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  2. Bela Vista

Bela Vista: The Latest Architecture and News

Expansion of Apartment in Brazil Building / Alvorada Arquitetos

© Pedro Kok© Pedro Kok© Pedro Kok© Pedro Kok+ 20

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  50
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2020
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: AutoDesk, Grohe, Bombalanço, Brilia, Clatt, +12

Renovation of a House in Bixiga Neighbourhood / Marcus Lima Arquitetura e Urbanismo

© Pedro Vannucchi
© Pedro Vannucchi

© Pedro Vannucchi© Pedro Vannucchi© Pedro Vannucchi© Pedro Vannucchi+ 27

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  1506 ft²
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2019
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Adilson C. De Sousa, Arbs Depósito de Materiais de Construção, Deca, Geraldo Nunes, Legno Esquadrias, +4

Commercial Complex in Roosevelt Square / Pianca Arquitetura

© Manuel Sá© Manuel Sá© Manuel Sá© Manuel Sá+ 25

Japan House São Paulo / Kengo Kuma & Associates + FGMF

© Tatewaki NIO© Rogério Cassimiro© Rogério Cassimiro© Tatewaki NIO+ 11

  • Area Area of this architecture project Area:  2244
  • Year Completion year of this architecture project Year:  2017
  • Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project
    Manufacturers: Ductal®

Moreira Salles Institute / Andrade Morettin Arquitetos Associados

© Nelson Kon© Nelson Kon© Nelson Kon© Nelson Kon+ 60

Bela Vista, Brazil

Architecture Classics: Teatro Oficina / Lina Bo Bardi & Edson Elito

© Nelson Kon© Nelson Kon© Nelson Kon© Nelson Kon+ 40

The Teatro Oficina Uzyna Uzona, popularly known as Teatro Oficina, located on Jaceguai Street, in the Bela Vista neighborhood, in São Paulo, was founded in 1958 by José Celso Martinez Correa. The Teatro Oficina acts as a manifesto/theater, marked by great spectacles between theatrical expressions, musical presentations, dance, and performances.

Over time, the theater sought to revolutionize the performances that they put on. To this end, the architecture was designed to "collaborate" with the events, allowing the drama of the spectacle to engage more profoundly with audiences. Edson Elito, who would later instigate this reform, said [trans.]: