All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions
  1. ArchDaily
  2. Brutalist

Brutalist: The Latest Architecture and News

Concrete Melbourne Map: Guide map to Melbourne's concrete and Brutalist architecture

13:17 - 27 June, 2019
Concrete Melbourne Map: Guide map to Melbourne's concrete and Brutalist architecture

Two-sided guide featuring a map of Melbourne’s finest concrete and Brutalist buildings. The reverse includes details for fifty buildings, an introduction by Glenn Harper, the editor of Blue Crow Media's Brutalist Sydney Map, and original photography by Clinton Weaver.

Eastern Blocks: Concrete Landscapes of the Former Eastern Bloc

12:30 - 23 April, 2019
Eastern Blocks: Concrete Landscapes of the Former Eastern Bloc, Eastern Blocks by Zupagrafika
Eastern Blocks by Zupagrafika

‘Sleeping districts’ of Moscow, Plattenbauten of East Berlin, modernist estates of Warsaw, Kyiv`s Brezhnevki: although these are home to the vast majority of city dwellers, post-war suburbs of central and eastern Europe have been invisible for decades.

Brutal Britain: Build Your Own Brutalist Great Britain

11:37 - 11 December, 2018
Brutal Britain: Build Your Own Brutalist Great Britain, Brutal Britain by Zupagrafika
Brutal Britain by Zupagrafika

High-rise tower blocks, prefab panel housing estates, streets in the sky, new towns; some of the concrete constructions that once shaped the cityscapes of post-war Britain have stood the test of time, while others are long gone.

‘Brutal Britain’ by Zupagrafika (also author of ‘Brutal London’) celebrates the brutalist architecture of the British Isles, inviting readers to explore the Modern past of Great Britain and rebuild some of its most intriguing post-war edifices, from the iconic slabs of Sheffield`s Park Hill and experimental tower blocks at Cotton Gardens in London, to the demolished Birmingham Central Library.

Opening with a foreword by architectural

Atlas of Brutalist Architecture

14:37 - 19 September, 2018
Atlas of Brutalist Architecture

This is the only book to thoroughly document the world's finest examples of Brutalist architecture. More than 850 buildings - existing and demolished, classic and contemporary - are organized geographically into nine continental regions.

878 Buildings, 798 Architects, 102 Countries, 9 World Regions, 1 Style BRUTALISM. Presented in an oversized format with a specially bound case with three-dimensional finishes, 1000 beautiful duotone photographs throughout bring the graphic strength, emotional power, and compelling architectural presence of Brutalism to life.

From Marcel Breuer to Oscar Neimeyer and David Chipperfield to Zaha Hadid, this volume includes works by both classic and contemporary architects.

Celebrate Ukraine's Soviet Brutalist Architecture with this New Short Film

08:00 - 24 July, 2018

The fall of the Iron Curtain in 1991 came not only with political, economic, and social implications but also left behind a distinctive style of architecture. This architecture, under the Soviet regime, was a system which relied on quantifiable targets, such as the Five Year Plan. These quotas forced architects to evaluate building projects in terms of material and labor costs, number of units, volume of skilled and unskilled labor, and so forth. As a result, architecture across these regions became an industrial commodity, an outward flex of power and technological innovation, and a collective of architects executing a Stalinist vision.

MoMA to Host Exhibit Celebrating the Radical Brutalist Architecture of Socialist Yugoslavia

08:00 - 6 July, 2018
MoMA to Host Exhibit Celebrating the Radical Brutalist Architecture of Socialist Yugoslavia, Berislav Šerbetić and Vojin Bakić. Monument to the Uprising of the People of Kordun and Banija. 1979–81. Petrova Gora, Croatia. Exterior view. Photo: Valentin Jeck, commissioned by The Museum of Modern Art, 2016
Berislav Šerbetić and Vojin Bakić. Monument to the Uprising of the People of Kordun and Banija. 1979–81. Petrova Gora, Croatia. Exterior view. Photo: Valentin Jeck, commissioned by The Museum of Modern Art, 2016

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) is set to open a new exhibition exploring the architecture of the former country of Yugoslavia. Toward a Concrete Utopia: Architecture in Yugoslavia, 1948–1980 will be the first exhibition in the United States to honor the peculiar architecture of the former socialist nation.

More than 400 drawings, models, photographs, and film reels culled from an array of municipal archives, family-held collections, and museums across the region will be presented to an international audience for the first time. Toward a Concrete Utopia will feature works by many of Yugoslavia's leading architects. It will explore "large-scale urbanization, technological experimentation and its application in everyday life, consumerism, monuments and memorialization, and the global reach of Yugoslav architecture."

Read on for more about the exhibition and Yugoslav brutalism.

 Svetlana Kana Radević. Podgorica Hotel. 1964–67. Podgorica, Montenegro. Exterior view of the balconies. Photo: Valentin Jeck, commissioned by The Museum of Modern Art, 2016 odrag Živković and Đorđe Zloković. Monument to the Battle of the Sutjeska. 1965–71, Tjentište, Bosnia and Herzegovina. Photo: Valentin Jeck, commissioned by The Museum of Modern Art, 2016  Vjenceslav Richter. Yugoslav Pavilion at Expo 58. 1958. Brussels, Belgium. Archive of Yugoslavia Andrija Mutnjaković. National and University Library of Kosovo. 1971–82. Prishtina, Kosovo. Exterior view. Photo: Valentin Jeck, commissioned by the Museum of Modern Art, 2016 + 15

Architecture Initiative Transforms Derelict Brutalist Northampton Landmark into Mixed-Use Academy

08:00 - 5 February, 2017
Architecture Initiative Transforms Derelict Brutalist Northampton Landmark into Mixed-Use Academy, Proposed public plaza at night. Image Courtesy of Architecture Initiative
Proposed public plaza at night. Image Courtesy of Architecture Initiative

London-based firm Architecture Initiative has released updates of their mixed-use scheme set to transform a neglected brutalist building in Northampton, England. The Northampton International Academy, currently an abandoned Royal Mail sorting office, will be centered around educational, commercial, and community use. The scheme aims to address a need for school places in a manner which contributes to the economic regeneration of the local area.

Public plaza and facilities. Image Courtesy of Architecture Initiative Voids allow natural light deep into the building. Image Courtesy of Architecture Initiative Existing concrete structure is retained. Image Courtesy of Architecture Initiative Work began on site in September 2016. Image Courtesy of Architecture Initiative + 22

New Map Celebrates Washington D.C's Brutalist Architecture

08:00 - 14 October, 2016
New Map Celebrates Washington D.C's Brutalist Architecture, © Deane Madsen
© Deane Madsen

City Guide publisher Blue Crow Media and Deane Madsen, Associate Editor of Design at Architect Magazine, have collaborated to produce the Brutalist Washington Map, which features 40 examples of Brutalist architecture in Washington, D.C. This is Blue Crowe's fourth architectural guide map, following their Brutalist London Map, Art Deco London Map, and Constructivist Moscow Map. One can only expect further releases on the horizon.

© Deane Madsen © Deane Madsen © Deane Madsen © Deane Madsen + 13

Utopia Photo Series Captures London’s Brutalist Architecture

06:00 - 7 April, 2016
Utopia Photo Series Captures London’s Brutalist Architecture, © Studio Esinam / Rory Gardiner
© Studio Esinam / Rory Gardiner

Studio Esinam, in collaboration with London-based photographer Rory Gardiner, has released Utopia, a photo series that captures and pays tribute to London’s Brutalist architecture. The series aims to “highlight the subtle beauties hidden beneath the hard surface of some of London’s brutalist buildings.”

Photographed during the early spring of 2016, the project captures some of the city’s best examples of Brutalism: the Barbican Estate, Royal National Theatre, Hayward Gallery, Trellick Tower, and the Robin Hood Gardens.

© Studio Esinam / Rory Gardiner © Studio Esinam / Rory Gardiner © Studio Esinam / Rory Gardiner © Studio Esinam / Rory Gardiner + 22

Brutal Utopias: A National Trust Celebration of Brutalist Architecture: Brutalist Britain by Routemaster

19:30 - 14 September, 2015
Brutal Utopias: A National Trust Celebration of Brutalist Architecture: Brutalist Britain by Routemaster

A tour of Brutalist architecture in London aboard the National Trust’s 1962 Routemaster Coach. Led by architectural and cultural experts Tom Cordell and Joe Kerr, the tours explore the emergence and development of Brutalism in the city.

Hawkins\Brown Selected to Design the University of Reading's New School of Architecture

11:30 - 19 June, 2015
Hawkins\Brown Selected to Design the University of Reading's New School of Architecture , © Hawkins\Brown
© Hawkins\Brown

Hawkins\Brown has been chosen to design the new School of Architecture for the University of Reading in Reading, Berkshire, in the United Kingdom. The new School “will be housed in a retrofitted 1970’s concrete brutalist building originally designed by Howell, Killick, Partridge & Amis,” which is currently the University’s School of Construction Management and Engineering. Brutalist buildings, like the Prentice Women’s Hospital and the Preston Bus Station are continuously at risk of being demolished, which makes this retrofit all the more valuable. While the University seeks to modernize the building and improve efficiency, they also plan to respect the original design. Construction is set to begin in January 2017 and wrap up by December 2018. Learn more about the project here.

The A-Z of Brutalism

00:00 - 14 February, 2014
The A-Z of Brutalism, © Andy Spain
© Andy Spain

The Guardian’s Jonathan Meades has named the “incredible hulks” of Brutalism with a thought provoking A-Z list that ranges from Hans Asplund, who coined the term “nybrutalism,” to California’s fascination with Zapotec-like adornments in the 1960s. Read the list in full and discover why Quebec City, Yugoslavia’s Janko Konstantinov, and Danish architect Jørn Utzon are all considered incredible hulks here.