Can Waste Be Used to Regenerate Our Cities?

Trash Cubes © Science Photo Library via the BBC

With the rise of urban dwellers comes the rise of urban waste. And, although the hidden life of garbage is still ignored by many, there is no way of escaping one of modern societies most pressing issues: unsustainable . Though many plausible and obvious solutions have already been suggested and are ready to be implemented, some experts are proposing radical solutions that may one day be a reality.

Could our rubbish be refabricated to become the fundamental building block of our future ? This is the latest radical idea being suggested on the BBC’s Building Tomorrow series by Terreform ONE architect Mitchell Joachim. Read Joachim’s complete article on the BBC here and let us know if you think our ‘smart cities’ could be made of ‘smart trash’ in the comment section below. 

Chicago’s Cook County Aims to Eradicate Demolition Waste

Image via Cook County

Cook County, Illinois, recently brought the elimination of construction waste to a new level by creating the first demolition debris ordinance in the Midwest. This groundbreaking ordinance requires most of the debris created from demolition to be recycled and reused instead of being sent to the landfill. The ordinance helps contribute to Cook County’s zero waste goal, part of the Update.

The new law states that at least 7 percent of suburban construction and demolition debris must be recycled, and an additional 5 percent must be reused on residential properties. This new legislation will have a great impact as it affects about 2.5 million suburban Cook County residents.

More after the break…

Nosara Recycling Plant / sLAB

 


Visit the Kickstarter Campaign here.

 

A small group of students and architect Tobias Holler of sLAB Costa Rica at the New York Institute of Technology, have teamed up to design and build a communal for Nosara, Costa Rica – a city that is facing grave problems with sanitation and illegal dumping of garbage on beaches and in wildlife areas. Construction started last summer after a Kickstarter campaign that raised $15,000 helped provide expenses and costs associated with housing the students that assisted with the construction. A relaunch of the Kickstarter campaign will provide the project with additional funds to bring the students back to accelerate the pace of construction. The funds also support the documentary by Ayana de Vos, whose film follows the progress of the project and features and sustainability in Costa Rica.

Join us after the break for more.