Brandon Shigeta

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California House / Gluck+

California House / Gluck+California House / Gluck+California House / Gluck+California House / Gluck++ 30

  • Architects: GLUCK+
  • Area Area of this architecture project Area :  7500 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year :  2019
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers :  Miele, Corian, Echo Wood, Fenix, Flare, +3

Centered Home / aanda + HYCArch

© Brandon Shigeta
© Brandon Shigeta

Centered Home / aanda + HYCArchCentered Home / aanda + HYCArchCentered Home / aanda + HYCArchCentered Home / aanda + HYCArch+ 43

Los Angeles, United States

Accessory Dwelling Unit Re-Think / Yeh-Yeh-Yeh Architects

Accessory Dwelling Unit Re-Think / Yeh-Yeh-Yeh ArchitectsAccessory Dwelling Unit Re-Think / Yeh-Yeh-Yeh ArchitectsAccessory Dwelling Unit Re-Think / Yeh-Yeh-Yeh ArchitectsAccessory Dwelling Unit Re-Think / Yeh-Yeh-Yeh Architects+ 20

Los Angeles, United States

Positively Negative House / Dan Brunn Architecture

© Brandon Shigeta
© Brandon Shigeta

Positively Negative House / Dan Brunn ArchitecturePositively Negative House / Dan Brunn ArchitecturePositively Negative House / Dan Brunn ArchitecturePositively Negative House / Dan Brunn Architecture+ 45

Los Angeles, United States

West Coast Modernism: LA's New Class of Single Family Homes

Los Angeles is a city of dreams. Known across the United States and the world, L.A. embodies both freedom and experimentation, defined as much by its freeways as its diversity. It is also a city of houses. Single family homes cover almost half of Los Angeles, and as the city continues to evolve, architects have explored new ideas on modernity and daily life through the single family typology.

West Coast Modernism: LA's New Class of Single Family HomesWest Coast Modernism: LA's New Class of Single Family HomesWest Coast Modernism: LA's New Class of Single Family HomesWest Coast Modernism: LA's New Class of Single Family Homes+ 14

How to Virtually Enlarge Spaces Using Good Lighting

How to Virtually Enlarge Spaces Using Good LightingHow to Virtually Enlarge Spaces Using Good LightingHow to Virtually Enlarge Spaces Using Good LightingHow to Virtually Enlarge Spaces Using Good Lighting+ 41

One of the most essential aspects of interior design is lighting – an element that can make or break an interior space of any size or material. Yet good lighting can be especially important for smaller or more crowded spaces, making them feel larger and more open even when their literal dimensions haven’t changed. In turn, larger spaces with poor lighting may feel smaller and less welcoming than they have the potential to be. To make interiors feel aptly large and well lit, designers can rely on several tried and true methods that make the most of a space, from using the right shades and types of lights to placing them in the best locations to integrating other elements that best complement existing lighting. These strategies, as well as several examples of their application, are listed below.

In Praise of Tokyo: in Conversation With Junya Ishigami

In this short video by Louisiana Channel, Junya Ishigami talks about Tokyo and what he sees as the defining traits of the vibrant and diverse metropole. Discussing what he likes about the city, the renowned Japanese architect underlines Tokyo’s polycentrism and explains how being made up of different small town allows the city to preserve its very local characteristics.

Bridge House LA / Dan Brunn Architecture

© Brandon Shigeta
© Brandon Shigeta

Bridge House LA / Dan Brunn ArchitectureBridge House LA / Dan Brunn ArchitectureBridge House LA / Dan Brunn ArchitectureBridge House LA / Dan Brunn Architecture+ 39

Los Angeles, United States

#9 Dream / Dan Brunn Architecture

#9 Dream / Dan Brunn Architecture#9 Dream / Dan Brunn Architecture#9 Dream / Dan Brunn Architecture#9 Dream / Dan Brunn Architecture+ 52

Road to Awe / Dan Brunn Architecture

Road to Awe / Dan Brunn ArchitectureRoad to Awe / Dan Brunn ArchitectureRoad to Awe / Dan Brunn ArchitectureRoad to Awe / Dan Brunn Architecture+ 17

West Hollywood, United States

Hide Out / Dan Brunn Architecture

Hide Out / Dan Brunn ArchitectureHide Out / Dan Brunn ArchitectureHide Out / Dan Brunn ArchitectureHide Out / Dan Brunn Architecture+ 15

Zig-Zag House / Dan Brunn Architecture

Zig-Zag House / Dan Brunn ArchitectureZig-Zag House / Dan Brunn ArchitectureZig-Zag House / Dan Brunn ArchitectureZig-Zag House / Dan Brunn Architecture+ 24

Los Angeles, United States

When Biology Inspires Architecture: An Interview with Doris Kim Sung

Material Minds, presented by ArchDaily Materials, is our new series of short interviews with architects, designers, scientists, and others who use architectural materials in innovative ways. Enjoy!

Before attending Columbia University for her Masters in Architecture, Los Angeles-based architect Doris Kim Sung took a fairly non-traditional approach to becoming an architect: she was a biologist. Naturally then, Sung’s architectural work tends to take inspiration from the biological world, particularly in the way she experiments and innovates with materials. Much of her work involves thermal bimetals, a material that expands and contracts with temperature swings; it can even act as a sun shade and ventilation system, without the need for electricity.

So where does a biologist-turned-architect draw inspiration from? We interviewed Ms. Sung to find out for ourselves -- the responses, like her work at dO|Su Architecture, are simply fascinating.

Flip Flop House / Dan Brunn Architecture

Flip Flop House / Dan Brunn ArchitectureFlip Flop House / Dan Brunn ArchitectureFlip Flop House / Dan Brunn ArchitectureFlip Flop House / Dan Brunn Architecture+ 8

Los Angeles, United States

Hayvenhurst House / Dan Brunn Architecture

Hayvenhurst House / Dan Brunn ArchitectureHayvenhurst House / Dan Brunn ArchitectureHayvenhurst House / Dan Brunn ArchitectureHayvenhurst House / Dan Brunn Architecture+ 22

Los Angeles, United States