Welfare Centre for Children and Teenagers / Marjan Hessamfar & Joe Vérons

Welfare Centre for Children and Teenagers / Marjan Hessamfar & Joe Vérons

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© Vincent Fillon

« Maison d’accueil de l’enfance Eleanor Roosevelt » is an emergency residential centre managed by the local department of child welfare (Aide Sociale à l’Enfance- ASE) in Paris. It provides emergency shelter for minors under legal guardianship.

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© Vincent Fillon

The main purpose of the centre is to provide practical, educational and psychological support to these children and teenagers. Moving the centre from its current location in the 14th arrondissement will allow an increase in capacity and will help broaden the centre’s services. Semavip, a semi public company, is in charge of developing the area which already has a cinema, a residential circus and a park, « jardin public Serge Gainsbourg », which has been open to the public since the summer of 2010.

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© Vincent Fillon

The origin of the program:

An emergency residential centre is both a children’s shelter and a care home where young people feel welcomed, protected and looked after. It is also a transitional place, where family links, rather than being severed, are encouraged under calm and compassionate supervision.

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© Vincent Fillon

The notion of « emergency » must not be sensed by children who indeed need to feel reassured: this is a place where, at long last, they can be completely safe. It is also paramount that every effort is made to ensure their continuous educational needs are met.

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Ground Floor Plan

With all this in mind, the architects designed the shelter as a shame where each floor is allocated to one age group only and where all children’s needs, from quiet time to group activity, are respected.

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© Vincent Fillon

Architectural tone:

There are two major constraints on the site. Firstly, the core of the plot is north facing. Secondly, the architectural program is highly dense and is not easily accommodated with the principal development zone plans. This could potentially result in severe lack of light into the building.

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© Vincent Fillon

The architects therefore developed and L shaped structure with varying stepped levels in the centre, offering large recreational terraces on each floor. This layered system optimises access to daylight and open views at the very core of the building.

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First Floor Plan

However, to optimise access to daylight further still, the architects decided to position the buildings around enclosed gardens with two main facade walls to the south and the west.

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© Vincent Fillon

Space management:

Since the building is open to the public (ERP), organisation of space is very complex. Each floor is meant as a single unit with its own specific use and therefore its own health and safety regulations.

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© Vincent Fillon

The creche on level 5 falls under R classification (French code of standards for education premises) whereas treatment and healthcare rooms on the ground floor and on level 4 fall under U classification (French code of standards for healthcare premises). The difficulty arose from managing different strict health and safety regulations, yet keeping a single identity for the whole building. For instance, the creche playground is made private and safe with the use of trees in large pots all around the area.

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© Vincent Fillon

This type of institution is subject to constant change not only during the life of the building itself but also at all stages of the project. With this in mind, the architects have designed the building as a matrix giving scope for change not only once completed but also during the various stages of the project studies. For instance, the large corridors have not only be designed as passageways but can also have other purposes if need be.

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© Vincent Fillon

Indoor environment and choice of materials:

To maintain a homely feel throughout, the architects were also asked to design indoor signage and furniture. Regular consultation with staff helped them create poetic, fun and dream like pictograms on indoor sign posts. They also chose to make the main staircase a major focal point like in a stately home. Emphasis was put on designing purpose built furniture.

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© Vincent Fillon

The facade wall is wood framed with metal cladding whilst pillars, beams and floors are made from concrete. The concrete structure of beams and pillars gives the whole construction a certain degree of flexibility. This was necessary to ensure separate departments can function on different floors.

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Section A

Exterior precast concrete elements are made out of electroless white cement. Concrete is therefore self cleaning. It won’t change colour over time, and will keep its original look.

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© Vincent Fillon

This choice of self cleaning material is important to combat bad weather and pollution due to intense traffic - there are two major Parisian ring roads nearby- This could otherwise discolour the exterior.

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Section B

Gold coloured louvre shutters are used to protect rooms from the sun and also to ensure users privacy. White concrete, gold shutters and black ironwork are used on all facades thus reinforcing a homogenous feel for the whole centre.

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© Vincent Fillon

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Project location

Address:Porte des Lilas, 75019 Paris, France

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Location to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address.
About this office
Cite: "Welfare Centre for Children and Teenagers / Marjan Hessamfar & Joe Vérons" 03 Feb 2015. ArchDaily. Accessed . <https://www.archdaily.com/592912/welfare-centre-for-children-and-teenagers-marjan-hessamfar-and-joe-verons> ISSN 0719-8884

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