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Thomas Jefferson

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AD Classics: University of Virginia / Thomas Jefferson

04:00 - 8 December, 2016
AD Classics: University of Virginia / Thomas Jefferson, © Larry Harris
© Larry Harris

The end of the War of 1812 left the young United States of America awash with nationalist fervor. In the following years, the world’s first modern republic experienced unprecedented growth and prosperity; it was not without reason that the period came to be known as the “Era of Good Feelings.”[1] It was into this epoch of unbridled national pride that Thomas Jefferson, one of the country’s founding fathers and its third President, introduced his master plan for the University of Virginia: an architectural manifestation of the Enlightenment and republican ideals he had helped cultivate.

Ground floor plan and elevation of the Rotunda. ImageCourtesy of Wikimedia user Fæ Pavilion X was the only pavilion of the ten to feature Corinthian design elements. ImageCourtesy of US Library of Congress (Public Domain) Courtesy of US Library of Congress (Public Domain) Courtesy of US Library of Congress (Public Domain) + 37

15 Architects Who Have Been Immortalized on Money

09:30 - 12 May, 2016

In terms of memorialization, being selected to represent your country as the face of a banknote is one of the highest honors you can achieve. Even if electronic transfer seems to be the way of the future, cash remains the reliable standard for exchange of goods and services, so being pasted to the front of a bill guarantees people will see your face on a near-daily basis, ensuring your legacy carries on.

In some countries, the names of the faces even become slang terms for the bills themselves. While “counting Le Corbusiers” doesn’t quite roll off the tongue, a select few architects have still been lucky enough to have been featured on such banknotes in recent history. Read on to find out who the 15 architects immortalized in currency are and what they’re worth.

19 Notable Figures Who Left Architecture to Follow Other Career Paths

09:30 - 23 July, 2015
19 Notable Figures Who Left Architecture to Follow Other Career Paths, Courtesy of Unknown
Courtesy of Unknown

What do Ice Cube, the members of Pink Floyd, and Seal have in common with fashion icon Tom Ford and former president Thomas Jefferson? They all studied architecture. Perhaps a representation of the diversity of talents in architecture studios, household names like Samuel L. Jackson and Courteney Cox found their footing as students of architecture prior to reaching success in other fields. 

We've put together a list of some of the most unexpected names gracing the yearbooks of architecture schools from around the world, including the likes of Queen Noor of Jordan and George Takei of Star Trek fame. Discover "Weird Al" Yankovic's true (architectural) passions after the break.

Queen Noor of Jordan. Image via Flickr <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>Creative Commons</a> user Skoll World Forum Monticello by Thomas Jefferson. Image via Flickr <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>Creative Commons</a> user Eric Langhorst Ice Cube. Image via Flickr <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>Creative Commons</a> user Eva Rinaldi George Takei. Image via Flickr <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>Creative Commons</a> user TEDxKyoto + 18

ArchDaily takes on the National Mall by Bike

13:00 - 23 May, 2012
Washington National Monument and the United States Capitol Building © Karissa Rosenfield / ArchDaily
Washington National Monument and the United States Capitol Building © Karissa Rosenfield / ArchDaily

Partially cloudy with a high in the mid-seventies, this was weather we couldn’t say no to on the Sunday after the 2012 National Convention. Therefore we took advantage of the Washington D.C. Capital Bikeshare and set off on a self-guided tour of the National Mall. Although the National Mall was packed with graduates and tourists, we managed to weave in and out of pedestrian traffic quick enough to visit many of the historic buildings and memorials before heading off to Eero Saarinen’s beautiful Dulles International Airport. What a perfect way to wrap up an eventful week in the nation’s capital.

United States Capitol Building © Karissa Rosenfield / ArchDaily Vietnam Veterans Memorial © Karissa Rosenfield / ArchDaily Lincoln Memorial © Karissa Rosenfield / ArchDaily Thomas Jefferson Memorial © Karissa Rosenfield / ArchDaily + 33

PBS lists Top Ten Buildings that Changed America

15:00 - 12 May, 2012
Vanna Venturi House / Robert Venturi © Maria Buszek
Vanna Venturi House / Robert Venturi © Maria Buszek

PBS has released their selections of the top ten buildings that have changed the way Americans live, work and play. From Thomas Jefferson’s 224-year-old Virginia State Capitol to Robert Ventui’s postmodern masterpiece the Vanna Venturi House, each building on the list will be featured in a new TV and web production coming to PBS in 2013. Continue after the break to view the top ten influential buildings and let us know your thoughts!