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Fake Industries Architectural Agonism

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Material Focus: OE House by Fake Industries Architectural Agonism + Aixopluc

09:30 - 7 May, 2016
Material Focus: OE House by Fake Industries Architectural Agonism + Aixopluc, © José Hevia
© José Hevia

This article is part of our new "Material Focus" series, which asks architects to elaborate on the thought process behind their material choices and sheds light on the steps required to get buildings actually built.

In the Catalan countryside, on the outskirts of the small town of Alforja, sits an incongruous sight: among the scattered stone masia houses is a structure of steel and glass, a resolutely rectilinear box among the traditional housing forms. But once inside the OE House, designed by Fake Industries Architectural Agonism and Aixopluc, one realizes that the building is not so different to its neighbors after all: on the upper floor, the roof incorporates a system of ceramic vaults taken almost directly from traditional vernacular design. This feature then combines with plywood and OSB to create a truly eclectic material pallette. We spoke with the design's architects, David Tapias of Aixopluc and Cristina Goberna and Urtzi Grau of Fake Industries Architectural Agonism, to find out what lay behind these unusual material choices.

OE House / Fake Industries Architectural Agonism + Aixopluc

04:00 - 4 March, 2016
OE House  / Fake Industries Architectural Agonism +  Aixopluc, © José Hevia
© José Hevia

© José Hevia © José Hevia © José Hevia © José Hevia + 19

6 Final Designs Unveiled for Guggenheim Helsinki

05:00 - 23 April, 2015
6 Final Designs Unveiled for Guggenheim Helsinki , All 6 finalists. Image Courtesy of Guggenheim
All 6 finalists. Image Courtesy of Guggenheim

Now for the first time, Guggenheim has unveiled the six fully developed designs competing to become Guggenheim Helsinki. Selected from 1,715 entries in world's the most popular architectural competition, the remaining finalists have spent the past five months refining their designs after being shortlisted by an independent 11-member jury, of which includes Studio Gang's Jeanne Gang and former Columbia University dean Mark Wigley

The release foreshadows the April 25 opening of Guggenheim Helsinki Now: Six Finalist Designs Unveiled, a free exhibition that will open the projects up to public critique. A winner will be announced on June 23.  

All 6 detailed proposals, after the break.

Architecture vs. PR: The Media Motivations of the Guggenheim Helsinki

01:00 - 30 January, 2015
Architecture vs. PR: The Media Motivations of the Guggenheim Helsinki, One of the finalists in the Guggenheim Helsinki competition. Image Courtesy of Malcolm Reading Consultants
One of the finalists in the Guggenheim Helsinki competition. Image Courtesy of Malcolm Reading Consultants

More than ever, the media shapes architecture. The controversial Helsinki Guggenheim competition is as much about the use and exploitation of contemporary media as it is about design. The competition organisers are hugely proud to have over 1,700 entries to tweet about, but informed critics are less impressed. Has quantity ever guaranteed quality?

The competition has certainly created an impact. Some celebrate this, while others feel it has been detrimental to the profession, with so much unpaid time invested resulting in a low-level contribution to museum design.

Meanwhile, the spectre of Frank Gehry’s Bilbao Guggenheim, an “iconic” building that gave the American foundation so much positive publicity when it opened in 1997, haunts the Helsinki project. Finnish politicians hope for a similar success, a Sydney Opera postcard effect in this remote corner of the earth.

6 Finalists Revealed in Guggenheim Helsinki Competition

01:00 - 2 December, 2014
6 Finalists Revealed in Guggenheim Helsinki Competition, Courtesy of Malcolm Reading Consultants
Courtesy of Malcolm Reading Consultants

The Guggenheim has announced the finalists in the competition to design Guggenheim Helsinki, whittling down the entrants from a record-breaking 1,715 submissions to just six. Representing both emerging and established practices with offices in seven countries, the shortlisted entries show a variety of responses to the challenge of creating a world-class museum.

The six finalists are:

Read on after the break to see all six designs in detail, as well as the jury's comments on each.

Six Firms Named 2014's "New Practices New York"

01:00 - 4 February, 2014
Six Firms Named 2014's "New Practices New York", Haffenden House / PARA-Project
Haffenden House / PARA-Project

The American Institute of America’s New York Chapter (AIANY) has selected six young, and “pioneering” firms as the winners of the 2014 New Practices New York portfolio competition. The award is designed “to recognize and promote” emerging practices that are less than a decade old and based within the five boroughs of New York City. As a result, each winner will be featured in an exhibition at the Center for Architecture from October 1, through January 15, 2015. 

Without further ado, the 2014 New Practices New York winners are: