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Despite a bad reputation in children's stories, straw buildings can be sustainable, comfortable, and, above all, solid and resistant. Several studies and experiments have been carried out with this agricultural waste substance, qualifying it as an potential material for the construction of walls, with good thermal, acoustic, and even structural characteristics. In addition, it is a renewable resource and easily constructed. Below, we'll talk about the characteristics of this material and how much more it would take than the breath of a big bad wolf to bring down a house made of straw. Straw is a leftover remnant from grain production, usually wheat, rice or barley. After the edible part of the grain is harvested, the stems end up discarded and are often burned. Instead of wasting them, however, the stems can be compacted into rectangular bales, which can be stacked and used as fillers or even as self-supporting walls in a technique known as the “Nebraska” style, widely used in the 19th century on the plains of this US state. While field bales can support around 900 kg per linear meter, high density blocks of the same material, compacted by machines, are designed to support up to almost 6000 kg / m [1].  View more View full description
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