Lincoln Barbour

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Vista North Pearl Condominiums / Bora Architects

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  • Architects: Bora Architects
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  350000 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2018

Flatiron Office Building / Works Partnership Architecture

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Putting Wood on a Pedestal: The Rise of Mid-Rise Podium Design

Podium construction – alternately known as platform or pedestal construction – is a building typology characterized by a horizontal division between a lower ‘podium’ and an upper tower. The podium, which is typically made of concrete or steel, is crowned by multiple light wood-frame stories. Often, the lighter upper structure contains four to five stories of residential units, while the podium houses retail, commercial, or office spaces and above- or below-grade parking. An alternative configuration sports six to seven residential stories (including the podium) and subterranean parking. Some visible examples of this podium construction style include the amenity-rich Stella residences designed by DesignArc; an attractive yet cost-effective student housing project for the University of Washington by Mahlum Architects; and the warm, modern University House Arena District also designed by Mahlum Architects in Eugene, Oregon.

Division Street Residence / Emerick Architects

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Mt. Hood Community College Early Childhood Center / Mahlum

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  • Architects: Mahlum
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  22751 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2011

The 8 Things Domestic Violence Shelters Can Teach Us About Secure School Design

Flexibility within communal spaces stimulates and encourages a variety of uses. Project Name: Truman High School, a Federal Way Public School. Photo by Benjamin Benschneider.
Flexibility within communal spaces stimulates and encourages a variety of uses. Project Name: Truman High School, a Federal Way Public School. Photo by Benjamin Benschneider.

In our last Editorial, "Post-Traumatic Design: How to Design Schools that Heal Past Wounds and Prevent Future Violence," we discussed how architects must conceptualize school design in the wake of the tragic shootings that have affected our nation. Rather than leaning towards overly secure, prison-like structures, the Editorial suggested a different model, one better suited to dealing with student needs (particularly for those who have experienced trauma): domestic violence shelters.

While the comparison may seem bizarre at first, shelter design is all about implementing un-invasive security measures that could easily make schools safer, healthier spaces for students. To further elaborate this unlikely connection, we spoke with an Associate at Mahlum Architecture, Corrie Rosen, who for the last 6 years has worked with the The Washington State Coalition Against Domestic Violence [WSCADV] on the Building Dignity project, which provides Domestic Violence Shelters advice to design shelters that empower and heal.

Find out Corrie Rosen's 8 strategies for designing schools that can improve security and student well-being, after the break...