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AA Visiting School Amazon

13:34 - 30 May, 2017
AA Visiting School Amazon

Research shows that sea levels around the world have been rising for many decades due to global warming. The consequences of this will put hundreds of cities at risk of being flooded. Similarly, water levels in the Mamori Lake vary greatly between the dry and wet season, when the river can grow up to 14 meters flooding the forest and changing the physiognomy of the land. Currently, local houses are built on stilts to deal with tidal variations but in recent years, this has not always been enough to prevent the river from causing devastation.

FITECO / Colboc Franzen & Associes

00:00 - 13 September, 2010
FITECO / Colboc Franzen & Associes, © Cécile Septet
© Cécile Septet

© Cécile Septet © Cécile Septet © Cécile Septet © Cécile Septet + 19

  • Architects

  • Location

    Changé, France
  • Project Architect

    Géraud Pin-Barras
  • Project Team

    Benjamin Colboc, Ulrich Faudry, Manuela Franzen, Jean-Pierre Pommerol, Arnaud Sachet, Aesa Windels
  • Engineering

    BETHAC
  • Structural Engineering

    FOISNET- OREBAT
  • Client

    Groupe FITECO
  • General Contractor

    SCI Laval Parc Investissement
  • Area

    7005.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2010
  • Photographs