All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions

RMA Architects

BROWSE ALL FROM THIS FIRM HERE

Chicago Architecture Biennial Announces 2019 Early Highlight Contributors

05:00 - 15 March, 2019
Chicago Architecture Biennial Announces 2019 Early Highlight Contributors, The new graphic identity of the 2019 Chicago Architecture Biennial. by LA-based ELLA. Image Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Biennial
The new graphic identity of the 2019 Chicago Architecture Biennial. by LA-based ELLA. Image Courtesy of Chicago Architecture Biennial

The third Chicago Architecture Biennial will occur from September 19, 2019, to January 5, 2020, and yesterday the first group of contributors to the 2019 edition and publication was announced. This year’s theme, “...and other such stories,” will bring together a multi-faceted and international exploration of architecture and the built environment. Newly commissioned projects for the Biennial will highlight issues including public housing, social justice, and the appropriation and preservation of the natural environment.

Lilavati Lalbhai Library / RMA Architects

03:00 - 21 February, 2019
© Tina Nandi
© Tina Nandi

© Tina Nandi © Tina Nandi © Rajesh Vora © Tina Nandi + 27

  • Architects

  • Location

    Ahmedabad, Gujarat, India
  • Category

  • Lead Architects

    Rahul Mehrotra, Payal Patel, Robert Stephens
  • Area

    31000.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Three Court House / RMA Architects

01:00 - 20 February, 2019
Three Court House / RMA Architects, © Tina Nandi
© Tina Nandi

© Rajesh Vora © Rajesh Vora © Rajesh Vora © Tina Nandi + 20

Soft Thresholds: Projects of RMA Architects, Mumbai

16:59 - 25 August, 2017
Soft Thresholds: Projects of RMA Architects, Mumbai, Entrance to the Visitors Center at the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (CSMVS), formerly known as the Prince of Wales Museum, Mumbai. Photo: Rajesh Vohra
Entrance to the Visitors Center at the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Vastu Sangrahalaya (CSMVS), formerly known as the Prince of Wales Museum, Mumbai. Photo: Rajesh Vohra

As a point of entry and exit, a threshold has a dual coding in society as both a physical and symbolic marker of separation and connection. Thresholds are often explicitly hard-edged or even brutal in their expression, demarcating rigid boundaries, as in the definitive lines of walls, barricades, and security checkpoints in buildings, around cities, or across larger territories. Too often, thresholds also divide human activity or communities according to social, ethnic, national, or economic characteristics. Architecture and planning can unwittingly contribute to these different forms of physical separation, especially in ways made visible through their practitioners’ interpretations of culture, religion, or legislation. As the academic disciplines that inform spatial practices, architecture and planning are themselves often similarly separated by disciplinary thresholds, inhibiting porosity between fields of research. By definition, an individual discipline necessarily is organized around a self-referential center of discursive production, but this often happens at the expense of the richness found at the intersection of multiple disciplinary perspectives. Is architecture, in its compulsive drive to create the autonomous object, inherently hardening the thresholds separating it from other disciplines and, by extension, reproducing those schisms within the built environment? Can architecture and planning intentionally construct soft thresholds―lines that are easily traversed, even temporarily erased―thereby allowing for multiple perspectives across different modes of research and practice and catalyzing disciplinary and social connections? What, then, is the physical expression of a soft threshold―a space that is visually and physically porous, plural in spirit, encompassing of its context, and yet rigorous in its expression?

The State of Architecture in India: An Interview with Rahul Mehrotra, Ranjit Hoskote, and Kaiwan Mehta

09:30 - 10 February, 2016
The State of Architecture in India: An Interview with Rahul Mehrotra, Ranjit Hoskote, and Kaiwan Mehta, Ranjit Hoskote, Rahul Mehrotra and Kaiwan Mehta during a working session. Image Courtesy of  Suresh KK (mid-day, a Jagran Group Publication)
Ranjit Hoskote, Rahul Mehrotra and Kaiwan Mehta during a working session. Image Courtesy of Suresh KK (mid-day, a Jagran Group Publication)

Today, the rapidly-developing country of India is one of the key places in the world where architecture could have the most impact; in spite of this, there has been little critical reflection on the country's architectural landscape, and architecture has struggled to assert its value to the wider population. Currently, the country's first major architectural exhibition in 30 years is taking place in Mumbai, curated by Rahul Mehrotra, Ranjit Hoskote, and Kaiwan Mehta and running until March 20th. In this interview, a shortened version of which was first published in Domus India's December Issue, Mustansir Dalvir sits down with the curators to discuss their exhibition and the past and present of Indian Architecture.

Looking back to the time architectural practices first began to proliferate in India, one sees that they always operated within an ecosystem of practice, academia, and association. We can trace this to the 1930s, when the Indian Institute of Architects (IIA) was set up, which in turn emerged from the alumni of the Bombay School of Art. Teachers at the school were the most prolific practitioners in the country, and students made the easy transition from learning to apprenticeship, to setting up their own practices. Even patrons, largely non-state (in the penultimate decades before independence) aligned themselves with the architects in a collegial association. The Journal of the Indian Institute of Architects and their annual lectures became the mouthpieces of collective praxis, as the many presidential speeches show. Everyone knew what everyone else was doing, knowledge flowed centripetally.

In the years after independence, these bonds became looser as the nation-state became the chief patron. While private wealth and industry provided steady work for architects all over the country, the IIA still continued to remain the platform of discourse and dissemination – an internal professional rumination, largely distanced from changing politics and culture in the country, especially from the seventies onwards. While students of architecture did briefly take political stances during the Emergency, practice remained unaffected.

Five Firms Selected for Final Stage of Sydney Art Gallery Expansion

00:00 - 19 January, 2015
Five Firms Selected for Final Stage of Sydney Art Gallery Expansion, Art Gallery of NSW. Image Courtesy of Flickr CC User Jason Starr
Art Gallery of NSW. Image Courtesy of Flickr CC User Jason Starr

Five practices have been selected to move on to the second stage of the Sydney Modern Project, a $450 million expansion of the Art Gallery of New South Wales (NSW). Of the twelve firms invited to participate in the competition, the five that will advance are: Kazuyo Sejima + Ryue Nishizawa / SANAA; Kengo Kuma & Associates; Kerry Hill Architects; RMA Architects (Rahul Mehrotra Architects); and Sean Godsell Architects.

AD Interviews: Rahul Mehrotra / RMA Architects

01:00 - 7 August, 2014

On his recent visit to Santiago, Chile we caught up with Rahul Mehrotra, founder of Mumbai-based RMA Architects and a professor of Urban Design and Planning at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design. Mehrotra is known for his advocacy work in Mumbai and has carried out projects on a myriad of scales including interior design, architecture, urban design, conservation and planning. His projects include everything from a house on a tea plantation to a campus for NGO Magic Bus, the KMC Corporate Office in Hyderabad and housing for mahouts and their elephants. Mehrotra has also written and lectured extensively on architecture, conservation and urban planning in Mumbai and India.

KMC Corporate Office / RMA Architects

01:00 - 10 June, 2013
KMC Corporate Office / RMA Architects, © Robert Stephens
© Robert Stephens

© Rahul Mehrotra Courtesy of RMA Architects Courtesy of RMA Architects © Robert Stephens + 16

Housing for Mahouts and their Elephants / RMA Architects

01:00 - 6 June, 2013
© Carlos Chen
© Carlos Chen

© Charles Garcia © Rajesh Vora © Rajesh Vora © Rajesh Vora + 17

Think Tank Retreat / RMA Architects

01:00 - 27 May, 2013
© Romil Sheth
© Romil Sheth
  • Architects

  • Location

    Valpoi, Goa, India
  • Category

  • Architect in Charge

    Rahul Mehrotra
  • Consultants

    Sewri Consultants (P)Ltd., Riyaz Rangawala, Sunil Services, Aseem Merchant
  • Area

    1685.25 sqm
  • Project Year

    2009
  • Photographs

© Rajesh Vora © Romil Sheth © Romil Sheth © Romil Sheth + 13

Magic Bus / RMA Architects

01:00 - 13 May, 2013
Magic Bus / RMA Architects, © Ariel Huber
© Ariel Huber

© Rahul Mehrotra © Rahul Mehrotra © Ariel Huber Courtesy of RMA Architects + 7

  • Architects

  • Location

    Panvel, Navi Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
  • Category

  • Architect in Charge

    Rahul Mehrotra
  • Consultants

    Vijay K. Patil & Associates, D.R.Bellare, Riyaz Rangwala, Sunil Services, Sewri
  • Area

    2415.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2007
  • Photographs

House in a Tea Garden / RMA Architects

01:00 - 2 May, 2013
House in a Tea Garden / RMA Architects, © Rahul Mehrotra
© Rahul Mehrotra

© Rajesh Vora © Rajesh Vora © Rahul Mehrotra © Rajesh Vora + 20

CSMVS - Visitor Centre at the Prince of Wales Museum / RMA Architects

01:00 - 18 April, 2013
CSMVS - Visitor Centre at the Prince of Wales Museum / RMA Architects, © Rajesh Vora
© Rajesh Vora

© Rajesh Vora © Rajesh Vora © Rajesh Vora © Rajesh Vora + 18