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Leonard Fäustle

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Children's Scale: A Brief History of Kid's Furniture

Montessori Kindergarten in Xiamen / L&M DesignPhoto: 1931, Kaunas, Lithuania. Two children working on reading/writing words at Maria Varnienė's Children's House. The child on the left is Stasys Ragaišis, who later became a medical doctor.. Image via @montistory101Mi Casita Preschool and Cultural Center / BAAO + 4Mativ Design Studio. Image © Lesley UnruhPeter Keler - Puppenwagen, 19xx. Image via Wikimedia+ 53

Children's furniture is all furniture –fixed or mobile– that is designed according to the ergonomic guidelines and anatomical dimensions of children specifically. Following this definition, we can identify two types of furniture: (1) those that facilitate a relationship between the caregiver and the child, and (2) those that allow the child to use them independently.

The big difference between these two types is that the first has dimensions that mainly adapt to the ergonomics of the adult, while the second is designed to meet the ergonomic needs of the child at each stage of their development. Since the growth of children occurs relatively quickly, it is common for the furniture of this second group to be multifunctional or even extendable.

Multi Traffic Point Hoorn / WRK Architecten

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Neuroarchitecture Applied in Children's Design

Jardim de Infância SP / HIBINOSEKKEI + Youji no Shiro. Image © Studio Bauhaus, Ryuji InoueEscola Nía / Sulkin Askenazi. Image © Aldo C. GraciaPlayville Day Care / NITAPROW. Image © Ketsiree WongwanBiblioteca da Escola Umbrella / Savana Lazaretti Arquitetura e Design Sensorial. Image © Renata Salles+ 21

It is unquestionable that environments directly influence the behavior and emotions of their users. Human beings spend approximately 90% of their lives indoors, making it imperative that the spaces we inhabit stimulate positive behavior and emotions, or at least don't influence us negatively. There exists a specific term describing the stimuli that the brain receives from its environment: neuroarchitecture. Several studies have been published on this topic, most focusing on its impact on work environments. This article approaches this concept through a different, yet essential lens: emphasizing its importance in the design of spaces for children in early childhood.

Montessori school De Scholekster / Heren 5 Architects

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Loft Buiksloterham / Heren 5 Architects

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Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Student Housing in Elsevier Office Building / Knevel Architecten

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