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21 Projects Where Kengo Kuma (Re)Uses Materials in Unusual Ways

04:00 - 30 May, 2019
21 Projects Where Kengo Kuma (Re)Uses Materials in Unusual Ways, Mont-Blanc Base Camp / Kengo Kuma & Associates. Image Courtesy of Kengo Kuma and Associates
Mont-Blanc Base Camp / Kengo Kuma & Associates. Image Courtesy of Kengo Kuma and Associates

Kengo Kuma uses materials to connect with the local context and the users of his projects. The textures and elementary forms of constructive systems, materials, and products, are exhibited and used in favor of the architectural concept, giving value to the functions that will be carried out in each building.

From showcases made with ceramic tiles to the sifted light created by expanded metal panels, passing through an ethereal polyester coating, Kuma understands the material as an essential component that can make a difference in architecture from the design stages. Next, we present 21 projects where Kengo Kuma masterfully uses construction materials.

ArchDaily's Sustainability Glossary : D-E-F

07:00 - 22 May, 2019
ArchDaily's Sustainability Glossary : D-E-F, © ArchDaily
© ArchDaily

It is expected that within the next few of decades, Earth will have absolutely nothing left to offer whoever/whatever is capable of surviving on it. Although the human race is solely responsible for the damages done to the planet, a thin silver lining can still be seen if radical changes were to be done to the way we live on Earth and how we sustain it.

Upcycling Wood: Disused Materials Transformed Into Valuable And Useful Objects

07:00 - 17 May, 2019
Upcycling Wood: Disused Materials Transformed Into Valuable And Useful Objects, 'Taburetes Sociales'. Design by Curro Claret, Arrels Fundació and collaborators. Image © Juan Lemus
'Taburetes Sociales'. Design by Curro Claret, Arrels Fundació and collaborators. Image © Juan Lemus

The need to substantially reduce our impact on the planet must be translated into a significant change to our lifestyle and habits. One of these is to consume responsibly and consider that waste does not exist, but that all material can be transformed into something useful again following a circular ecological system.

Valldaura Labs Rehabilitation / Guallart Architects

10:00 - 10 May, 2019
Valldaura Labs Rehabilitation / Guallart Architects, © Adrià Goula
© Adrià Goula

Valldaura Labs is a project to create a Self-Sufficient Habitat Laboratory.promoted by the Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia. It is located in the center of the Metropolitan Area of ​​Barcelona, ​​in the Park natural of Collserola.

What to Know Before Tackling a Renovation Project

06:30 - 9 May, 2019
What to Know Before Tackling a Renovation Project, Battersea Arts Centre by Haworth Tompkins. Image © Fred Howarth
Battersea Arts Centre by Haworth Tompkins. Image © Fred Howarth

As technology moves forward, so does architecture and construction. Architects, designers, and planners around the world now have infinite tools and resources to design and build the cities of today and the future.  As promising as this may sound, new construction is also consuming our world’s limited resources faster than we can replenish them.

ArchDaily Topics - May: Use & Reuse

12:00 - 8 May, 2019
ArchDaily Topics - May: Use & Reuse, Courtesy of ArchDaily
Courtesy of ArchDaily

“The greenest building is the one that is already built." (Carl Elefante, FAIA)

Rethinking Sacred Spaces for New Purposes

04:00 - 7 May, 2019
Rethinking Sacred Spaces for New Purposes, © Stijn Poelstra
© Stijn Poelstra

In the wake of the recent fires at Paris’ Notre Dame and the Al-Aqsa mosque in Jerusalem, we have seen many architects propose new ways of rebuilding these sacred spaces, opening them up to new possibilities.

Historically, after the decline of the Catholic Church and the increasing loss of faith in several locations in Europe and in North America, the maintenance costs and the disuse of sacred spaces has led to the eventual abandonment of churches, shrines and monasteries with great architectural and historical value.

This opens a new opportunity for investors and architects to rescue and re-contextualize the historical heritage of these buildings. Below we present 15 examples of adaptive reuse in ancient churches--transformed into hotels, homes, museums, libraries and other cultural spaces.

ArchDaily's Sustainability Glossary : A-B-C

07:00 - 30 April, 2019
ArchDaily's Sustainability Glossary : A-B-C , © ArchDaily
© ArchDaily

It is expected that within the next couple of decades, Earth will have absolutely nothing left to offer whoever/whatever is capable of surviving on it. Although the human race is solely responsible for the damages done to the planet, a thin silver lining can still be seen if radical changes were to be done to the way we live on Earth and how we sustain it. 

How To Recycle Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) To Turn it Into Paint

05:00 - 14 March, 2019
How To Recycle Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) To Turn it Into Paint, Cortesía de Idea-Tec
Cortesía de Idea-Tec

Expanded polystyrene (EPS) is a plastic material widely used for thermal insulation (and in some cases, acoustics) in building envelopes.

The Beauty in the Imperfections of Ruins in Architecture

05:00 - 19 February, 2019
The Beauty in the Imperfections of Ruins in Architecture, © José Hevia
© José Hevia

If walls could speak, they would have the most stories to tell - stories of antiquity, war, scandal, and reconciliation. Approaches to preservation are as varied as the architects behind them, but many take on the challenge with flair and restraint in equal measure. It is common to see preservation that combines ancient structure with contemporary features, creating beautiful combinations of old and new.

Why Reusing Buildings Should - and Must - be the Next Big Thing

08:00 - 22 January, 2019
Why Reusing Buildings Should - and Must - be the Next Big Thing, LocHal / Mecanoo. Image © Ossip van Duivenbode
LocHal / Mecanoo. Image © Ossip van Duivenbode

Sustainability awards and standards touted by professional architecture organizations often stop at opening day, failing to take into account the day-to-day energy use of a building. With the current format unlikely to change, how can we rethink the way what sustainability means in architecture today? The first step might be to stop rewarding purpose-built architecture, and look instead to the buildings we already have. This article was originally published on CommonEdge as"Why Reusing Buildings Should be the Next Big Thing."

This Week in Architecture: Reduce, Reuse, Rethink

09:00 - 24 November, 2018
This Week in Architecture: Reduce, Reuse, Rethink, © Leonardo Finotti
© Leonardo Finotti

It's easy to feel overwhelmed by the massive production of architecture today. Scroll through ArchDaily for more than a minute and even we'd forgive you for losing track of it all. But what seems like an endless scroll of architectural production doesn't quite fit with the popular movements surrounding resource sharing and community.