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Design

What It’s Like to be an Architect who Doesn’t Design Buildings

06:00 - 6 April, 2018
What It’s Like to be an Architect who Doesn’t Design Buildings, Han Zhang along with her team at <a href="http://www.archdaily.cn">ArchDaily China</a>. Image Courtesy of Han Zhang
Han Zhang along with her team at ArchDaily China. Image Courtesy of Han Zhang

There's an old, weary tune that people sing to caution against being an architect: the long years of academic training, the studio work that takes away from sleep, and the small job market in which too many people are vying for the same positions. When you finally get going, the work is trying as well. Many spend months or even years working on the computer and doing models before seeing any of the designs become concrete. If you're talking about the grind, architects know this well enough from their training, and this time of ceaseless endeavor in the workplace only adds to that despair.

Which is why more and more architects are branching out. Better hours, more interesting opportunities, and a chance to do more than just build models. Furthermore, the skills you learn as an architect, such as being sensitive to space, and being able to grasp the cultural and societal demands of a place, can be put to use in rather interesting ways. Here, 3 editors at ArchDaily talk about being an architect, why they stopped designing buildings, and what they do in their work now. 

Architecture's "Dark Products": What Do Architects Claim Ownership of in the Design Process?

09:30 - 4 April, 2018
Architecture's "Dark Products": What Do Architects Claim Ownership of in the Design Process?, Courtesy of Curtis Roth
Courtesy of Curtis Roth

Why do we build? How do we build? Who do we ultimately build for? These have been questions that have dominated the worlds of both practice and pedagogy since the early ages of architecture. On a basic level, those questions can be answered almost reflexively, with a formulaic response. But is it time to look beyond just the simple why, how, and who?

In a world where the physical processes of architecture are becoming increasingly less important and digital processes proliferate through all phases of architectural ideas and documentation, we should perhaps be looking to understand the ways in which architects work, and examine how we can claim the processes—not just the products—of our labors.

Populous to Collaborate on Design of North America's First eSports Stadium

08:00 - 29 March, 2018
Populous to Collaborate on Design of North America's First eSports Stadium, Courtesy of Populous
Courtesy of Populous

Last week, the City of Arlington, Texas announced plans to collaborate with Populous in transforming the city’s convention center into North America’s first Esports Stadium. This 100,000-square-foot venue will be designed to draw in both competitive players and fans from around the world, and create the most immersive experience in the live esports market.

Greek Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Biennale to Explore Utopian Visions of Learning

14:00 - 18 March, 2018
Greek Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Biennale to Explore Utopian Visions of Learning , Courtesy of Neiheiser Argyros
Courtesy of Neiheiser Argyros

As part of our 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale coverage we present the proposal for the Greek Pavilion. Below, the participants describe their contribution in their own words. 

Xristina Argyros and Ryan Neiheiser have been selected to curate the exhibition of the Greek Pavilion in the 16th International Architecture Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia - under the general theme “Freespace,” commissioned by Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara. Entitled “The School of Athens,” the project will examine the architecture of the academic commons - from Plato’s Academy to contemporary university designs. The selection was made by The Greek Ministry of Environment and Energy and the Secretary-General of Spatial Planning and Urban Design, Eirini Klampatsea. 

Turkey's Entry to the 2018 Venice Biennale to Offer Space for Creative Encounter

14:00 - 17 March, 2018
Turkey's Entry to the 2018 Venice Biennale to Offer Space for Creative Encounter, Courtesy of İKSV
Courtesy of İKSV

As part of our 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale coverage we present the proposal for the Turkish Pavilion. Below, the participants describe their contribution in their own words. 

Curated by Kerem Piker and coordinated by Istanbul Foundation for Culture and Arts (İKSV), the Pavilion of Turkey will present Vardiya (the Shift) at the 16th International Architecture Exhibition of la Biennale di Venezia, taking place from May 26th to November 25th, 2018. Co-sponsored by Schüco Turkey and VitrA, the Pavilion of Turkey is located at Sale d’Armi, Arsenale, one of the main venues of the Biennale.

Conceived in response to the theme of Freespace, the title of the Biennale Architettura 2018, Vardiya offers a programme of public events with the Pavilion of Turkey, providing an open space for encounter, exhibition and production.

Nordic Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Biennale to Explore Nature's Relationship to the Built Environment

16:00 - 16 March, 2018
Nordic Pavilion at the 2018 Venice Biennale to Explore Nature's Relationship to the Built Environment, Courtesy of Maurizio Mucciola
Courtesy of Maurizio Mucciola

As part of our 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale coverage we present the proposal for the Nordic Pavilion. Below, the participants describe their contribution in their own words. 

Finnish architect Lundén Architecture Company has been chosen to design the Nordic contribution to the 2018 International Architecture Exhibition in Venice. Eero Lundén’s proposal, entitled Another Generosity, explores the relationship between nature and the built environment.

The goal is to explore new ways of making buildings that emphasise the delicate but often invisible interactions between the built and natural worlds.

Caruso St. John to Construct Public Piazza on the Roof of the British Pavilion for 2018 Venice Biennale

14:00 - 9 March, 2018
Caruso St. John to Construct Public Piazza on the Roof of the British Pavilion for 2018 Venice Biennale, Holy Rosary Church at Shettihalli. Image Courtesy of Bhaskar Dutta
Holy Rosary Church at Shettihalli. Image Courtesy of Bhaskar Dutta

As part of our 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale coverage we present the proposal for the British Pavilion. Find the curator statement below.

The British Pavilion for the 2018 Venice Biennale, entitled 'Island', was curated by Stirling Prize-winning Carusco St John Architects, working in collaboration with artist Marcus Taylor. Responding to the Biennale theme of ‘Freespace’ set by curators Yvonne Farrell and Shelley McNamara of Grafton Architects, ‘Island’ sees the construction of a new public piazza on the roof of the British Pavilion, leaving the building below empty of exhibits.

At the piazza's centre, the Pavilion’s roof protrudes upwards through the floor to represent both an island, and an undiscovered world beneath. The programme for the British Pavilion sees a series of events including poetry, performance, film and debate, all interpreting interpretations of ‘Island’ and ‘Freespace’.

Saudi Arabia's Inaugural Entry to the 2018 Venice Biennale to Focus on Design Process

16:00 - 4 March, 2018
Saudi Arabia's Inaugural Entry to the 2018 Venice Biennale to Focus on Design Process, Riyadh Skyline. Image © <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Riyadh_Skyline_showing_the_King_Abdullah_Financial_District_(KAFD)_and_the_famous_Kingdom_Tower_.jpg'>Wikimedia user B.alotaby </a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/deed.en'> CC BY-SA 4.0</a>
Riyadh Skyline. Image © Wikimedia user B.alotaby licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0

As part of our 2018 Venice Architecture Biennale coverage we present the proposal for the Saudi Arabia Pavilion. Below, the participants describe their contribution in their own words.

The first Saudi participation at the International Architecture Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia will be located in the Arsenale and will feature an exhibition commissioned by the Misk Art Institute under the theme of “Un/Design.”

How to Use “Structured Procrastination” to Get the Best Out of Your Bad Habits

09:30 - 13 November, 2017
How to Use “Structured Procrastination” to Get the Best Out of Your Bad Habits, © Andrea Vasquez
© Andrea Vasquez

In a hilarious TED talk by world-famous blogger Tim Urban, the procrastinating brain is explained using three squiggly characters: Rational Decision Maker, Instant Gratification Monkey, and Panic Monster. For most of us who procrastinate without fail, the Monkey dominates while the Decision Maker suffers. Panic Monster enters the moment a deadline looms dangerously close—and that’s when all the actual work is done, amid much grumbling, self-loathing and lofty promises of never procrastinating again. But of course, we fail to keep our promises and the wheel keeps turning!

While the internet is full of lists and guides on how to stop procrastinating, for quite a lot of people, those somehow just don’t help at all. And while deadlines, as Urban points out, work for some in terms of getting the work done sooner or later, “long-term procrastination” affects those who must set their own deadlines—think business owners, PhD students, or freelancers. So, how do you get yourself to stop? You don’t! What you need to master is John Perry’s concept of “structured procrastination”—the same concept that Piers Steel earlier explained as “productive procrastination.” Read on for some advice gleaned from pro-procrastination literature.

Cooper Hewitt Releases Online Catalogue of Over 200,000 Historic Design Objects

14:00 - 28 October, 2017
Cooper Hewitt Releases Online Catalogue of Over 200,000 Historic Design Objects, Trans ... Armchair, 2007; Designed by Fernando Campana and Humberto Campana; Brazil; Commissioned to designers by Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum. Image © Cooper Hewitt - Smithsonian Design Museum
Trans ... Armchair, 2007; Designed by Fernando Campana and Humberto Campana; Brazil; Commissioned to designers by Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum. Image © Cooper Hewitt - Smithsonian Design Museum

The Cooper Hewitt Museum, also known as the Smithsonian Design Museum, has completed a digitization of its expansive collection dedicated to the field of design that spans thirty centuries and more than 220,000 objects. Now, the collection has been made available on its online page.

In Residence: Inside Mattia Bonetti's Home on Lake Lugano

14:00 - 27 August, 2017

Unfortunately, I think that there is a big uniformity all over the world that makes everything very, very similar and very impersonal – very little imagination, I think. I guess it resembled me, this house, somehow.

This video from NOWNESSIn Residence series features Swiss furniture designer Mattia Bonetti in his home on Lake Lugano. Bonetti is based in Paris but maintains this home in his birthplace: Lugano, Switzerland. Designing furniture since 1979, Bonetti is known for his vibrant designs, often full of historical allusions and in contrast to his subdued persona. In the video, the artist and designer mention that some of the home’s accessories were handmade by Bonetti himself.

Continue reading to learn about Bonetti's inspirations in restoring and adding to his lakeside home.

Step Into a Movie Dreamworld With "Accidental Wes Anderson" on Reddit

09:30 - 20 August, 2017
Lighthouse in Húsavík, Iceland. Image <a href='https://www.reddit.com/r/AccidentalWesAnderson/comments/6lg9c1/i_took_this_picture_of_a_lighthouse_in_h%C3%BAsav%C3%ADk/'>via Reddit user Milonade</a>
Lighthouse in Húsavík, Iceland. Image via Reddit user Milonade

If you ever have those moments where you take a step back from your life and feel like you’ve suddenly fallen into a scene from a movie, you may appreciate the subreddit /r/AccidentalWesAnderson. Director, producer, screenwriter, and actor Wes Anderson is well known for creating scenes in his films that blur the lines between the real and the unreal. His extreme symmetry and restricted color palettes can often give the impression of a surreal, self-contained world. The purpose of the Accidental Wes Anderson subreddit is for users to post photos of real-world architecture and scenes they’ve stumbled upon that look like they could be stills from one of Anderson’s movies, with Redditors finding Anderson-esque scenes around the globe in everything from bathrooms to staircases to city streets. Even a viewer unfamiliar with Anderson’s films can browse the collection of photos and easily understand his aesthetic. Below is just a small selection of some of the most evocative photos to be found on the subreddit.

Inside a tower in Pisa, Italy. Image <a href='http://i.imgur.com/m2b3P4d.jpg'>via Reddit user LaTalpa123</a> Homes in Vietnam. Image <a href='https://www.reddit.com/r/AccidentalWesAnderson/comments/6lqh6q/homes_in_vietnam/'>via Reddit user temporality</a> Tin Mal Mosque, Morocco. Image <a href='https://i.imgur.com/BeNYBsu.jpg'>via Reddit user that-there</a> Swimming Hall in Gotha, Germany. Image <a href='https://www.reddit.com/r/AccidentalWesAnderson/comments/6sswkz/swimminghall_in_gotha_germany/'>via Reddit user Teillu</a> + 12

Made With Love, Literally: 3D Printing Your Emotions Into Gold

14:00 - 4 June, 2017

Brazil-based architects Estudio Guto Requena, working with digital product studio D3, has launched an app that collects emotions to create a unique piece of jewelry. That, and some 3D-printed craftsmanship direct from the design you generate via their new app. Coined the Aura Pendant, the final product is an intricately woven golden pendant that can be gifted to yourself or a loved one.

Courtesy of © 2016 Estudio Guto Requena Courtesy of © 2016 Estudio Guto Requena Courtesy of © 2016 Estudio Guto Requena Courtesy of © 2016 Estudio Guto Requena + 9

Granite - The Great Contemporary Unknown

12:00 - 1 May, 2017
Granite - The Great Contemporary Unknown, University Library of Vigo Alberto Noguerol & Pilar Diez Architects. Image Courtesy of Cluster del Granito
University Library of Vigo Alberto Noguerol & Pilar Diez Architects. Image Courtesy of Cluster del Granito

Rediscover a natural, unique and original material, with multiple applications for current architecture and design immovable over time, granite is a jewel of nature capable of providing exclusivity to any contemporary construction or finish. Its wide range of varieties and the incorporation of new cutting technologies and those giving a surface finish, provide us with infinite design possibilities.

How to use a Scrum Board to Maximize Personal and Team Productivity

09:30 - 10 April, 2017
How to use a Scrum Board to Maximize Personal and Team Productivity, via Isabella Baranyk
via Isabella Baranyk

If you're reading this, you likely work in the design world, and as a result you may have heard of Scrum. It’s a design method originally introduced by Hirotaka Takeuchi and Ikujiro Nonaka in the 1980s to describe a process for product development, and later formalized for software development by Jeff Sutherland in 1995. It relies on the organization of a team and its tasks around the principles of focus and flexibility: focus on a singular task within a given time period, and flexibility in response to changing client demand, user feedback, and design challenges. Scrum keeps a project on schedule with the Sprint, where the entire team is working towards one important milestone within set dates, and continuously communicating potential impediments to hitting the deadline.

11 Architecture, Design and Urbanism Podcasts to Start Listening to Now

07:15 - 5 April, 2017
11 Architecture, Design and Urbanism Podcasts to Start Listening to Now

It can sometimes feel as if the world is divided into two camps: those who do not listen to podcasts (probably because they don’t know what a podcast is) and those who listen to podcasts, love podcasts, and keep badgering their friends for recommendations so they can start listening to even more.

Unlike other media, it’s notoriously difficult to discover and share podcasts – even more so if you’re looking for a podcast on a niche subject like architecture, design or urbanism. To help you in your hour of need, Metropolis’ Vanessa Quirk (author of Guide to Podcasting) and ArchDaily’s James Taylor-Foster (whose silvery tones you may have heard on various architecture and design audio stories) have come together to compile this list of eleven podcasts you should subscribe to.

John Pawson Narrates a Tour Through London's New Design Museum

05:30 - 16 November, 2016

This edition of Section DMonocle 24's weekly review of design, architecture and craft, explores London's new Design Museum – a significant expansion for the institution at an entirely new location in West London. The interior spaces of the former Commonwealth Institute Building in Kensington, which is Grade II-listed, have been renovated by John Pawson. Alongside the museum’s Deputy Director, Alice Black, the Monocle team investigate the thinking behind the relaunch and how the spaces are designed to accommodate a shifting audience.

The World’s Most Prominent Kitchen Design Contest Is Now Accepting Entries

06:00 - 8 November, 2016
The World’s Most Prominent Kitchen Design Contest Is Now Accepting Entries, “Mountain Bliss” designed by Mikal Otten, Exquisite Kitchen Design, Denver, CO. First Place award for Transitional style, 2013-2014 Kitchen Design Contest. Image Courtesy of Sub-Zero and Wolf
“Mountain Bliss” designed by Mikal Otten, Exquisite Kitchen Design, Denver, CO. First Place award for Transitional style, 2013-2014 Kitchen Design Contest. Image Courtesy of Sub-Zero and Wolf

"When it comes to distinguished contests, Sub-Zero and Wolf’s Kitchen Design Contest is the crème de la crème", says Mikal Otten, owner of Exquisite Kitchen Design, Denver, CO. "Since winning the first place global award for Transitional styling, we’ve gained a tremendous amount of credibility."