Martijn de Geus

Martijn is an award-winning Beijing based Dutch architect. He has been in China since 2010, and received PhD training under Chinese master architect Li Xiaodong, after being trained as an architect at TU Delft, in the Netherlands.

In China, at Tsinghua University's School of Architecture, he is teaching in, and co-ordinating the international Master's Program in Architecture. Martijn combines his academic work with projects as co-founder of the office maison h / 汉荷设计, an international architecture practice with offices in China and the Netherlands.

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Tips for Design Studio Teaching in the Age of COVID-19

Since the recent COVID-19 quarantine restrictions were enforced, social media has been filled with images of employees working from home, students transitioning to home-school learning, and friends and family socializing via Skype calls and Zoom meetings. With the outpouring of tips for how to work from home, and how to keep a regular routine during these certain times, many people are questioning how to create a long term plan for online studio design instruction.

This article aims to provide some practical tips to schools and students around the globe based on our experience with online design studio teaching in our Master program at Tsinghua University’s School of Architecture since February.

China Projections

Image Courtesy of Martijn de Geus
. Fig.8 - Qing Dynasty - by Xu Yang - Springtime in the Capital
Image Courtesy of Martijn de Geus
. Fig.8 - Qing Dynasty - by Xu Yang - Springtime in the Capital

This article serves as a brief introduction to a way of thinking that I assume to be foreign and new to most of the readers. It is based on some observations I’ve made during the past 5 years as part of my PhD research into the comparison between two traditions of architectural representation, between China and Europe, under guidance of prof. Li Xiaodong at Tsinghua University in Beijing. With that in mind this article has no pretension, nor the proper length, to fully convey the complexity of the representations of architectural space in drawings from China, but should be seen as a first try to communicate some of these ideas to a wider audience.

Image Courtesy of Martijn de Geus
. Fig.1 - (Han Dynasty) ca 1st AD - Zhaoyaocun ‘First’ Birdseye Landscape PaintingImage Courtesy of Martijn de Geus
. Fig.2-(Northern Song Dynasty) - by Li Cheng - A Solitary Temple Amid Clearing PeaksImage Courtesy of Martijn de Geus
. Fig.2- (Northern Song Dynasty) Li Cheng - A Solitary Temple Amid Clearing Peaks (zoom a) Image Courtesy of Martijn de Geus
. Fig.2- (Northern Song Dynasty) Li Cheng - A Solitary Temple Amid Clearing Peaks (zoom b)+ 11