Pei Cobb Freed Breaks Ground on Boston’s Tallest Residential Tower

© , Cambridge Seven Associates

Construction has commenced on Pei Cobb Freed & Partners’ 61-story condominium tower in Boston’s historic Back Bay. The $700 million development will be the tallest residential building in the city, and the tallest tower to rise since the 1976 John Hancock Tower, also designed by Pei Cobb Freed.

“The project allows us to consider once again how a tall building, together with the open space it frames, can respond creatively to the need for growth while showing appropriate respect for its historic urban setting,” says Henry Cobb of Pei Cobb Freed & Partners.

14 Architects to Receive 2015 AIA Young Architects Award

930 Poydras Residential Tower / Eskew+Dumez+Ripple. Image © Timothy Hurlsey

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has selected 14 recipients for the 2015 AIA Young Architects Award. This award, now in its 22nd year, honors young architects – licensed 10 years or fewer regardless of their age - who have shown exceptional leadership and made significant contributions to the profession early in their careers. All recipients will be presented the award at the AIA 2015 National Convention and Design Exposition in . View them all, after the break.

Win a Set of LEGO® Architecture’s Newly Released Lincoln Memorial

© ®

We announced earlier this month that the LEGO® Architecture series will now include the Lincoln Memorial in Washington DC! Thanks to LEGO® Architecture, two of our US readers now have the chance to win their very own set.

Official Rules: To participate, let us know what existing LEGO® Architecture set is your favorite. All you have to do is become a registered user at ArchDaily and leave us your answer in the comments below. Two winners will be chosen at random from entries received between Monday, January 26th and Sunday, February 1st at 11:59 EST. Anyone in the  is welcome to participate. One entry per person. ArchDaily will enforce verification and remove duplicated ones before choosing the winner.

Good luck!

How Americans Get to Work

Interactive: How Americans Get to Work. Image Courtesy of flowingdata.com

In the US, most people drive alone to work. This isn’t surprising, considering car culture has been a staple of American life since the end of World War II. However, with the potential of high speed rails making way in California and the push for public transit in many other states, it will be interesting to see how this map may (or may not) change over the next decade.

This interactive infographic, provided by flowingdata.com, illustrates the work-related usage rates for all varying modes of transportation throughout every county in the US. Click here to see.

Tiny-House Villages: Safe Havens for the Homeless

Quixote Village. Image © Leah Nash for BuzzFeed

As the need for smart housing solutions rises, so does the appeal of tiny-house villages, not just as shelter for the homeless, but as a possible look to the future of the sector. The new article, Are Tiny-House Villages The Solution To Homelessness? by Tim Murphy, takes a closer look into the positive and negative aspects of these controversial communities, as well as their social and political ramifications so far. Through interviews with residents of several tiny-house villages, Murphy investigates the current impacts they have had on the homeless populations within major American , and questions how the lifestyle will evolve in the future. Read the full article, here.

Redesigning Los Angeles For Long-Term Drought

River (2013). Image © Flickr CC User Steve Lyon

With many of the world’s cities combating drought, it is apparent that channeling water away from populated areas with no intended use is not sustainable. Cities are depending on their “precious rain water” more than ever and, as Arid Lands Institute co-founder Hadley Arnold says, “the ace in our species pocket is the ability to innovate.” We need to “build cities like sponges,” starting with permeable hardscape, drought-tolerant landscaping and smarter plumbing. See what NPR has to say about issue of water treatment and Los Angeles, here.

Warren Woods Passive House / GO Logic

© Trent Bell

Architects: GO Logic
Location: , ME, USA
Design Team: Matthew O’Malia, RA, Principal, Timothy Lock, RA, Project Architect, Riley Pratt
Year: 2014
Photographs: Trent Bell

NCARB to Assist Brazil with Regulating Architectural Licensure

Courtesy of uia2020rio.org

The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) has formed an agreement with the Conselho de Arquitetura e Urbanismo do Brasil (CAU/BR) to “exchange information and share best practices” regarding the regulation of architectural licensure and professional standards.

is pleased to be in a position to help strengthen and solidify its regulatory approach governing architects,” said NCARB President Dale McKinney, FAIA, NCARB. “We are also excited to learn from ’s activities, including its effective national system of monitoring various aspects of architectural practice.”

360 Architecture Tops New Atlanta Stadium with Retractable “Roof Petals”

Courtesy of New Stadium

A fly-through over the new Atlanta Falcons’ stadium has been released, revealing an unprecedented retractable roof designed by 360 Architecture (recently acquired by HOK). According to the stadium’s official website, the Pantheon-inspired stadium’s “eight unique roof petals” can rotate open in less than eight minutes, much like a “camera lens.” It will also be clad in a translucent ETFE fabric that, when closed, will allow natural light to pass into its interior.

The video, after the break.

AIA Says December ABI Closed 2014 on “Solid Footing”

December 2014 . Image Courtesy of CalculatedRiskBlog.com

Rising from a score of 50.9 to 52.2 in December, the Architecture Billings Index (ABI) closed 2014 on “solid footing.” As reported by the American Institute of Architects (AIA), design services continued to increase throughout the majority of last year and all regions, except the Northeast, experienced favorable conditions.

“Business conditions continue to be the strongest at architecture firms in the South and the Western regions,” said AIA Chief Economist Kermit Baker, Hon. AIA, PhD. “Particularly encouraging is the continued solid upturn in design activity at institutional firms, since public sector facilities were the last nonresidential building project type to recover from the downturn.”

A breakdown of regional highlights, after the break.

Phoenix House / Anderson Anderson Architecture

© Anthony Vizzari

Architects: Anderson Anderson Architecture
Location: , CA, USA
Architect In Charge: Mark Anderson, Peter Anderson
Design Team: Anderson, Peter Anderson, Johnson Tang, Yevgeniy Ossipov, Gennifer Muñoz, Yingying Xue, Jia Wu, Chris Campbell
Project Manager: Yevgeniy Ossipov
Area: 3700.0 ft2
Photographs: Anthony Vizzari

United States Courthouse – Salt Lake City / Thomas Phifer and Partners

© Scott Frances

Architects: Thomas Phifer and Partners
Location: , UT, USA
Thomas Phifer Project Team: Thomas Phifer AIA, Managing Partner Stephen Dayton AIA, Project Partner Mitch Crowder
, Ina Ko
, Katie Bennett
, Robert Chan
, Rebecca Garnett
, Andrew Mazor
, Jon Benner
, Chien Ho Hsu
Naylor Wentworth Lund Architects Team: Ross Wentworth AIA, Principal, 
Sergey Akhpatelov AIA, Project Partner Steve Squires, Scott Smith, Erin Youngberg, Richard Judkins, Tyler Young, Barbara Fowler, Julio Garcia
Area: 400000.0 ft2
Year: 2014
Photographs: Scott Frances

Diller Scofidio + Renfro Commissioned for New Performing Arts Center in Massachusetts

© Peter Ash Lee / Courtesy of

Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS+R) has been chosen as the winner of a design competition for a new performing arts center at the College of the Holy Cross in , Massachusetts. The competition received submissions from eight world-renowned firms, which were then judged by a selection committee. The $60 million building will tentatively begin construction in 2017, as part of the College’s plan to “Become More: The Campaign of Holy Cross.” DS+R ultimately won the competition due to its diverse design and interdisciplinary nature, just as the College hopes to instill in its students through this addition. 

Hélène Binet: Fragments of Light

Firminy C, architecture by Le Corbusier, 2007, digital b-w silver gelatin print. Courtesy of ammann gallery. Image © Hélène Binet

In the wake of her selection as the recipient of the Julius Shulman Institute Excellence in Photography Award for 2015, Hélène Binet‘s work will be exhibited at the Woodbury University Hollywood (WUHO) Gallery in Los Angeles, . The , entitled Hélène Binet: Fragments of Light, will be open from February 28, 2015 to March 29, 2015, showcasing the highlights of the artist’s career as a renowned architectural photographer. The exhibition will be initiated with an opening reception and award ceremony on February 28, 2015 to honor Binet for her achievements. 

Artplace Offering Grants for Cultural Installations

Courtesy of Artplace

Artplace America is offering up to $3 million in funding to an applicant non-governmental organization (NGO) in six different regions of the US as a part of its Community Development Investments program. Artplace will select these six organizations based on their interest in “sustainably incorporating arts and cultural strategies into the organizations work.” If selected, NGOs will work with financial advisement teams, as well as creative consultants to make the best use of the grant money. To see if your organization is eligible, click here!

Yoko Ono and Project 120 Collaborate to Reimagine Chicago’s Jackson Park

Aerial View of the Park. Image Courtesy of Project 120

Chicago’s Jackson Park is expected to see some big changes in the coming years. Nonprofit organization Project 120 is working to revitalize the park, restoring many of the design aspects implemented by its landscape architect, the famous Frederick Law Olmsted. Alongside this restoration, the park will also receive a new Pavilion, homage to Japan’s gift to the US for the 1893 Columbian Exposition. An outdoor performance space will be added to the park, as will an installation funded by musician and activist Yoko Ono. See the details, after the break.

Sport and Fitness Center for Disabled People / Baldinger Architectural Studio

© Raul Garcia

Architects: Baldinger Architectural Studio
Location: , AZ, USA
Architect In Charge: Ilan Baldinger, Aaron Reddy, Greg Wedge
Area: 45000.0 ft2
Year: 2012
Photographs: Raul Garcia

The Nature Conservancy HQ / MKThink

© Cesar Rubio

Architects: MKThink
Location: , CA, USA
Project Mangement: Studley
Contractor: GCI
Area: 16200.0 ft2
Year: 2014
Photographs: Cesar Rubio