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Studio Gang Unveils Images of Rippled Condominium Tower in Brooklyn, New York

14:00 - 19 April, 2018
Courtesy of Binyan
Courtesy of Binyan

Studio Gang has released details of their proposed condominium tower in Downtown Brooklyn, New York City. “11 Hoyt” has been designed with an emphasis on nature and community-building, responding to a lack of comfortable outdoor space in Brooklyn through the creation of an “outdoor-indoor environment."

The Studio Gang scheme, designed in collaboration with Hill West Architects, reclaims a former parking garage site in a rapidly-densifying area, where the population has increased by 40% in twenty years. 11 Hoyt is set to transform the site into an elevated green podium anchored by a 770,000-square-foot (71,000-square-meter) residential tower featuring a “scalloped” façade.

Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners' 3 World Trade Center Nears Completion in New York

12:00 - 19 April, 2018
Courtesy of Silverstein Properties
Courtesy of Silverstein Properties

New images have been released of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners’ 3 World Trade Center in Manhattan, in advance of its June 2018 opening. The 1,080-foot-high (330-meter-high) building will be the fifth-tallest in New York City, and will feature the tallest private outdoor terrace in Lower Manhattan.

The scheme forms part of a larger development of the World Trade Center site, including SOM’s One World Trade Center, BIG’s 2 World Trade Center, and a Transportation Hub by Santiago Calatrava.

Courtesy of Silverstein Properties Courtesy of Silverstein Properties Courtesy of Silverstein Properties Courtesy of Silverstein Properties + 11

The Next Sustainability Crisis: Humans Are Using So Much Sand That We May Actually Run Out

09:30 - 16 April, 2018
Objects made of Finite, a material developed by students from Imperial College London using desert sand. Image Courtesy of Finite
Objects made of Finite, a material developed by students from Imperial College London using desert sand. Image Courtesy of Finite

Sand is the most-consumed natural resource in the world after water and air. Modern cities are built out of it. In the construction industry alone, it is estimated that 25 billion tons of sand and gravel are used every year. That may sound a lot, but it’s not a surprising figure when you consider how everything you’re surrounded with is probably made of the stuff.

But it’s running out.

This is a scary fact to think about once you realize that sand is required to make both concrete and asphalt, not to mention every single window on this planet. The United Nations Environment Programme found out that from 2011 to 2013, China alone used more cement than the United States had used in the entire 20th century and in 2012, the world used enough concrete to build a wall around the equator that would be 89 feet high and 89 feet thick (27 by 27 meters).

Zaha Hadid’s Only Private Residential Project Rises Above A Russian Forest

14:00 - 10 April, 2018
Zaha Hadid’s Only Private Residential Project Rises Above A Russian Forest, Courtesy of OKO Group
Courtesy of OKO Group

On a hillside forest outside of Moscow, amongst 65-foot-high (20-meter-high) pine and birch trees, sits the only private house to be designed and built by Zaha Hadid in her lifetime. With a form defined by its natural surroundings, the Capital Hill Residence is divided into two components, one merging with the sloping hillside, and another “floating” 72 feet (22 meters) above ground to unlock spectacular views across the Russian forested landscape.

Courtesy of OKO Group Courtesy of Zaha Hadid Architects Courtesy of OKO Group Courtesy of OKO Group + 6

Learn to Pre-Dimension a Reinforced Concrete Structure

04:00 - 9 April, 2018
Learn to Pre-Dimension a Reinforced Concrete Structure, Casa de fim de semana em São Paulo / spbr arquitetos. Image © Nelson Kon
Casa de fim de semana em São Paulo / spbr arquitetos. Image © Nelson Kon

It's fundamental that architects know about structures, not only to bring their designs to reality but also to be able to discuss their projects with engineers in order to find the best solutions for construction. Structural pre-dimensioning is crucial to the initial design of the structural components, revealing the restrictions and the possibilities of the spaces.

One of the main loads that a structure must support is its own weight, so it's essential to know this information so that the different parts of the building can be dimensioned. When starting a structural project, the engineer doesn't yet know the dimensions of the different pieces that make up the structure, and therefore, can't know their own weight. A paradox appears without a solution: to know the weight it's necessary to know the dimensions, but, to know the dimensions, it's necessary to know the weight.

During the development of the project the architect finds himself in the curious situation of having to design without necessarily knowing the size of each of the parts of the building (such as the size of the pillars, for example). These important elements directly affect functionality and aesthetics of the project.

Exhibition: Brutal Destruction

16:00 - 5 April, 2018
Exhibition: Brutal Destruction, Robin Hood Gardens, UK. Image © Oliver Wainwright
Robin Hood Gardens, UK. Image © Oliver Wainwright

Modernity certainly does not have to be characterized by ugliness, but we may well have to make some revisions in our standards of beauty.
— Edward J. Logue

pinkcomma gallery is proud to present Brutal Destruction, photographs of concrete architecture at the moment of its demise. The exhibit is curated by Chris Grimley of the architecture office over,under. The exhibit opens 12 April, 2018 from 6–9 p.m., and the will be on display through May 03, 2018.

Prentice Women's Hospital, Chicago, IL. Image © David Schalliol Mechanic Theatre, Baltimore, MD. Image © Matthew Carbone Third Church of Christ, Washington, DC. Image © Rey Lopez Shoreline Apartments, Buffalo, NY. Image © David Torke + 11

Historic Fortress Inspires Steven Holl's Competition-Winning Museum in France

12:00 - 16 March, 2018
The white concrete museum is inspired by an adjacent fortress. Image Courtesy of Steven Holl
The white concrete museum is inspired by an adjacent fortress. Image Courtesy of Steven Holl

Steven Holl Architects has won an international competition for the design of the Angers Collectors Museum and adjacent hotel in the historic city of Angers, France. Working in collaboration with developers Compagine de Phalsbourg, Holl’s scheme draws inspiration from the nearby 9th century Chateau d’Angers fortress, and seeks to form a new cultural gateway to the city.

The museum is connected to a titanium linear hotel. Image Courtesy of Steven Holl Conceptual watercolor sketch. Image Courtesy of Steven Holl A central atrium gives space for exhibitions. Image Courtesy of Steven Holl A series of reflecting pools reference the river that historically consumed the site. Image Courtesy of Steven Holl + 8

Construction Begins on MVRDV’s Redesign for Europe’s Biggest Urban Shopping Center

12:20 - 13 March, 2018
Construction Begins on MVRDV’s Redesign for Europe’s Biggest Urban Shopping Center, © Kréaction
© Kréaction

In the 3rd Arrondissement of the French city of Lyon, construction has begun on Lyon Part-Dieu, an MVRDV-designed scheme seeking to transform the city’s main shopping center. Featuring partly-transparent glass and a public green roof, the MVRDV scheme will revitalize and integrate what was formerly an introverted complex built for an era dominated by the car.

At 166,000 square meters, Lyon Part-Dieu is the largest downtown shopping center in Europe, built in 1975. In order to improve the existing outdated complex, MVRDV worked with co-architects SUD to produce a design that offers a contemporary update to the existing façade and a re-organization of the interior program. 

Concrete Blocks in Architecture: How to Build With This Modular and Low-Cost Material

09:00 - 12 March, 2018
Concrete Blocks in Architecture: How to Build With This Modular and Low-Cost Material, Mipibu House / Terra e Tuma Arquitetos Associados. Image © Nelson Kon
Mipibu House / Terra e Tuma Arquitetos Associados. Image © Nelson Kon

Concrete blocks are a prefabricated material mainly used to build walls. Like bricks, the blocks are stacked together and joined with a mortar, usually consisting of cement, sand, and water. The blocks are hollow inside to allow for steel bars and mortar filling. 

These blocks come in a variety of dimensions and textures, from traditional smooth surfaces to fluted or rough finishes, as well as special units for corners or for beams with longitudinal reinforcements. The dimensions of these blocks range from the classic 8x8x16 inches (approx 19x19x39 cm) which is meant for structural use, to a size of 8x3.5x39 inches (approx 19x9x39 cm) for partitioning walls. How can we incorporate them creatively into our designs?

Vila Matilde House / Terra e Tuma Arquitetos Associados. Image © Pedro Kok Casa + Estudio / Terra e Tuma Arquitetos Associados. Image © Pedro Kok Silent house / Takao Shiotsuka Atelier. Image © Takao Shiotsuka Atelier Casa entre Bloques / Natura Futura Arquitectura. Image © JAG Studio + 24

3D Printing Fuses Thai Craftsmanship to Create Habitable Concrete Structures

06:00 - 12 February, 2018
3D Printing Fuses Thai Craftsmanship to Create Habitable Concrete Structures, Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation
Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation

Siam Research and Innovation Company (SRI) is a Thailand-based cement manufacturer that has been developing innovations to push the limits of 3D printing in architecture. Their project 'Triple S' –developed in 2017– is based on traditional Thai craftsmanship to generate Surface, Structure, and Shelter in a single process; its specific artisanal form creating beautiful framework for structural purposes, easily building living spaces.

Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation + 22

Riverside Academy & Epigraphy Museum / Tanghua Architect & Associates

22:00 - 25 January, 2018
Courtyard. Image © Zhang Chao Studio
Courtyard. Image © Zhang Chao Studio

Minimised Structure to Avoid the Interuption with the Site. Image © Zhang Chao Studio Big Steps. Image © Zhang Chao Studio Entrance Courtyard . Image © Zhang Chao Studio Main Shear Wall Structure with Open Landscape View. Image © Zhang Chao Studio + 25

  • Architects

  • Location

    Shaoguan, Guangdong, China
  • Lead Architect

    Hua Tang
  • Design Team

    Tianhao Wang, Peng Shao, Jie Zeng, Yuli Zhao, Pengfei Li (Intern), Zinan Xiong (Intern), Nan Shi (Intern), Lijun Wu (Intern), Jie Wu (Intern)
  • Area

    2724.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Unpacking Paul Rudolph’s Overlooked Architectural Feats in Southeast Asia

09:30 - 20 December, 2017
Intiland Tower. Image © Darren Soh
Intiland Tower. Image © Darren Soh

To speak of Paul Rudolph’s illustrious career is to trace a grand arc stretching from the 1940s to the 1990s. More often than not, the popular narrative begins with his student days at Harvard under the tutelage of Walter Gropius, touches upon his earliest, much-loved Florida beach houses, circles around his eventual break from the rigidity of both the Sarasota School and the International Style, and finally races towards the apex: his chairmanship of the Yale School of Architecture, and the concurrent shift to a Brutalist architectural style characterized by monumental forms, rugged concrete, and interwoven, multilevelled spaces awash with a remarkable interplay of light. Then comes the fall from grace: the beloved Yale Art and Architecture Building went up in flames just as the architecture profession began to question modernist ideals, and eventually Postmodernism was ushered in. Flickering, sputtering, Rudolph's grand narrative arc lurched towards Southeast Asia, bearing away the “martyred saint.” Save for several scattered commissions in the United States, Rudolph spent the last two decades of his life building abroad, mostly across Hong Kong, Indonesia, and Singapore, until his death in 1997.

But of course, time and again, historians have sought to challenge the myth of the failed architect by rereading his understudied work from the late years. Adding to this growing corpus of fresh research and alternate perspectives is architectural photographer Darren Soh’s ongoing project documenting—so far—three of Rudolph’s major works in Southeast Asia: The Colonnade (1986) and The Concourse (1994) in Singapore, and the Intiland Tower (1997) in Surabaya, Indonesia.

The Concourse. Image © Darren Soh The Concourse. Image © Darren Soh The Colonnade. Image © Darren Soh Intiland Tower. Image © Darren Soh + 60

10 Innovative Ways to Use Concrete: The Best Photos of the Week

12:00 - 10 December, 2017
© Song Yousub
© Song Yousub

Of all construction materials, concrete is perhaps the one that allows the greatest diversity of finishes and textures. The mixture of its ingredients, the shape and texture of the formwork, and the pigmentation of the materials all offer the opportunity to achieve an interesting design. This week we've prepared a selection of 10 inspiring images of innovative concrete, taken by renowned photographers such as Gonzalo Viramonte, Song Yousub, and Ana Cecilia Garza Villarreal.

© David Schreyer Cortesía de Moon Hoon © Ana Cecilia Garza Villarreal © Giorgio Marafioti + 12

Shui Cultural Center / West-Line Studio

02:00 - 7 December, 2017
Shui Cultural Center / West-Line Studio, Courtesy of West-Line Studio
Courtesy of West-Line Studio

Courtesy of West-Line Studio Courtesy of West-Line Studio Courtesy of West-Line Studio Courtesy of West-Line Studio + 29

New Map Celebrates Tokyo's Concrete Architecture

16:00 - 4 November, 2017
New Map Celebrates Tokyo's Concrete Architecture, © Jimmy Cohrssen
© Jimmy Cohrssen

London-based publisher Blue Crow Media’s architectural guide series continues with Concrete Tokyo Map. A collaboration with design writer Naomi Pollock and photographer Jimmy Cohrssen, the map lays out 50 of Tokyo’s concrete wonders.

© Jimmy Cohrssen © Jimmy Cohrssen © Jimmy Cohrssen © Jimmy Cohrssen + 10

This Ultra-Thin Concrete Structure Was Constructed Using a Novel Steel-Net Formwork System

11:10 - 25 October, 2017
This Ultra-Thin Concrete Structure Was Constructed Using a Novel Steel-Net Formwork System, © Block Research Group, ETH Zürich / Michael Lyrenmann
© Block Research Group, ETH Zürich / Michael Lyrenmann

Materials researchers from the Block Research Group at the ETH Zurich, together with architects supermanoeuvre, have revealed a prototype for an ultra-thin, sinuous concrete roof system with an average thickness of just 5 centimeters. Using digital design and fabrication technologies, the team was able to calculate and construct a self-supporting shell structure using the minimal necessary material. This was facilitated through the use of a novel formwork system consisting of a net of steel cables and a polymer fabric stretched into a reusable scaffolding structure.

Arkitema Architects Designs 30 Shipping Container Apartments in Roskilde, Denmark

08:00 - 24 October, 2017
Arkitema Architects Designs 30 Shipping Container Apartments in Roskilde, Denmark, Courtesy of Arkitema Architets
Courtesy of Arkitema Architets

Beat Box: 30 apartments in 48 containers to transform the Danish neighborhood of Musicon, adjacent to the famous Roskilde Festival area. Designed by Arkitema Architects and constructed by Container Living, Beat Box is an integral part of Roskilde’s goal to revamp Musicon over the next 15 years by adding 1,000 jobs and 1,000 homes. 

Which Are The Most Used Materials in Social Housing?

06:00 - 16 October, 2017
Which Are The Most Used Materials in Social Housing?, © Ana Cecilia Garza Villarreal
© Ana Cecilia Garza Villarreal

Choice of building materials and the inherent continuous reflection about the reach and capabilities of architecture are an interesting alternative way to approach this issue. The materials used in social housing should address local and economic possibilities and the real needs for access to housing in the contemporary context.

In this article, we analyze different projects published on our site to identify some of the predominant materials used in social housing, both for the formation of structures or enclosures. The intentions of this are two-fold: firstly, to create a worldwide panorama of different case studies with different construction styles from a range of geographical locations, and secondly, to provide inspiration and tools to architects to make better social housing.

Below we present 15 social housing projects and their diverse materials and construction styles.