All
Projects
Products
Events
Competitions

8 Interior Acoustic Panels and Their Constructive Details

8 Interior Acoustic Panels and Their Constructive Details

Picture this. You're in a restaurant and you can hear the conversation of the person in the table next to you better than the person you're sitting with. Then, everyone begins to speak louder, making the environment chaotic. Absorption, reflection, reverberation, frequency, decibels, etc. Although acoustics is a complex science that can render buildings almost uninhabitable when not properly thought out, architects do not always possess the theoretical resources nor have the necessary concern to develop acoustically comfortable spaces.

BISA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam GETA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam TOBA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam SAPA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam + 37

Upon reaching a surface such as a wall, object or ceiling, part of the sound energy is absorbed, some of it passes through the surface and another part is reflected back into space. An acoustically adequate space is one which achieves a balance between absorption and reflection, according to the needs of its use. There are spaces where it is important to absorb most sounds, such as in a restaurant, while in others the balance between reflection and absorption is most desirable, such as in concert halls and theaters.

GETA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam
GETA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam

However, when we think of acoustic solutions, images of egg carton-lined walls and foam panels often come to mind. Fortunately there are products that allow interior walls to be coated in an aesthetic way while improving the acoustic quality of the space. Mikodam develops wall panels that adequately absorb sound energy, while creating sleek interior spaces for architectural projects. When high absorption of various frequencies is required, their panels come with perforations of varying diameters, providing the ideal reverberation desired for any room. In addition to absorption, all wall coverings provide effective sound dispersion for different frequencies, according to their varying lengths, widths and depths.

Panels with Triangular Patterns

GETA

GETA
GETA
GETA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam
GETA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam

In wall applications, three-dimensional triangles constitute an interesting pattern - in addition to absorption, variations of this type of panel can provide effective sound dispersion for the frequency range of 250 Hz to 2000 Hz due to the differences in depth and length of each element within the modules. This allows a uniform distribution of sound in the room where they are applied, avoiding acoustic defects that cause disturbances caused by sudden sound reflections, acoustic brightness, and echoes. GETA is available with both a full and mixed drilling option that can be used for medium absorption in large and small rooms where additional absorption is required to provide optimal acoustic comfort.  Another option is to use fabric instead of wood for the upper section to further enhance the panels' acoustic qualities.

GETA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam
GETA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam

VERO

VERO. Image Cortesia de Mikodam
VERO. Image Cortesia de Mikodam

VERO panels allow for an increase in acoustic insulation. Their triangular lines bring a dynamic pattern to the walls, and modules can be rotated and accommodated to make their final appearance more complex.

VERO
VERO
VERO. Image Cortesia de Mikodam
VERO. Image Cortesia de Mikodam

Undulated and Angled Panels

FILA

FILA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam
FILA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam

Due to the varying angles and different sized depths/projections of each module, it can provide effective sound scattering in between a range of 500 Hz to 8000 Hz. This allows an even distribution of sound within the room where they are applied and prevents acoustical defects causing disturbance due to harsh sound reflections, acoustical glare, echo or flutter echo. In addition, perforated surfaces with 2 alternative diameters and fabric surfaces are also available. Its modules can be combined and applied on curved surfaces.

FILA
FILA
FILA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam
FILA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam

HAZA

HAZA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam
HAZA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam

With its convex waves, Haza's surface is highly effective in the dispersion of sound, especially when compared to a solid, flat panel. Haza was inspired by the acoustic panels used in Zaha Hadid Architects' Heydar Aliyev Center auditorium, manufactured by IKOOR by Mikodam. The panels provide the highest acoustic qualities for the auditorium that is used for conferences. Detailed studies have determined the curvatures for the correct rate of reverberation and absorption, considering the organic shape of the building.

HAZA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam
HAZA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam
HAZA
HAZA

Striped Panels

SAPA

SAPA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam
SAPA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam

This type of panel provides effective sound dispersion due to its variations in both the depth and length of each element. It also delivers an organic look when placed next to other modules.

SAPA
SAPA
SAPA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam
SAPA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam

KARA

KARA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam
KARA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam

KARA's acoustic characteristics depend on the material chosen for the rear panel. Fabric, for instance, provides better absorption compared to wood or mirrors. In addition, repetitive depths of the linear elements allows a better dispersion of sound.

KARA
KARA
KARA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam
KARA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam

Conventional Modular Panels

BISA

BISA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam
BISA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam

With or without lighting, the panels offer the possibility of customizing interior spaces adapted to the acoustic needs of the environment - puncture rate options allow small to large sections to be drilled, with fully drilled panels allowing for maximum absorption. Various combinations can be created with different color and material options. In addition, perforated surfaces with 2 alternative diameters are also available. Oak, walnut, teak, lacquer, and fabric combinations are the current choices of standard material.

BISA
BISA
BISA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam
BISA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam

TOBA

TOBA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam
TOBA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam
TOBA
TOBA

TOBA is the most traditional type of panel, offering varying absorption characteristics according to the amount of drilling involved.

TOBA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam
TOBA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam

If before we sought to conceal the acoustic elements in projects at any cost, we now see that through careful detail and aesthetically pleasing shapes and materials, the acoustic panels can be incorporated into architectural and interior projects as protagonists of the spaces.

 

 

 

Project gallery

See all Show less
About this author
Cite: "8 Interior Acoustic Panels and Their Constructive Details" [8 painéis acústicos internos e seus detalhes de construção] 09 Jul 2019. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/918600/8-interior-acoustic-panels-and-their-constructive-details/> ISSN 0719-8884
HAZA. Image Cortesia de Mikodam

8种室内声学面板及其构造细节

You've started following your first account!

Did you know?

You'll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.