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Bataan Chapel by Swiss Artist Not Vital Questions the Boundaries Between Art and Architecture

07:45 - 8 April, 2018
Bataan Chapel by Swiss Artist Not Vital Questions the Boundaries Between Art and Architecture, Interior of the Chapel, lit by the opening above "The Last Supper." Image © Eric Gregory Powell
Interior of the Chapel, lit by the opening above "The Last Supper." Image © Eric Gregory Powell

Art, in general, is produced to be seen or experienced by another, an interlocutor, who, in turn, establishes various relationships with the work. However, this does not appear to be the case with the Bataan Chapel, built by the Swiss artist Not Vital in the Philippines.

Punished by constant winds, the work rises on a hill in rural Bagac, a town of just under 30,000 inhabitants located about 50 kilometers west of Manilla. The remote location of the installation makes it difficult to access and makes the journey a task that takes on the air of pilgrimage—part of its grace lies precisely in its inaccessibility.

Architecture's "Dark Products": What Do Architects Claim Ownership of in the Design Process?

09:30 - 4 April, 2018
Architecture's "Dark Products": What Do Architects Claim Ownership of in the Design Process?, Courtesy of Curtis Roth
Courtesy of Curtis Roth

Why do we build? How do we build? Who do we ultimately build for? These have been questions that have dominated the worlds of both practice and pedagogy since the early ages of architecture. On a basic level, those questions can be answered almost reflexively, with a formulaic response. But is it time to look beyond just the simple why, how, and who?

In a world where the physical processes of architecture are becoming increasingly less important and digital processes proliferate through all phases of architectural ideas and documentation, we should perhaps be looking to understand the ways in which architects work, and examine how we can claim the processes—not just the products—of our labors.

The Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos Project That Will Be The New Urban Icon of Monterrey

08:00 - 31 March, 2018
The Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos Project That Will Be The New Urban Icon of Monterrey, Cortesía de Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos
Cortesía de Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos

Cortesía de Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos Cortesía de Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos Cortesía de Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos Cortesía de Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos Cortesía de Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos Cortesía de Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos + 20

Proyectos 9, a Monterrey real estate developer, announced Sordo Madaleno Arquitectos as the winners of the international architectural design competition for the construction of Constitución 999, a new mixed-use complex to be erected in the downtown area of Monterrey.

Sharing Your Home with Strangers: What Does the Future Hold for the Co-Living Craze?

09:30 - 27 March, 2018
Sharing Your Home with Strangers: What Does the Future Hold for the Co-Living Craze?  , © Danist Sey Peng
© Danist Sey Peng

What if your apartment was more than just a place to live? What if it was a catalyst for social interactions? Or what if it removed the everyday tedious tasks of cleaning, paying bills, and buying furnishings? Co-living, a modern form of housing where residents share living spaces, is aiming to do just that.

Co-living is growing in popularity in major cities such as London and New York, where increasing housing prices are forcing residents to look at new and adaptive ways to rent in the city. When we discussed the ambitions and inspirations behind the co-living movement in 2016, it was still a concept that was in its relatively experimental stages. Today, co-living is more focused in its mission, and has found success by pushing people together through a collection of common themes: a yearning for social connection, participation in an increasingly shared economy, and the affordability of a convenient housing solution.

City of Los Angeles Appoints Inaugural Chief Design Officer

16:00 - 24 March, 2018
© <a href=‘https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Att_building_LA.jpg'>Wikimedia user KennethHan</a>  licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/'>CC BY-NC-ND 2.0</a>
© Wikimedia user KennethHan licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

Recently, long-standing architecture critic for the LA Times Christopher Hawthorne announced that he was stepping down to take up the position of chief design officer for the City of Los Angeles in Mayor Eric Garcetti’s administration. According to Hawthorne, the role will involve raising “the quality of public architecture and urban design across the city — and the level of civic conversation about those subjects.” This dramatic shift from the question: what is the role of the critic and architecture criticism in shaping civic architecture?

Modular Installation Provides Temporary Housing For Refugees Beneath Paris Bridge

12:00 - 24 March, 2018
Courtesy of 1week1project
Courtesy of 1week1project

As hundreds of refugees continue to arrive in Paris, France, the city faces an ongoing struggle to find safe and suitable housing for the influx of migrants. As a result, many end up sleeping in underused urban spaces or on the side of the road with almost no access to water, sanitation, and food.

In response, Paris- and Santiago-based firm 1week1project in collaboration with Sophie Picoty unveil their design for a speculative public park titled “Illuminate Paris!” beneath an elevated railway bridge to provide additional support for organizations handling the influx of refugees. This modular “field of experiences” features a series of lantern-like environments forming a canopy along the underside of the bridge that allows for much-need space for migrants who are currently forced to sleep in encampments under similar infrastructure and in parks.

Courtesy of 1week1project Courtesy of 1week1project Courtesy of 1week1project Courtesy of 1week1project + 11

Contemporary Architecture Captured by Mexican Photographers

08:00 - 17 March, 2018
via Portada
via Portada

The history of Mexican photography has contributed to highlighting Mexico's presence in the world. Photographers like Elsa Medina, Lola Álvarez Bravo, Graciela Iturbide, Maya Goded, and Juan Rulfo have masterfully portrayed the life of the buildings, houses and the streets of a rapidly built, nineteenth-century Mexico. 

As a consequence, the contemporary scene of Mexican photography has become a fundamental tool for architecture and has contributed to a better visual understanding of the works that are erected every day.

Photography and architecture are two disciplines that go hand in hand and whose relationship has been reinforced thanks to the digital tools that we currently have. For that reason, we have compiled the work of contemporary Mexican photographers who record our walk through the world we live in and contribute to constructing the image of contemporary Mexico. 

MAS in Collective Housing is Celebrating Its 10th Anniversary

Sponsored Article
MAS in Collective Housing is Celebrating Its 10th Anniversary, MAS IN COLLECTIVE HOUSING
MAS IN COLLECTIVE HOUSING

The MAS in Collective Housing is celebrating its 10th anniversary and we want to share our happiness for that achievement. After having here 256 alumni from 38 different countries, and 70 international workshops, we are convinced that we are doing right. The application period for the 2019 edition is already opened.

99% Invisible Investigates the Utopian and Dystopian Histories of the Bijlmermeer

14:00 - 10 March, 2018
99% Invisible Investigates the Utopian and Dystopian Histories of the Bijlmermeer, © <a href=‘https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Janericloebe'>Wikimedia user Janericloebe</a>licensed under<a href='https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/deed.en/'>CC BY-SA 3.0</a>
© Wikimedia user Janericloebelicensed underCC BY-SA 3.0

How can we plan a better city? The answer has confounded architects and urban planners since the birth of the industrial city. One attempt at answering came in the form of a spectacular modernist proposal outside of Amsterdam called the Bijlmermeer. And, as a new two-part episode by 99% Invisible reveals, it failed miserably. But, like all histories, the story is not as simple as it first appears. 

3 Tips for Designing Quiet Apartment Buildings on Abnormally Noisy Sites

09:30 - 8 March, 2018
© Alexander Severin
© Alexander Severin

New York-based Stephen B Jacobs Group has almost completed construction on a pair of towers at 29-26 Northern Boulevard in Long Island City. Dubbed the QE7 for its adjacency to the Q, E, and 7 trains (not to mention its cruise ship-like amenities), the pair of towers will contain 467 units, including 13 floors dedicated to the largest co-living development in North America. What makes this building so unique, however, is how the architects and engineers devised a solution to overcome noise generated by the three neighboring subway lines.

Modern cities, especially New York, are always looking for ways to increase density, which often means building in locations that were once overlooked due to their particular site conditions. We spoke with SBJGroup principal Isaac-Daniel Astrachan to find out how his firm managed to reduce noise levels on this site.

These 6 Firms Are Spearheading the Post-Digital Drawing Craze in Mexico

14:00 - 4 March, 2018
Cortesía de PALMA
Cortesía de PALMA

The hyperrealistic representation of architecture is not a new concept due to the ubiquity of tools that offer the possibility of creating perplexing images with photographs. However, those who defend the expressive capacity of hand drawings have found ways to take advantage of the digital tools of the last decades to represent their architectural projects. 

A new group of young Mexican architects is committed to a form of representation that relies on tools from our era, simultaneously taking up concepts from the sixties and seventies, where the technique of collage made it possible to face the frustrating reality that took place at the time to represent the utopias thought up by architects. 

What Books Have Shaped Your Career as an Architect?

06:00 - 26 February, 2018
What Books Have Shaped Your Career as an Architect?, © Mónica Arellano
© Mónica Arellano

Everyone knows that becoming an architect translates to a lot of time in front of a computer screen, or on-site or in the model shop—or waiting for renders to finish. But we also know that being a good architect is about much more; truly savvy architects and really thoughtful projects often spring from strong theoretical, philosophical or practical trains of thought (and they are not always directly inspired by architecture itself!).

Art Jameel Announces New Multidisciplinary Art Center in Saudi Arabia

16:00 - 4 February, 2018
Art Jameel Announces New Multidisciplinary Art Center in Saudi Arabia, Courtesy of Art Jameel
Courtesy of Art Jameel

Thanks to Art Jameel, a Middle Eastern non-profit arts organization, a new arts district is taking shape in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Since the crowning of Prince Mohammad bin Salman, Saudi Arabia has shifted focus from oil to arts and technology. The new multidisciplinary art center, named Hayy, is a 17,000 square meter step in the right direction.

Top Global Destinations On The Rise According to TripAdvisor

08:00 - 4 February, 2018
Top Global Destinations On The Rise According to TripAdvisor, © <a href='https://pixabay.com/en/coral-reefs-island-ishigaki-island-1381740/'> Pixabay user auntmasako </a> licensed under <a href='https://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/deed.en'>CC0</a>
© Pixabay user auntmasako licensed under CC0

TripAdvisor announced the World’s Top Destinations “on the rise” according to the 2018 Travelers’ Choice awards. According to TripAdvisor, the winning cities are based on millions of comments posted on the site each year. They also look for cities with an increase in search traffic and user interest to make reservations. 

This years list includes ten cities. Keep reading to find out which ten cities were chosen by TripAdvisor world travelers:

The Politics of Vacancy: The History, and Future, of Toronto's Condo Euphoria

09:30 - 2 February, 2018
The Politics of Vacancy: The History, and Future, of Toronto's Condo Euphoria, © Manuel Alvarez Diestro
© Manuel Alvarez Diestro

The City of Toronto has a long, fraught relationship with development and vacancy. The map of the initial Toronto Purchase of 1787 between the Mississaugas of the New Credit First Nation and the British Crown, which would later establish the colonial territory that became Toronto, conceives of the landscape as a single, clearly defined vacant lot anxious for development. Or, as artist Luis Jacob better described it, “signifying nothing but an empty page waiting to be inscribed at will.” Over two-hundred years later, as housing availability, prices, and rental shortages drive vertical condominium developments in the city, the politics of the vacant lot have never felt so palpable.

The first condominiums appeared in Toronto during the late 1960s as a solution to a crisis of affordable housing. By 1981, the newspaper The Globe and Mail would prophetically report that "vacant lots all over downtown Toronto are sprouting condominiums of late.” The Globe would further lament that "no sooner has one of the glamorous edifices begun to climb the Toronto skyline than the sold out sign is posted, and the next development announced.” After a 30% drop in prices during the 1990s, the early 2000s saw the expansion of Toronto’s “condo euphoria” with sites zoned across the Greater Toronto Area from CityPlace to College Park. Now, these towering edifices—captured here by photographer Manuel Alvarez Diestro—have become icons of both the city’s downtown identity as well as capital-driven development.

© Manuel Alvarez Diestro © Manuel Alvarez Diestro © Manuel Alvarez Diestro © Manuel Alvarez Diestro + 24

Architecture On Screen: Illustrated Plans From 6 Award-Winning Films of 2017

09:30 - 31 January, 2018

Why does a film garner critical acclaim? Is it captivating performances from its actors? Stunning tableaus and cinematic moments? Or, could it be the intricate sets where tales of drama, laughter, love, and loss play out? 

Following her stunning watercolor prints of last year’s Oscar nominees and the Netflix sensation Stranger Things, architect and illustrator Boryana Ilieva provides a glimpse into the elaborate sets of 6 stand-out films from 2017. With the Golden Globes broadcasted earlier this month and the Academy Awards only a few weeks away, the homes in these award-winning motion pictures deserve as many accolades as the Hollywood stars who inhabit them.

© Boryana Ilieva © Boryana Ilieva © Boryana Ilieva © Boryana Ilieva + 9

These Delicate Illustrations Turn Images of Urban Density into Art

09:30 - 27 January, 2018
The Layered City. Image Courtesy of Alina Sonea
The Layered City. Image Courtesy of Alina Sonea

Trained in Architecture, Urban Design, and Theory, Alina Sonea illustrates the complex and often paradoxical nature of the cities we inhabit. The Feldkirch-based artist and architect has, since 2013, completed a series of detailed illustrations that employ graphic yet delicate black lines to render dense images of fantastical metropolises.

Density. Image Courtesy of Alina Sonea ArchiTEXTURES - The Renaissance. Image Courtesy of Alina Sonea Feldkirch. Image Courtesy of Alina Sonea Illusions. Image Courtesy of Alina Sonea + 9

What Is the Best Camera (and Camera Equipment) for Architectural Photography?

09:30 - 25 January, 2018

A great photograph is often as important as a great building—sometimes even more. From the pages of glossy magazines to the galleries of digital publications and online portfolios, high-quality photography is crucial for contemporary architects. Yet the array of camera options, equipment, accessories, and technical jargon (aperture, ISO, shutter-speed, etc.) can be dizzying, if not intimidating. So what happens when the camera in your iPhone is no longer enough? 

To ensure emerging practitioners and professionals alike take the perfect shot, Eric Reinholdt summarizes at length the photography equipment used in his own practice in this two-part video from 2016. The first instalment on the architect, writer, and photographer's channel 30X40 Workshop makes it clear that his preference is a digital SLR camera. The 20+ megapixel image quality as well as range of larger aperture lenses with added versatility are crucial features for large format printing and digital publishing. Canon and Nikon are among the suggested brands as they are established with a large offering of products. And, are expected to provide additional upgrade paths as new equipment is released.