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University Of Wisconsin Milwaukee

Joshua Prince-Ramus Wins $100,000 Marcus Prize

14:12 - 25 September, 2015
Joshua Prince-Ramus Wins $100,000 Marcus Prize, Necklace Residence / REX. Image © Luxigon
Necklace Residence / REX. Image © Luxigon

REX founder Joshua Prince-Ramus has won the $100,000 Marcus Prize. Awarded by the Milwaukee-based Marcus Corporation Foundation, the biennial award is dedicated to honoring emerging designers who've had a decade of exceptional leadership in their field. 

"He is headed to the pantheon of greatness...and yet his ideas are still evolving," said Bob Greenstreet, dean of the School of Architecture and Urban Planning at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, which administers the award.

From Tokyo to Milwaukee: Sou Fujimoto and His Impact on Students at the University of Wisconsin

09:30 - 4 June, 2015
From Tokyo to Milwaukee: Sou Fujimoto and His Impact on Students at the University of Wisconsin, 2013 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion / Sou Fujimoto. Image © Iwan Baan
2013 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion / Sou Fujimoto. Image © Iwan Baan

With the award of the $100,000 Marcus Prize to Sou Fujimoto in 2013, graduate students at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s School of Architecture were offered the rare opportunity to learn from one of Japan's most respected architectural practitioners. Through a semester-long connection to the studio - which he led alongside University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee Associate Professor Mo Zell - Fujimoto and his students have realized a small architectural installation on an unused lot in Milwaukee's East side entitled faBRICK.

In this interview conducted in Tokyo last year, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee student Robert Guertin speaks with Fujimoto about the ideas and themes of his work. In an attempt to shed light on the influence he had in the design of faBRICK, his answers are presented alongside images of the resulting installation.

Construction of the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee's faBRICK Pavilion. Image © Courtesy of University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Architecture Construction of the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee's faBRICK Pavilion. Image © Courtesy of University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Architecture The University of Wisconsin Milwaukee's faBRICK Pavilion. Image © Courtesy of University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Architecture Assembly method of the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee's faBRICK Pavilion. Image © Courtesy of University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Architecture + 15

AD Architecture School Guide: Institute on Aging and Environment, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Architecture and Urban Planning

00:00 - 25 September, 2013
AD Architecture School Guide: Institute on Aging and Environment, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Architecture and Urban Planning, Courtesy of University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Architecture & Urban Planning Facebook Page
Courtesy of University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee School of Architecture & Urban Planning Facebook Page

According to the UN, the elderly population not only exceeds the population of children in developed nations, but will increase more rapidly than any other demographic over the next 50 years -- in fact, it could even triple. 

Although most countries deal with the elderly population through institutionalized care, whether public, as in Canada or in Great Britain, or private, as in the U.S., the quality of care is widely divergent. It’s therefore fitting - and necessary - that the physical environment’s effect on elderly care is becoming a more prominent issue for research. 

One institute that is leading the way in this research is the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee’s School of Architecture and Urban Planning’s Institute on Aging and Environment