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Kenzo Tange

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Kenzo Tange Gymnasium and 7 Other Threatened Sites Receive $1M in Preservation Funding

12:00 - 17 June, 2018
Kenzo Tange Gymnasium and 7 Other Threatened Sites Receive $1M in Preservation Funding, By <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/all-a/">Take</a> - <span> licensed under </span>, <a href="https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/">CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>, <a href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/all-a/14631188464/in/photolist-ojRF54-ohUEyb-o1AWYo-o1Cd1H-ohUEA5-ohUEu3-ohUEob-oi4gyy-o1AWW9-ojRERP-o1CcQn-ojREWi-o1BaKU-yYPDAf-o1BaYu-ohUEjo">Link</a>
By Take - licensed under , CC BY-NC-ND 2.0, Link

Eight sites from the World Monuments Fund’s 2018 World Monuments Watch list have been awarded $1 million in funding from American Express to support much-needed preservation and restoration initiatives. The sites were selected based on their vulnerability to specific threats like natural disasters, climate change or social forces like urbanization that have left them neglected.

Who Has Won the Pritzker Prize?

08:00 - 25 February, 2018
Who Has Won the Pritzker Prize?, Pritzker Prize 2017 Ceremony: Ryue Nishizawa, Tadao Ando, Kazuyo Sejima, Rafael Aranda, Glenn Murcutt, Carme Pigem, Ramon Vilalta, Toyo Ito, Shigeru Ban. Image © The Hyatt Foundation / Pritzker Architecture Prize
Pritzker Prize 2017 Ceremony: Ryue Nishizawa, Tadao Ando, Kazuyo Sejima, Rafael Aranda, Glenn Murcutt, Carme Pigem, Ramon Vilalta, Toyo Ito, Shigeru Ban. Image © The Hyatt Foundation / Pritzker Architecture Prize

The Pritzker Prize is the most important award in the field of architecture, awarded to a living architect whose built work "has produced consistent and significant contributions to humanity through the art of architecture." The Prize rewards individuals, not entire offices, as took place in 2000 (when the jury selected Rem Koolhaas instead of his firm OMA) or in 2016 (with Alejandro Aravena selected instead of Elemental); however, the prize can also be awarded to multiple individuals working together, as took place in 2001 (Herzog & de Meuron), 2010 (Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa of SANAA), and 2017 (Rafael Aranda, Carme Pigem, and Ramon Vilalta of RCR Arquitectes).

The award is an initiative funded by Jay Pritzker through the Hyatt Foundation, an organization associated with the hotel company of the same name that Jay founded with his brother Donald in 1957. The award was first given in 1979, when the American architect Philip Johnson, was awarded for his iconic works such as the Glass House in New Canaan, Connecticut.

The Pritzker Prize has been awarded for almost forty straight years without interruption, and there are now 18 countries with at least one winning architect. To date, half of the winners are European; while the Americas, Asia, and Oceania share the other twenty editions. So far, no African architect has been awarded, making it the only continent without a winner.

2018 World Monuments Watch Lists 50 Cultural Sites at Risk from Human and Natural Threats

14:30 - 23 October, 2017
2018 World Monuments Watch Lists 50 Cultural Sites at Risk from Human and Natural Threats, India, Post-Independence Architecture of Delhi. The Hall of Nations, a complex of exhibition halls built for the 1972 International Trade Fair, was demolished in April 2017. Ariel Huber, Lausanne/World Monuments Fund
India, Post-Independence Architecture of Delhi. The Hall of Nations, a complex of exhibition halls built for the 1972 International Trade Fair, was demolished in April 2017. Ariel Huber, Lausanne/World Monuments Fund

The World Monuments Fund has announced their 2018 World Monuments Watch, highlighting 25 cultural sites from across the globe currently at risk due to economic, political or natural threats. Covering more than 30 countries and territories, these monuments represent sites of exceptional cultural value dating from prehistory to the 20th century.

Iraq, Al-Hadba’ Minaret. The al-Hadba’ Minaret, seen from the mosque before its destruction, 2009. Mosab Mohammed Jaseem/World Monuments Fund Japan, Kagawa Prefectural Gymnasium. The Kagawa Prefectural Gymnasium, seen from the southwest, was designed to evoke the form of a traditional Japanese wooden barge, 2014. Noriyuki Kawanishi/World Monuments Fund Chile, Ramal Talca-Constitución. Four historic railbuses run on the Talca-Constitución narrow-gage line, 2006. Erick Cespedes/ Wikimedia Commons/ World Monuments Fund United States, Buffalo Central Terminal. The Buffalo Central Terminal complex includes an iconic Art Deco office tower, 2017. Joe Casico/World Monuments Fund + 29

Spotlight: Kenzō Tange

08:00 - 4 September, 2017
Spotlight: Kenzō Tange, St. Mary Cathedral. Image © <a href='https://www.flickr.com/photos/9160678@N06/1351951533'>Flickr user scarletgreen</a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/'>CC BY 2.0</a>
St. Mary Cathedral. Image © Flickr user scarletgreen licensed under CC BY 2.0

As one of the eldest in a long line of architects that have made Japan one of the most revered countries in architecture, Pritzker-Prize Winning architect Kenzō Tange (4 September 1913 – 22 March 2005) helped define Japan’s post-WWII emergence into Modernism. Though he was trained as an architect, Tange was equally as influential as an urban planner giving him significant influence in Japan and around the world at both large and small scales.

How to Pronounce the Names of 22 Notable Architects

09:30 - 17 April, 2017
How to Pronounce the Names of 22 Notable Architects

There’s no doubt that one of the best things about architecture is its universality. Wherever you come from, whatever you do, however you speak, architecture has somehow touched your life. However, when one unexpectedly has to pronounce a foreign architect’s name... things can get a little tricky. This is especially the case when mispronunciation could end up making you look less knowledgeable than you really are. (If you're really unlucky, it could end up making you look stupid in front of your children and the whole world.)

To help you out, we’ve compiled a list of 22 architects with names that are a little difficult to pronounce, and paired them with a recording in which their names are said impeccably. Listen and repeat as many times as it takes to get it right, and you’ll be prepared for any intellectual architectural conversation that comes your way. 

AD Classics: Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building / Kenzō Tange

04:00 - 27 September, 2016
AD Classics: Tokyo Metropolitan Government Building / Kenzō Tange, No.1 Building
No.1 Building

The career of Japanese architect Kenzō Tange features a curious anomaly: he received the same commission twice. In 1952, during the early stages of his career, Tange designed an administrative building in Yūrakuchō, Tokyo, for the city's metropolitan government. Over thirty years later, when the government relocated to Shinjuku, Tokyo, he again won the commission to design its administrative building. Completed in 1991, this would be one of his last, and most ambitious, projects. The second incarnation now dominates the city’s skyline, its highly distinctive design guaranteeing it landmark status. Nicknamed Tochō (an abbreviation of its Japanese name Tōkyō-to Chōsha), its architectural references to both tradition and modernity act as a visual metaphor for the eclectic city over which its inhabitants govern.

No.1 Building No.2 Building Elevation of No.1 Building (Public Domain) Plan of the Complex (Public Domain) + 12

"Baby Rems" and the Small World of Architecture Internships

09:30 - 9 July, 2015
"Baby Rems" and the Small World of Architecture Internships, Bjarke Ingels worked on the Seattle Central Library during his time at OMA. Image Courtesy OMA
Bjarke Ingels worked on the Seattle Central Library during his time at OMA. Image Courtesy OMA

The world of architecture is small. So small in fact, that Rem Koolhaas has been credited with the creation of over forty practices worldwide, led by the likes of Zaha Hadid and Bjarke Ingels. Dubbed “Baby Rems” by Metropolis Magazine, this Koolhaas effect is hardly an isolated pattern, with manifestations far beyond the walls of OMA. The phenomenon has dominated the world of architecture, assisted by the prevalence and increasing necessity of internships for burgeoning architects.

In a recent article for Curbed, Patrick Sisson dug into the storied history of internships to uncover some unexpected connections between the world's most prolific architects. With the help of Sisson's list, we've compiled a record of the humble beginnings of the household names of architecture. Where did Frank Gehry get his start? Find out after the break.

Renzo Piano's pavilion at Louis Kahn's Kimbell Art Museum. Image © Robert Laprelle Jeanne Gang worked on OMA's Maison Bordeaux. Image © Hans Werlemann, courtesy OMA Mies van der Rohe worked on Behren's AEG Turbine Factory. Used under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/'>Creative Commons</a>. Image © Flickr CC user Joseph The Guaranty Building in Buffalo, New York by Louis Sullivan. Image Courtesy of Jack E. Boucher + 8

"Classic Japan" Episode 1: Yoyogi National Gymnasium / Kenzo Tange

00:00 - 3 February, 2015

From Tokyo-based French architect and film maker Vincent Hecht comes "Classic Japan," a series of short films focussed on Japanese architecture from between the 1950s and 80s.

The first installment takes viewers into Kenzo Tange's 1964 Yoyogi National Gymnasium in Shibuya, built to house the swimming and diving events of the 1964 Summer Olympics. Completed in less than two years and seating upwards of 15,000 spectators, the Gymnasium is renowned for its suspension roof, and will host the handball competitions during Tokyo's 2020 Summer Olympics.

AD Classics: Shizuoka Press and Broadcasting Center / Kenzo Tange

01:00 - 4 September, 2013
AD Classics: Shizuoka Press and Broadcasting Center / Kenzo Tange, Courtesy of Petr Šmídek - www.archiweb.cz
Courtesy of Petr Šmídek - www.archiweb.cz

“Architects today tend to depreciate themselves, to regard themselves as no more than just ordinary citizens without the power to reform the future.”       - Kenzo Tange

In honor of what would have been Kenzo Tange’s 100th birthday, AD Classics presents one of the Japanese master’s most iconic projects - the Shizuoka Press and Broadcasting Center. Built in 1967, the building was the first spatial realization of Tange’s Metabolist ideas of organically-inspired structural growth, developed in the late 1950s. The Shizuoka Press and Broadcasting Center is far more significant than its relatively small size would suggest, encapsulating the concepts of  the new Metabolistic order in architecture and urban planning that prevailed in post-World War II Japan.

More about this icon of Metabolism after the break….

Video: Wang Shu, “Geometry and Narrative of Natural Form”

13:00 - 29 December, 2011

Founder of Amateur Architecture Studio and Head of Architecture at the China Academy of Art, Wang Shu was the first Chinese architect to hold Harvards Graduate School of Design (GSD) Kenzo Tange professorship. The Harvard lecture honors architect Kenzo Tange by bringing distinguished architects from around the globe to the GSD.

AD Classics: Hiroshima Peace Center and Memorial Park / Kenzo Tange

01:00 - 29 August, 2011

AD Classics: Hiroshima Peace Center and Memorial Park / Kenzo Tange AD Classics: Hiroshima Peace Center and Memorial Park / Kenzo Tange AD Classics: Hiroshima Peace Center and Memorial Park / Kenzo Tange AD Classics: Hiroshima Peace Center and Memorial Park / Kenzo Tange + 16

On August 6th, 1945, a B-29 bomber dropped the first atomic bomb in history over Hiroshima, Japan, targeting the intersection of bridges over the Honkawa and Motoyasu rivers. The bomb devastated Hiroshima within a radius of 5 km, resulting in 140,000-150,000 deaths by December of that year.  

AD Classics: St. Mary Cathedral / Kenzo Tange

00:00 - 23 February, 2011
AD Classics: St. Mary Cathedral / Kenzo Tange, © Scarletgreen
© Scarletgreen

© Scarletgreen © Mobileart © Scarletgreen © Scarletgreen + 20

  • Architects

  • Location

    3-6-15 Sekiguchi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo
  • Architect

    Kenzo Tange
  • Structure

    Tsuboi Research Center, University of Tokyo
  • Construction

    Taisei Construction Company
  • Client

    Archdiocesis of Tokyo
  • Area

    2541.0 m2
  • Project Year

    1964
  • Photographs

AD Classics: Yoyogi National Gymnasium / Kenzo Tange

00:00 - 15 February, 2011
AD Classics: Yoyogi National Gymnasium / Kenzo Tange, © Flickr User: kanegen
© Flickr User: kanegen

AD Classics: Yoyogi National Gymnasium / Kenzo Tange © Flickr User: Jamie Barras © Flickr User: Jamie Barras © wikiarquitectura + 13