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Broadacre City

When Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier Had a Public Argument in The New York Times

09:30 - 26 May, 2017
When Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier Had a Public Argument in The New York Times, Left: Frank Lloyd Wright photographed by Al Ravenna. Image <a href='https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Frank_Lloyd_Wright_portrait.jpg'>via Wikimedia</a> in Public Domain. Right: Le Corbusier. Image © Willy Rizzo
Left: Frank Lloyd Wright photographed by Al Ravenna. Image via Wikimedia in Public Domain. Right: Le Corbusier. Image © Willy Rizzo

Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier are both architects who were known for their grand and innovative ideas—as well as for their high esteem for their own opinions. The two did not, however, see eye to eye in their visions for the future of American cities and civilization. Both architects had utopian, all-encompassing plans for their ideal American city, combining social as well as architectural ideas. In 1932, both described these ideas in The New York Times; in these two articles Frank Lloyd Wright and Le Corbusier made their differing beliefs perfectly clear to the public.