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Pedro Gadanho

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MAAT Opens with "Utopia/Dystopia – A Paradigm Shift" Exhibition

07:30 - 23 March, 2017
MAAT Opens with "Utopia/Dystopia – A Paradigm Shift" Exhibition, Utopia/Dystopia – A Paradigm Shift. Image Courtesy of MAAT
Utopia/Dystopia – A Paradigm Shift. Image Courtesy of MAAT

Following its official opening on October 5, 2016, the new MAAT building reopened to the public on March 22, 2017, with two major exhibitions that take up the whole building: Utopia/Dystopia – A Paradigm Shift, curated by Pedro Gadanho, João Laia and Susana Ventura – and Order and Progress by Mexican artist Héctor Zamora, curated by Inês Grosso.

Lisbon's Museum of Art, Architecture and Technology Set to Open in October

06:00 - 11 March, 2016
Lisbon's Museum of Art, Architecture and Technology Set to Open in October, © AL_A
© AL_A

The EDP Foundation has announced that MAAT, the Museum of Art, Architecture, and Technology in Lisbon, will open to the public on October 4-5. The museum, with a new kunsthall building designed by AL_A, will “become the centerpiece of one of the Portuguese capital’s most popular cultural areas, the historic riverside district of Belém."

Pedro Gadanho, who previously held a role as a curator in the Department of Architecture and Design at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York, has been appointed the first Director of MAAT.

MoMA Mines Its Unparalleled Holdings for Its "Endless House" Exhibition

09:30 - 15 September, 2015
MoMA Mines Its Unparalleled Holdings for Its "Endless House" Exhibition, Elevation and plan of Raimund Abraham's The House without Rooms (1974). Image © 2015 Raimund Abraham
Elevation and plan of Raimund Abraham's The House without Rooms (1974). Image © 2015 Raimund Abraham

There is perhaps no better display of modern architecture’s historical victory than Jacque Tati’s film Playtime. In it, a futuristic Paris has left-for-dead the grand boulevards of Haussmann, in favor of endless grids of International Style offices. The old city is reduced to longing reflections of Sacré-Cœur and the Eiffel Tower in the glass of these shiny new monoliths. But the irony central to the film is that this construction is created through mere surface treatments, and as the narrative unfolds, cheap mass-production withers in a world where the veneer has triumphed over craftsmanship and polish. In short, Modernism hasn’t always been all it's cracked up to be.

In the Museum of Modern Art’s new exhibition, "Endless House: Intersections of Art and Architecture," the simplicities of mass-market modern homes are abolished by artists and architects who, in examples from the 1940s to the present, have chosen to use the dwelling as a platform for universal messages and as an arena for architectural experimentation. In the same way that photography freed painting from the terrestrial concerns of realism, the simplicity of modernism liberated artists and architects to subvert extant conventions of buildings.

Model of Asymptote Architecture's Wing House, Helsinki (2011). Image © 2015 Asymptote Architecture Model of Frederick Kiesler's Endless House (1950–60). Image © The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Department of Architecture and Design Study Center. Photographer: George Barrows Haus-Rucker-Co's Stück Natur (Piece of Nature) (1973). Image © 2015 Haus-Rucker-Co Model of Emilio Ambasz's Casa de Retiro Espiritual, Córdoba, Spain (1976–79). Image © 2015 Emilio Ambasz + 20

Pedro Gadanho Leaves MoMA to Direct MAAT in Lisbon

12:16 - 6 July, 2015
Pedro Gadanho Leaves MoMA to Direct MAAT in Lisbon, Pedro Gadanho during an ArchDaily interview in 2013. Image © ArchDaily
Pedro Gadanho during an ArchDaily interview in 2013. Image © ArchDaily

After serving as curator for the past three years at the Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) in New York, Portuguese architect Pedro Gadanho will be leaving his position to become the first artist director of the new Museum of Art, Architecture and Technology (MAAT) in Lisbon. Scheduled to open in the fall of 2016, the new MAAT museum will be responsible for the EDP Foundation's cultural program. 

"Pedro Gadanho’s profile and international experience are essential to our ambitions for MAAT, making it a distinctive space of contemporary culture in Portugal", says António Mexia, CEO of EDP. Pedro Gadanho adds that "MAAT will be a cultural institution of the quality and breadth seen in major European cities, offering an exciting contemporary program at the intersection of art, architecture and technology."

MoMA's Pedro Gadanho on "Bringing Architectural Modernity Home"

00:00 - 26 November, 2014
MoMA's Pedro Gadanho on "Bringing Architectural Modernity Home", "The celebrity of architects such as Álvaro Siza and Eduardo Souto de Moura has certainly contributed to Portuguese architecture’s increasing presence in the local press." Image: Portuguese pavilion for Expo 98 – 1998 / Álvaro Siza. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
"The celebrity of architects such as Álvaro Siza and Eduardo Souto de Moura has certainly contributed to Portuguese architecture’s increasing presence in the local press." Image: Portuguese pavilion for Expo 98 – 1998 / Álvaro Siza. Image © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

This article by Pedro Gadanho was originally published in Homeland: News From Portugal, the project created for Portugal's national representation at the 2014 Venice Biennale.

Nobody doubts that, in large measures, 20th century modernity has been brought to one’s living room by the media. Sure, toasters and mass-produced carpets have offered a sense of domestic modernity fostered by ever-more accessible technologies. But newspapers, the radio, and TV sets have delivered the sense that one was immersed in the long revolution happening outside. Drawing from popular media, Martha Rosler’s “House Beautiful: Bringing the War Home” series (1967-1972) gave this idea a poignant visual expression. If newspapers carried home modernity’s many conflicts and tensions, life-style magazines completed the picture with alluring visions of how to make yourself and your environment become “modern.”

Álvaro Siza's Archives May Soon Belong to Canada

00:00 - 21 July, 2014
Álvaro Siza's Archives May Soon Belong to Canada, Imagem © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
Imagem © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

The archives of Álvaro Siza, whose drawings, sketches, and models have been exhibited in the most renowned cultural institutions around the world, may soon be transferred to the Canadian Centre for Architecture (Centre Canadien d'Architecture, CCA) in Montreal.

The architect confirmed on Wednesday to Portuguese paper PÚBLICO that he has been "in talks" with the CCA, as well as other un-named institutions from different countries, in order to "decide the future" of his archives. 

The EU Mies van der Rohe Architecture Award and The Future of European Architecture

01:00 - 19 June, 2014
The EU Mies van der Rohe Architecture Award and The Future of European Architecture, © Pepo Segura – Fundació Mies van der Rohe
© Pepo Segura – Fundació Mies van der Rohe

ArchDaily is pleased to announce our partnership with the European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture - Mies van der Rohe Award. The following is an essay from Constructing Europe by Pedro Gadanho, member of the 2013 Prize jury. 

When one wants to consider the future of any form of activity, one is tempted to extrapolate trends from current conditions. One translates signs from the present onto the shape of things to come. The conditions of a given moment, however, may be too circumstantial, and one should be particularly aware of their transient nature. This is the dilemma one obviously faces when considering ‘the future of European architecture’.

At the time the European Union Prize for Contemporary Architecture - Mies van der Rohe Award commemorates its 25th anniversary, the European project from which this Prize emanates – and to which it owes its symbolic meaning and promoting purpose – is itself at a crossroads.

In between austerity measures, the South and North divide, growing unemployment, a feeling of impoverishment and insecurity, and the apparent unsustainability of the Welfare State model, which had given the region prosperity after World War II, Europe itself seems to be facing a pivotal, if transient moment.

Venice Biennale 2014: Pedro Gadanho Explains Why Portugal's Pavilion Has No Buildings At All

00:00 - 5 June, 2014
Venice Biennale 2014: Pedro Gadanho Explains Why Portugal's Pavilion Has No Buildings At All, Pedro Gadanho em entrevista a ArchDaily em Abril de 2013
Pedro Gadanho em entrevista a ArchDaily em Abril de 2013

The following text by Pedro Gadanho was originally published in Portuguese in Portugal's Diário Expresso.

The most awaited event in the architecture world begins this week: the opening of the Venice Biennale. Thousands of participants, journalists, and invited guests will flood the fantastical Italian city to take the pulse of the discipline -the nations' representations, the novelties, the state of the art. For this, the 14th edition of the Biennale, the artistic direction of Rem Koolhaas has raised great expectations: the architect behind Casa da Música is, after all, the ultimate provocateur of an architectural stardom that's ever more predictable. 

Critics and Peers Comment on Shigeru Ban's Pritzker Prize

00:00 - 25 March, 2014
Critics and Peers Comment on Shigeru Ban's Pritzker Prize

Yesterday we asked some prominent critics and a few of Ban's peers to weigh in on the Japanese architect's Pritzker win. Curators, architects, and writers praised Ban's approach and conviction, describing what Ban's work signifies to the architecture community. Read on for comments from Architecture for Humanity co-founder Cameron Sinclair, MoMA curators Barry Bergdoll and Pedro Gadanho, Cooper Union classmates Nanako Umemoto and Jesse Reiser, of Reiser + Umemototo, and more.

"We are very proud of Shigeru as the first Pritzker Prize Winner to have graduated from Cooper Union. Shigeru continues to embody the independent thinking that was highly emphasized through our education. We met Shigeru in 1979, and can speak to his dedication to humanity from the beginning. As we recall, each design problem for Shigeru became an occasion to explore the work of what he considered to be the master architects as a way of developing his own voice. It has become fashionable to connect architecture to social causes; however, Shigeru has never seen it as a trend, but rather something fundamental to his design practice. Unlike those in the discipline who conflate their social and political commitments with architecture, he happens to be a very fine architect. As a result of his education abroad and his inclination to define a unique practice, Shigeru has always been viewed as an independent within the Japanese scene. We are very excited that Shigeru's work is being honored."
Nanako Umemoto and Jesse Reiser 
Founders of Reiser + Umemototo, RUR Architecture PC

GMG House / Pedro Gadanho

01:00 - 25 June, 2013
GMG House / Pedro Gadanho, © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG
© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG

© Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG © Fernando Guerra | FG+SG + 40

AD Interviews: Pedro Gadanho

01:00 - 30 April, 2013

Pedro Gadanho is a Portuguese architect, curator, teacher and writer, appointed as the  Curator for Contemporary Architecture at the MoMA in January last year.