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3D Printing Fuses Thai Craftsmanship to Create Habitable Concrete Structures

06:00 - 12 February, 2018
3D Printing Fuses Thai Craftsmanship to Create Habitable Concrete Structures, Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation
Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation

Siam Research and Innovation Company (SRI) is a Thailand-based cement manufacturer that has been developing innovations to push the limits of 3D printing in architecture. Their project 'Triple S' –developed in 2017– is based on traditional Thai craftsmanship to generate Surface, Structure, and Shelter in a single process; its specific artisanal form creating beautiful framework for structural purposes, easily building living spaces.

Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation Courtesy of Lapyote Prasittisopin, Chanita Chuaysiri / Siam Research and Innovation + 22

Riverside Academy & Epigraphy Museum / Tanghua Architect & Associates

22:00 - 25 January, 2018
Courtyard. Image © Zhang Chao Studio
Courtyard. Image © Zhang Chao Studio

Minimised Structure to Avoid the Interuption with the Site. Image © Zhang Chao Studio Big Steps. Image © Zhang Chao Studio Entrance Courtyard . Image © Zhang Chao Studio Main Shear Wall Structure with Open Landscape View. Image © Zhang Chao Studio + 25

  • Architects

  • Location

    Shaoguan, Guangdong, China
  • Lead Architect

    Hua Tang
  • Design Team

    Tianhao Wang, Peng Shao, Jie Zeng, Yuli Zhao, Pengfei Li (Intern), Zinan Xiong (Intern), Nan Shi (Intern), Lijun Wu (Intern), Jie Wu (Intern)
  • Area

    2724.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

Unpacking Paul Rudolph’s Overlooked Architectural Feats in Southeast Asia

09:30 - 20 December, 2017
Intiland Tower. Image © Darren Soh
Intiland Tower. Image © Darren Soh

To speak of Paul Rudolph’s illustrious career is to trace a grand arc stretching from the 1940s to the 1990s. More often than not, the popular narrative begins with his student days at Harvard under the tutelage of Walter Gropius, touches upon his earliest, much-loved Florida beach houses, circles around his eventual break from the rigidity of both the Sarasota School and the International Style, and finally races towards the apex: his chairmanship of the Yale School of Architecture, and the concurrent shift to a Brutalist architectural style characterized by monumental forms, rugged concrete, and interwoven, multilevelled spaces awash with a remarkable interplay of light. Then comes the fall from grace: the beloved Yale Art and Architecture Building went up in flames just as the architecture profession began to question modernist ideals, and eventually Postmodernism was ushered in. Flickering, sputtering, Rudolph's grand narrative arc lurched towards Southeast Asia, bearing away the “martyred saint.” Save for several scattered commissions in the United States, Rudolph spent the last two decades of his life building abroad, mostly across Hong Kong, Indonesia, and Singapore, until his death in 1997.

But of course, time and again, historians have sought to challenge the myth of the failed architect by rereading his understudied work from the late years. Adding to this growing corpus of fresh research and alternate perspectives is architectural photographer Darren Soh’s ongoing project documenting—so far—three of Rudolph’s major works in Southeast Asia: The Colonnade (1986) and The Concourse (1994) in Singapore, and the Intiland Tower (1997) in Surabaya, Indonesia.

The Concourse. Image © Darren Soh The Concourse. Image © Darren Soh The Colonnade. Image © Darren Soh Intiland Tower. Image © Darren Soh + 60

10 Innovative Ways to Use Concrete: The Best Photos of the Week

12:00 - 10 December, 2017
© Song Yousub
© Song Yousub

Of all construction materials, concrete is perhaps the one that allows the greatest diversity of finishes and textures. The mixture of its ingredients, the shape and texture of the formwork, and the pigmentation of the materials all offer the opportunity to achieve an interesting design. This week we've prepared a selection of 10 inspiring images of innovative concrete, taken by renowned photographers such as Gonzalo Viramonte, Song Yousub, and Ana Cecilia Garza Villarreal.

© David Schreyer Cortesía de Moon Hoon © Ana Cecilia Garza Villarreal © Giorgio Marafioti + 12

Shui Cultural Center / West-Line Studio

02:00 - 7 December, 2017
Shui Cultural Center / West-Line Studio, Courtesy of West-Line Studio
Courtesy of West-Line Studio

Courtesy of West-Line Studio Courtesy of West-Line Studio Courtesy of West-Line Studio Courtesy of West-Line Studio + 29

New Map Celebrates Tokyo's Concrete Architecture

16:00 - 4 November, 2017
New Map Celebrates Tokyo's Concrete Architecture, © Jimmy Cohrssen
© Jimmy Cohrssen

London-based publisher Blue Crow Media’s architectural guide series continues with Concrete Tokyo Map. A collaboration with design writer Naomi Pollock and photographer Jimmy Cohrssen, the map lays out 50 of Tokyo’s concrete wonders.

© Jimmy Cohrssen © Jimmy Cohrssen © Jimmy Cohrssen © Jimmy Cohrssen + 10

This Ultra-Thin Concrete Structure Was Constructed Using a Novel Steel-Net Formwork System

11:10 - 25 October, 2017
This Ultra-Thin Concrete Structure Was Constructed Using a Novel Steel-Net Formwork System, © Block Research Group, ETH Zürich / Michael Lyrenmann
© Block Research Group, ETH Zürich / Michael Lyrenmann

Materials researchers from the Block Research Group at the ETH Zurich, together with architects supermanoeuvre, have revealed a prototype for an ultra-thin, sinuous concrete roof system with an average thickness of just 5 centimeters. Using digital design and fabrication technologies, the team was able to calculate and construct a self-supporting shell structure using the minimal necessary material. This was facilitated through the use of a novel formwork system consisting of a net of steel cables and a polymer fabric stretched into a reusable scaffolding structure.

Arkitema Architects Designs 30 Shipping Container Apartments in Roskilde, Denmark

08:00 - 24 October, 2017
Arkitema Architects Designs 30 Shipping Container Apartments in Roskilde, Denmark, Courtesy of Arkitema Architets
Courtesy of Arkitema Architets

Beat Box: 30 apartments in 48 containers to transform the Danish neighborhood of Musicon, adjacent to the famous Roskilde Festival area. Designed by Arkitema Architects and constructed by Container Living, Beat Box is an integral part of Roskilde’s goal to revamp Musicon over the next 15 years by adding 1,000 jobs and 1,000 homes. 

Which Are The Most Used Materials in Social Housing?

06:00 - 16 October, 2017
Which Are The Most Used Materials in Social Housing?, © Ana Cecilia Garza Villarreal
© Ana Cecilia Garza Villarreal

Choice of building materials and the inherent continuous reflection about the reach and capabilities of architecture are an interesting alternative way to approach this issue. The materials used in social housing should address local and economic possibilities and the real needs for access to housing in the contemporary context.

In this article, we analyze different projects published on our site to identify some of the predominant materials used in social housing, both for the formation of structures or enclosures. The intentions of this are two-fold: firstly, to create a worldwide panorama of different case studies with different construction styles from a range of geographical locations, and secondly, to provide inspiration and tools to architects to make better social housing.

Below we present 15 social housing projects and their diverse materials and construction styles.

UBC Researchers Develop New Concrete That Resists Earthquakes

14:00 - 10 October, 2017

Researchers from the university of British Columbia have developed a new fiber-reinforced concrete treatment that can “dramatically [enhance] the earthquake resistance of seismically vulnerable [structures].”

Called EDCC (eco-friendly ductile cementitious composite), the material is engineered at the molecular level to react similarly to steel – with high strength, ductility and malleability. When sprayed onto the surface of traditionally poured interior concrete walls, it reinforces against seismic intensities as high as the magnitude 9.0-9.1 earthquake that hit Tohoku, Japan in 2011.

New Map Celebrates New York City’s Brutalist Concrete Architecture

06:00 - 10 October, 2017
© Jason Woods for Blue Crow Media
© Jason Woods for Blue Crow Media

Finally, a brutalist map of New York City, thanks to London-based publisher, Blue Crow Media. The Concrete New York Map marks the tenth map in the architectural guide series, highlighting over fifty of The City’s finest concrete buildings.

Not often thought of as a brutalist capitol, the concrete jungle is filled with remarkable buildings by Breuer, Pei, Rudolph, Saarinen, Wright, alongside lesser-known works, mapped out, photographed, and paired with a description of the building. The map is edited by Allison Meier, and adorned with Jason Woods’ photography and is the perfect pocket guide for any architect or brutalism lover.

Courtesy of Blue Crow Media Courtesy of Blue Crow Media Courtesy of Blue Crow Media Courtesy of Blue Crow Media + 8

10 Iconic Brutalist Buildings in Latin America

08:00 - 8 October, 2017
10 Iconic Brutalist Buildings in Latin America, via Flickr User: Renovación República CC BY 2.0
via Flickr User: Renovación República CC BY 2.0

This article was originally published by KatariMag, a blog that explores the history of contemporary culture in its most sophisticated and fresh expression. Follow their Instagram and read more of their articles here

Brutalist architecture responds to a specific moment in history. As WWII was coming to an end, a new form of State was rising from the ashes, along with a global order that would include and increase the relevance of peripheral nations. Brutalist architecture was born as a response to the ideas of the robust nations that would lead the masses. Critic Michael Lewis said, "brutalism is the vernacular expression of the welfare state."

Espresso Yourself With This Brutalist Coffee Machine

16:00 - 1 October, 2017
Espresso Yourself With This Brutalist Coffee Machine, Courtesy of Montaag
Courtesy of Montaag

Architects and coffee go hand in hand. The aesthetic of the espresso maker has become a mundane part of the morning ritual. The designers at Montaag are changing that with the release of AnZa  a show-stopping espresso maker made of concrete. After four years of prototyping and testing, the espresso maker is equipped with high-tech functionality for important things, like remotely brewing your cup as an incentive to get out of bed. 

Courtesy of Montaag Courtesy of Montaag Courtesy of Montaag Courtesy of Montaag + 12

What Do The Cracks in Concrete Structures Mean?

08:00 - 27 September, 2017

Cracks, which could be classified according to their thickness as fissures or fractures, are serious problems in the construction industry that can negatively affect aesthetics, durability and, most importantly, the structural characteristics of a project. They can happen anywhere, but occur especially in walls, beams, columns, and slabs, and usually, are caused by strains not considered in the design.

Cultural Center of Beicheng Central Park in Hefei / Shenzhen Huahui Design

22:00 - 22 September, 2017
Cultural Center of Beicheng Central Park in Hefei / Shenzhen Huahui Design, Streetview. Image © Yao Li, Sui Sicong
Streetview. Image © Yao Li, Sui Sicong

“crescent path”. Image © Yao Li, Sui Sicong Wall-corridor. Image © Yao Li, Sui Sicong the entrance hall. Image © Yao Li, Sui Sicong the exhibition hall. Image © Yao Li, Sui Sicong + 30

  • Architects

  • Location

    Beicheng New District, Hefei, Anhui, China
  • Architect in Charge

    Xiao Cheng
  • Project architect

    Yin Shibo, He Qifan, Mao Weiwei
  • Owner

    Hefei Vanke Real Estate Co.,Ltd&& Suzhou New Real Estate Group Co., Ltd
  • Owner management team

    Chen Zhuo, Ren Muyuan, Tan Xiang, Zou Xiang
  • Area

    3400.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017
  • Photographs

AD Classics: Neviges Mariendom / Gottfried Böhm

08:00 - 1 September, 2017
AD Classics: Neviges Mariendom / Gottfried Böhm, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Standing like a concrete mountain amid a wood, the jagged concrete volume of the Neviges Mariendom [“Cathedral of Saint Mary of Neviges”] towers over its surroundings. Built on a popular pilgrimage site in western Germany, the Mariendom is only the latest iteration of a monastery that has drawn countless visitors and pilgrims from across the world for centuries. Unlike its medieval and Baroque predecessors, however, the unabashedly Modernist Mariendom reflects a significant shift in the outlook of its creators: a new way of thinking for both the people of post-war Germany and the wider Catholic Church.

© Yuri Palmin © Yuri Palmin © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu + 22

Wuyishan Bamboo Raft Factory / TAO - Trace Architecture Office

02:00 - 31 August, 2017
Wuyishan Bamboo Raft Factory / TAO - Trace Architecture Office, © Shengliang Su
© Shengliang Su

© Shengliang Su © Shengliang Su © Shengliang Su © Shengliang Su + 66

  • Architects

  • Location

    Xingcun Town, Wuyishan Mountain, Fujian, China
  • Lead Architect

    Li Hua
  • Design Team

    Elisabet Aguilar Palau, Jie Zhang, Laijing Zhu, Erxun Lai (site architect), Martino Aviles, Nan Jiang, Weiwen Shi, Junqin Lian
  • Area

    14629.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

How To Build a 1,000-Square-Meter Building in Just a Few Months

08:00 - 22 August, 2017

After the Gomos#1 prototype and the exhibition at the Venice Biennale, SUMMARY studio unveils a new project using its modular building system.