforated oversailing roof supported on 211 narrow angled columns.

Read on for more about the new Stonehenge Visitor Centre

Four Post-War UK Buildings Given Heritage Status

00:00 - 21 September, 2013
Four Post-War UK Buildings Given Heritage Status, The Spectrum Building / Foster + Partners. Image © Richard Davies, Courtesy Foster + Partners
The Spectrum Building / Foster + Partners. Image © Richard Davies, Courtesy Foster + Partners

Four post-war buildings, including the Spectrum Building by Norman Foster and Capel Manor House by Michael Manser, have been elevated to the Heritage List by the UK's Architecture and Heritage Minister Ed Vaizey. Upon announcing the news, the Minister commented that in spite of England's "fine and wonderful built heritage it's sometimes forgotten that we have many outstanding modern buildings too." His listings show that "architecture in this country is very much alive and well in the modern world."

Read more about the buildings after the break...