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Unlike the previously featured Vanna Venturi House, Peter Eisenman's House VI includes disorientation in the work without the concept of relating it to the traditional home. The house is, in fact, anything but what one would consider a conventional house. Eisenman, one of the New York Five, designed the house for Mr. and Mrs. Richard Frank between 1972-1975 who found great admiration for the architect's work despite previously being known as a "paper architect" and theorist. By giving Eisenman a chance to put his theories to practice, one of the most famous, and difficult, houses emerged in the United States. Situated on a flat site in Cornwall, Connecticut House VI stands its own ground as a sculpture in its surroundings. The design emerged from a conceptual process that began with a grid. Eisenman manipulated the grid in a way so that the house was divided into four sections and when completed the building itself could be a "record of the design process." Therefore structural elements, were revealed so that the construction process was evident, but not always understood. View more View full description
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