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11 New York Architectural Icons Misplaced by Anton Reponnen

08:00 - 17 September, 2018
11 New York Architectural Icons Misplaced by Anton Reponnen, © Anton Reponnen
© Anton Reponnen

Architecture is all about context, either as a way to find harmony with it's surroundings or as a reaction against them. But what happens when you take context out of the picture entirely?

Designer Anton Reponnen, in his Misplaced photo series, has taken 11 of New York's most iconic landmarks, ranging from the Empire State Building to Renzo Piano's Whitney, and transplanted them in deserts, tundras, and plains. With the buildings placed in a "wrong" condition, viewers are challenged to evaluate the architecture in a different way. In Reponnen's eyes (and in the stories that accompany the images), each structure is as alive as we are, and their new location is mystery with motives to uncover.

© Anton Reponnen © Anton Reponnen © Anton Reponnen © Anton Reponnen + 11

This New Documentary Series Seeks to Bring Knowledge to Architecture Students

06:00 - 15 September, 2018
This New Documentary Series Seeks to Bring Knowledge to Architecture Students

Architecture, Form, and Energy is a documentary series featuring 6 interviews with architects and intellectuals from the United Kingdom, United States, Malaysia, and Mexico. The series seeks to disseminate information that inspires contemporary architectural evolution, from the impact of climate on a place, finding inspiration in nature, the relationship between form and energy, selecting the right materials, and appropriate technological application.

New Open Course by Dominique Perrault to Explore the Potential of Underground Architecture

06:00 - 7 September, 2018
Courtesy of Dominique Perrault Architecture
Courtesy of Dominique Perrault Architecture

Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne and architect Dominique Perrault have jointly announced a new MOOC (Massive Open Online Course) exploring the subterranean architecture of cities. The course, entitled “Groundscape Architecture Design Lab, rethinking cities underground” is available on open course hub edx and is free to registered users. Classes will begin on the 15 October.

The Best Structures of Burning Man 2018

14:00 - 3 September, 2018
The Best Structures of Burning Man 2018, Courtesy of Bjarke Ingels
Courtesy of Bjarke Ingels

As Burning Man 2018 comes to a close, snapshots and glimpses of the event have begun to emerge in the mediasphere. The most recognizable among these is, perhaps, BIG's Orb, a hovering sphere representing a scaled version of the earth itself.

Exploring Architecture Through Vertical Dance

06:00 - 1 September, 2018
Exploring Architecture Through Vertical Dance, via BANDALOOP
via BANDALOOP

What do dance and architecture have in common? It's difficult to explain how our experiences of dance are stored in our bodily memory, but central to our recollection of a performance is the architectural space that it inhabited. Although dance may have been the central focus, the site is integral to its experience. Both disciplines are fundamental when exploring the ways we navigate and create cities and urban spaces. 

It's no surprise that many choreographers explore both disciplines: dance and architecture. These pieces question how our bodies navigate through built environments. However, it is important to note that this experimentation is not merely contemplative but speaks to the way specific groups of peoples and cultures operate in their surroundings. In the words of the philosopher Marina Garcés: "The body is no longer what is and binds us to a place, but it is the condition for every place. It is the zero point of all the spatialities that we can experience, and at the same time, all the links that constitute us, materially and psychically."

This Week in Architecture: Labors of Love, from the Hedonistic to the Homegrown

09:30 - 31 August, 2018
This Week in Architecture: Labors of Love, from the Hedonistic to the Homegrown, Courtesy of BIG Ideas
Courtesy of BIG Ideas

Working life as an architect is notoriously difficult. Unreasonable demands from clients, be they about budget, deadlines, or design (not to mention uncompromising personal standards) make the job tough, particularly as architecture continues to be seen as a product. And while it's no reason to accept low (or unequal) pay, troubling mental health, or any of the myriad issues architecture seems beset with, architects anywhere will tell you: you do it because you love it.

High Speed Rail in the US: Myth or Near-Future Possibility?

09:30 - 30 August, 2018
High Speed Rail in the US: Myth or Near-Future Possibility?, Courtesy of Flickr user Andrew Stawarz. ImageKing's Cross Station Concourse / John McAslan + Partners
Courtesy of Flickr user Andrew Stawarz. ImageKing's Cross Station Concourse / John McAslan + Partners

In Europe, Asia and much of the developed world, high speed rail is convenient and accessible. Whether for business or pleasure, travelers are served by an efficient and extensive rail network that connects passengers to the desired destination on time and with relatively little effort. Although these train systems can travel as fast as 350 kilometers per hour, speed is not the only important factor. Rail stations in Europe, for example, are an integral part of the historic urban fabric. These facilities are often perceived as civic destinations that play a fundamental role in the mobility system, providing a wide range of services for the larger collective; shopping, entertainment, commercial and civic uses are often paired with transit services as new stations are built and historic stations are retrofitted.

Designing Dead Space: How Architecture Plays a Role in the Afterlife

09:30 - 27 August, 2018
Courtesy of VERO Visual. ImageHofmanDujardin
Courtesy of VERO Visual. ImageHofmanDujardin

While cemeteries have long served as a place in which we can honor and remember our loved ones, they are also often places that showcase architecture, and landscape design. In the late 19th century, cemeteries evolved from overcrowded and unsanitary urban spaces into rural, park-like social centers. In cities that lacked public parks, cemeteries became popular destinations for picnics, holidays, and other family gatherings.

Good Taste and the Transformation of McDonald's

09:30 - 21 August, 2018
Courtesy of McDonald's, via Metropolis Magazine
Courtesy of McDonald's, via Metropolis Magazine

This article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine as "Will the Culture of Good Taste Devour McDonald's?"

At a new corporate headquarters in Chicago’s West Loop neighborhood, there’s a double-height lobby filled with green walls and massive art installations. Travel to its top floor roof deck and you’ll find a cozy fire pit next to a fitness center and bar (happy hours are on Thursday). Elsewhere, stair-seating terraces face floor-to-ceiling windows with views of the Chicago skyline. This vertical campus settles in peaceably among its tony Randolph Street neighbors—Michelin stars, tech giants, and boutique hotels. At first glance, it’s refined and tasteful enough to be any one of these.

The Memorials of Yugoslavia, Through the Lens of Jonathan Jimenez

14:00 - 18 August, 2018
The Memorials of Yugoslavia, Through the Lens of Jonathan Jimenez, © Jonathan "Jonk" Jimenez
© Jonathan "Jonk" Jimenez

Thirty years after the breakup of the former Yugoslavia, the traces of the regime seem increasingly few and far between. Among the still existing monuments, conditions are mixed: some remain pristine, others are worn away after years of exposure to the elements.

© Jonathan "Jonk" Jimenez © Jonathan "Jonk" Jimenez © Jonathan "Jonk" Jimenez © Jonathan "Jonk" Jimenez + 27

This Week in Architecture: Australia's Tallest Tower and Questions about Infrastructure

09:30 - 18 August, 2018
This Week in Architecture: Australia's Tallest Tower and Questions about Infrastructure, Green Spine / UNStudio + Cox Architecture . Image Courtesy of UNStudio / Cox Architecture
Green Spine / UNStudio + Cox Architecture . Image Courtesy of UNStudio / Cox Architecture

Australia loomed large in the news this week following the announcement for the continent's tallest tower in Melbourne. The competition, which was won by a joint bid from UNStudio and Cox Architecture, boasted designs from some of the world's best-known firms including MVRDV, OMA, MAD, and BIG.

Architecture and Homelessness: What Approaches Have We Seen?

09:30 - 15 August, 2018
Architecture and Homelessness: What Approaches Have We Seen?, Image Courtesy of Framlab
Image Courtesy of Framlab

In the last global survey undertaken by the United Nations in 2005, there were an estimated 100 million people who were homeless around the world and 1.6 billion who lived without adequate housing. This number has escalated in recent years; unaffordable housing has become a global norm, making it increasingly difficult for the disadvantaged to seek out permanent, or even temporary shelter.

As housing becomes a means of accumulating wealth rather than fulfilling its fundamental goal of shelter, well-intentioned architects have attempted to solve the homelessness crisis through creative ideas and innovative design. But is architecture really the solution?

Revealing the Mystery Behind the Architect: What Was James Stirling Really Like?

09:30 - 14 August, 2018
© Evan Chakroff
© Evan Chakroff

James Stirling (1926-1992) was a British architect who is considered by many as the premier architect of his generation and an innovator in postwar architecture. Some of his most famous projects include the Sackler Museum, No 1 Poultry, and the Neue Staatsgalerie. Through the influence of his teacher Colin Rowe, Stirling had a deep understanding of architectural history, yet never adopted a singular doctrine. His career began with designs that were more aligned with what would later be labeled as the deconstructivist style, but evolved into buildings that were a series of dynamic and often colorful arrangements. Stirling’s aesthetic tropes ultimately gave the final push that broke architecture free from the clutch of post-war European Modernism as he turned the Modernist canon of “form follows function” into a hyperbole by celebrating the expression of a building’s program with his over-the-top details. Stirling’s work is still largely influential, and the recursive wave of history has shown that the underlying implications of his oeuvre remains somewhere in all architectural practice of the present day.

Reinventing a Superblock in Central Seoul - Without the Gentrification

09:30 - 13 August, 2018
Reinventing a Superblock in Central Seoul - Without the Gentrification, Courtesy Kyoung Roh, via Metropolis Magazine
Courtesy Kyoung Roh, via Metropolis Magazine

This article was originally published by Metropolis Magazine as "A Once-Maligned Concrete Megastructure in Seoul is Revitalized - Sans Gentrification".

Upon its completion in 1966, Sewoon Sangga, designed by prominent South Korean architect Kim Swoo-geun, was a groundbreaking residential and commercial megastructure consisting of eight multistory buildings covering a full kilometer in the heart of Seoul. Like other futuristic projects of the decade, it was conceived as a self-contained city, complete with amenities that included a park, an atrium, and a pedestrian deck. But construction realities crippled Kim’s utopian vision, compromising those features. By the late 1970s, Sewoon Sangga had shed residents and anchor retail outlets to newer, shinier developments in the wealthy Gangnam district across the river. Between Sewoon’s central location and plunging rents, the building became a hub for light industry—as well as illicit activity.

ZHA's Galaxy SOHO, Through the Lens of Andres Gallardo

14:00 - 12 August, 2018
Galaxy SOHO / ZHA. Image © Andres Gallardo
Galaxy SOHO / ZHA. Image © Andres Gallardo

Photographer Andres Gallardo, who has captured images of noted architectural works such as Zaha Hadid’s Dongdaemun Design Plaza and MAD Architects’ Harbin Opera House, has turned his lens on ZHA's Galaxy Soho, located in Beijing. The shopping complex, which was completed in 2012 is one of famed architect Zaha Hadid's late career works.

Galaxy SOHO / ZHA. Image © Andres Gallardo Galaxy SOHO / ZHA. Image © Andres Gallardo Galaxy SOHO / ZHA. Image © Andres Gallardo Galaxy SOHO / ZHA. Image © Andres Gallardo + 18

Why Architects are Super Well-Suited for Startups

09:30 - 9 August, 2018
Why Architects are Super Well-Suited for Startups, Forrest Jessee’s Sleep Suit. Image © Forrest Jessee
Forrest Jessee’s Sleep Suit. Image © Forrest Jessee

This article was originally published by Jude Fulton on Medium under the title "Why Architects are Super Well-Suited for Startups". You can see the original post here.

Mind the Gap: Minimizing Data Loss Between GIS and BIM

09:30 - 6 August, 2018
Mind the Gap: Minimizing Data Loss Between GIS and BIM, via Wikimedia. ImageDom Luis Bridge / Porto, Portugal
via Wikimedia. ImageDom Luis Bridge / Porto, Portugal

An unfortunate fact of the AEC (architecture, engineering, and construction) industry is that, between every stage of the process—from planning and design to construction and operations—critical data is lost.

The reality is, when you move data between phases of, say, the usable lifecycle of a bridge, you end up shuttling that data back and forth between software systems that recognize only their own data sets. The minute you translate that data, you reduce its richness and value. When a project stakeholder needs data from an earlier phase of the process, planners, designers, and engineers often have to manually re-create that information, resulting in unnecessary rework. 

Will Architecture in the Future Be a Luxury Service?

09:30 - 2 August, 2018
Will Architecture in the Future Be a Luxury Service?, Oculus / Santiago Calatrava. Image © Photo by gdtography from Pexels
Oculus / Santiago Calatrava. Image © Photo by gdtography from Pexels

This article was originally published by Common Edge as "In the Era of Artificial Intelligence, Will Architecture Become Artisanal?"

Like food and clothing, buildings are essential. Every building, even the most rudimentary, needs a design to be constructed. Architecture is as central to building as farming is to food, and in this era of rapidly advancing technological change farming may offer us valuable lessons.

At last census count there were 233,000 architects in the United States; the 113,000 who are currently licensed represent a 3% increase from last year. In addition there’s a record number of designers who qualify for licensure: more than 5,000 this year, almost the same number as graduates with professional degrees. There is now 1-architect-for-every-2,900 people in the US. A bumper crop, right?