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DEEJ Factory / 5+design

00:00 - 14 August, 2017
DEEJ Factory / 5+design, Courtesy of 5+design
Courtesy of 5+design

Courtesy of 5+design Courtesy of 5+design Courtesy of 5+design Courtesy of 5+design + 58

  • Architects

  • Location

    Jinan, Shandong, China
  • Area

    131739.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2017

Why China's Copy-Cats Are Good For Architecture

00:00 - 9 April, 2013
Why China's Copy-Cats Are Good For Architecture, Wangjing SOHO: Northwest Aerial © Zaha Hadid Architects
Wangjing SOHO: Northwest Aerial © Zaha Hadid Architects

When we see another Eiffel Tower, idyllic English village, or, most recently, a Zaha Hadid shopping mall, copied in China, our first reaction is to scoff. Heartily. To suggest that it is - once again - evidence of China’s knock-off culture, its disregard for uniqueness, its staggering lack of innovation. 

Even I, reporting on the Chinese copy of the Austrian town of Halstatt, fell into the rhetorical trap: “The Chinese are well-known for their penchant for knock-offs, be it brand-name handbags or high-tech gadgets, but this time, they’ve taken it to a whole other level.” Moreover, as Guy Horton has noted, we are keen to describe designers in the West as “emulating,” “imitating,” and “borrowing”; those in the East are almost always “pirating.”

However, when we allow ourselves, even unconsciously, to settle into the role of superior scoffer, we do not just the Chinese, but ourselves, a disservice: first, we fail to recognize the fascinating complexity that lies behind China’s built experimentation with Western ideals; and, what’s more, we fail to look in the mirror at ourselves, and trouble our own unquestioned values and supposed superiority.

In the next few paragraphs, I’d like to do both.