All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
  1. ArchDaily
  2. Drawing

Drawing: The Latest Architecture and News

Répliques

To celebrate in its own way the 100 years of the Bauhaus,
the team of illustrators in architecture “sauvarjon”
has produced 100 illustrations for which an exhibition is still in preparation.

To celebrate in its own way the 10th anniversary of the opening of the Nantes School of Architecture on the banks of the “Ile de Nantes”,
the collective offers a great illustration contest, free, open to all
around the main theme of "Replica!"
and hopes to collect 100 illustrations from different authors, which will also be the subject of an exhibition and auction during the National Days of Architecture in October 2019.

The main and only

SIZA – Unseen & Unknown

Álvaro Siza was born in 1933, on the same year that the Bauhaus closed its doors. He is perhaps the last living modernist or, at the very least, the most significant voice to carry out the unfinished modernist project all the way into the 21st century. 'Siza – Unseen & Unknown' showcases this continuity through 100 sketches, as well as its contradictions. These drawings are from his most personal archive, in addition to small collections of close friends and family. Hence, they focus not only on the professional legacy but also on the familial one, where Maria Antónia Siza (1940–1973)

Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Helps Visualize Design Concepts

Drawing as an architectural tool serves not only as a means of communication, but through drawing we can also gain a deeper understanding of the subject. To this purpose, Alessandro Luporino has created the Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture. The series of beautiful and evocative illustrations serve as companions for the book “Dictionary of Architecture,” by Nikolaus Pevsner, John Fleming, and Hugh Honor.

© Alessandro Luporino © Alessandro Luporino © Alessandro Luporino © Alessandro Luporino + 43

Add Delight to Your Drawings with The Lightbook

Though many designers today spend their working hours immersed in computer drawing programs, few would deny that hand-drawn work still holds a unique beauty. The traditional lightbox as a drafting tool has become sadly scarce in the modern architectural practice, but architecture graduate Tom Williams hopes to encourage more people to utilize them once again with his free monthly zine, The Lightbook.

Courtesy of Tom Williams Courtesy of Tom Williams Courtesy of Tom Williams Courtesy of Tom Williams + 16

Freehand Stadium Drawings by Mohammad Pirdavari

To anyone enrolled in an architecture school, final year projects tend to be the perfect time to go all in. Whether you go for 3D visualizations or build remarkable models, your final presentation is the chance to display every conceptual and technical skill acquired throughout the years.

For his B.A. Final project, architect Mohammad Pirdavari of Ati-Naghsh Hamraz Consultants, presented his modernist stadium proposal in a series of freehand Airbrush drawings. His intricate graphics helped accentuate the stadiums’ raw material and detailed relationship between the main exposed structure, and the smaller covered one.

© Mohammad Pirdavari © Mohammad Pirdavari © Mohammad Pirdavari © Mohammad Pirdavari + 31

Why Keep Drawing When Digital Tools Deliver Hyperrealistic Images?

Starting this month, ArchDaily has introduced monthly themes that we’ll explore in our stories, posts and projects. We began this month with Architectural Representation: from Archigram to Instagram; from napkins sketching to real-time-sync VR models; from academic lectures to storytellers.

It isn’t particularly novel or groundbreaking to say that the internet, social media, and design apps have challeged the relation between representation and building. A year ago we predicted that "this is just the beginning of a new stage of negotiation between the cold precision of technology and the expressive quality inherent in architecture". But, is it? Would you say digital tools are betraying creativity? This is an older dilemma than you think.

In this new edition of our Editor's Talk, four editors and curators at ArchDaily discuss drawings as pieces of art, posit why nobody cares about telephone poles on renders and explore how the building itself is becoming a type of representation.

In 'Ugly Lies the Bone' (2018), Es Devlin created a scenario that allowed the audience to look through a VR set as part of the presentation of the play. Image © Es Devlin On 'HYPER-REALITY', a short film (2016), Keiichi Matsuda envisions the aftermath of life in a city highly saturated by augmented reality, where the streets display a completely new layer of representation. Image © Keiichi Matsuda fala atelier's collage for House In Rua do Paraíso in Portugal. Image © fala atelier Google Dublin. Image © Peter Wurmli + 9

The Creative Process of Zaha Hadid, As Revealed Through Her Paintings

Vision for Madrid - 1992. Image Cortesía de Zaha Hadid
Vision for Madrid - 1992. Image Cortesía de Zaha Hadid

Internationally renowned for her avant-garde search for architectural proposals that reflect modern living, Zaha Hadid made abstract topographical studies for many of her projects, intervening with fluid, flexible and expressive works that evoke the dynamism of contemporary urban life.

In order to further knowledge of her creative process and the development of her professional projects, here we have made a historic selection of her paintings which expand the field of architectural exploration through abstract exercises in three dimensions. These artistic works propose a new and different world view, questioning the physical constraints of design, and showing the creative underpinnings of her career.

The Peak - 1983. Image Cortesía de Zaha Hadid The World (89 Degrees) - 1983. Image Cortesía de Zaha Hadid Great Utopias - 1992. Image Cortesía de Zaha Hadid Hafenstrasse Development. Image Cortesía de Zaha Hadid + 34

In Praise of Drawing: A Case for the Underrated Craft

© Jim Keen
© Jim Keen

I was part of the last generation of architectural students who didn't use computers (we’re only talking the early 1990’s here; there was electricity, color TV’s, rockets, just no renderings.) In my final year at college I miscalculated how long it would take me to finish my thesis project. As the deadline approached, I realized it was too late for me to match my fellow students’ presentations. At the time Zaha Hadid, and her deconstructivist paintings, set the style for architectural illustration. That meant many student projects being rendered in oil paints on large canvases.

BDA Prize 2019: INVISIBLE C'VILLE

The BDA Prize, an annual design and ideas competition, exists to generate forward-looking ideas to better our community through design and dialogue.

This Week in Architecture: More than Visual

Architecture is a profession deeply dependent on the visual. It’s imagined, sold, critiqued and consumed almost entirely on the strength (or lack thereof) of drawings. We pick and prod at images presented at angles we’ll never be able to see, admiring the architectonic qualities of elements we’ll never actually experience.

World Architecture Festival Announces Winners of the 2018 Drawing Prize

The World Architecture Festival, with co-curators Make Architects and the Sir John Soane’s Museum, announced today the winners of their annual Architecture Drawing Prize, established in 2017 to recognize the “continuing importance of hand drawing, whilst also embracing the creative use of digitally produced renderings.”

Drawing Tips for Getting the Most Out of Your Apple Pencil

Want to get the most of your Apple Pencil in Trace? Today, Rome Prize winner Javier Galindo, is going to show you a few features that will make your Trace drawings sing.

"Post-Digital" Drawing Valorizes the Ordinary and Renders it to Look Like the Past

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "Can’t Be Bothered: The Chic Indifference of Post-Digital Drawing."

In architectural circles, the appellation “post-digital” has come to mean many things to many people. Some have used it as a shorthand descriptor for the trendy style of rendering that has become popular among students and, increasingly, architectural offices. Others have used it to describe a more profound shift in architectural production that is at once inoculated against the novelty of digital technique and attuned to the sheer ubiquity of “the digital” in contemporary life.

DOGMA’s Stop City (2007) polemically juxtaposed massive monoliths against traditional urban forms. Image Courtesy of DOGMA Garage House. Image Courtesy of Fala Atelier Chiado Apartment. Image Courtesy of Fala Atelier Graça Apartment. Image Courtesy of Fala Atelier + 7

Learn About Open Floor Plans Via These 6 Iconic Residences

Le Corbusier's "Five Points of Architecture" functioned in the twentieth century as the go-to guide for architectural production; it is also a significant work in understanding the legacy of modern architecture. Horizontal windows, free design of the facade, pilotis, roof gardens, and perhaps the most significant point, free design of the ground plan form the Franco-Swiss architect's manifesto. In terms of design practice, this last point means distinguishing structure and wrapper, which allows the free disposal of dividing walls that no longer fulfill a structural function.

Residential projects were once characterized by a clear division of environments linked to domestic dynamics, now filtered by modern discourse, the house became flexible and capable of new spatial articulations.

To better understand the modern domestic space, we gathered some of the most emblematic examples of residences and their floor plans.

The Importance of the Section in Architectural Representation and Practice

Architectural comprehension as a field deals with representation as a synthesis of varied efforts - constructive, compositional, spatial, and technical qualities - which are then articulated in the constructed building. For this purpose, it is essential to think about the graphic representation that presupposes all these efforts, since it is both a procedure and a product of architectural design.

Award-Winning Sketching App 'Concepts' Releases New Update Including Customized Brushes

Courtesy of David Clynk
Courtesy of David Clynk

Being a 21st-century designer is not always a walk in the park, but it certainly has its perks. Fortunately, innovative product and software designers have created numerous programs that transform our ideas and visions into visual and tangible reality.

Concepts, the “next-generation design platform” is an iOS application, suitable for all design and engineering fields. Accommodating almost 80% of all design tasks, product designers, fashion designers, game designers, and industrial engineers can benefit from what the application has to offer. The TopHatch creation - which is trusted by leading designers at Disney, Apple, Nike, PlayStation, Unity, and several other leading corporations - was initiated as a simple prototype, and gradually built on feedback and innovative updates.

Following our Top Apps for Architects article, the award-winning vector-based app, is launching a brand new update, with exclusive features that enable a limitless, customized, and more precise creative experience, exclusively shared with ArchDaily readers.

What’s New?

Courtesy of Concepts Courtesy of Concepts Courtesy of Concepts Courtesy of Concepts + 16

Toshiko Mori Pursues Dialogue That Transcends Time and Space

Continuing their Time-Space-Existence series of monthly videos leading up to this year’s Venice Biennale, PLANE—SITE have released a new conversation with architect and former Harvard GSD chair of architecture Toshiko Mori. Each video highlights the ideas that drive the work of well-known designers, with this episode focusing on Mori’s philosophy of visual communication, dialogue with history and considering the future in her work.

Courtesy of Tashiko Mori Architect © Paul Warchol © Hiroshi Abe © Iwan Baan + 15

Tishk Barzanji's Illustrations Envision Complex Universes Inspired By Surrealism And Modern Architecture

It is rare to find artists who can instigate critical reflection on architecture by combining references such as 'The Red Wall' (La Muralla Roja) by Ricardo Boffil, with the complex illustrations of Giovanni Battista Piranesi and pop culture icons. But Tishk Barzanji, a London artist, is one who does.

Through his digital illustrations, he explores elements of modern architecture from a filtered view by using references that create a dreamlike and surreal universe, producing compositions that express an austere and somewhat disturbing atmosphere.