Nonprofit Group ACDU Seeks to Transform Abandoned D.C. Trolley Station

East Platform. Image Courtesy of the Arts Coalition for the Dupont Underground

The Arts Coalition for the Dupont Underground (ACDU) has taken on the task of revitalizing an abandoned trolley station beneath Dupont Circle in the Northwest quadrant of Washington D.C. The nonprofit organization recently signed for a 66-month lease of the property with the District of Columbia’s Office of the Deputy Mayor for Planning and Economic Development. Within that timeframe, the group will transform the space into a permanent cultural hotspot capable of hosting performances, art exhibitions, and other public functions. Learn more, and contribute to the ACDU’s Fundable campaign for this project, after the break.

Society of Architectural Historians 68th Annual International Conference

Courtesy of SAH

The Society of Architectural Historians (SAH) will hold its 68th Annual International Conference in Chicago, , from April 15–19, 2015, with the theme “Chicago at the Global Crossroads.” SAH will celebrate its 75th anniversary during the conference, which includes lectures by Jeanne Gang and Blair Kamin, as well as roundtables and 36 paper sessions covering topics in architecture, art and architectural history, preservation, landscape architecture, and the built environment. SAH is committed to engaging both conference attendees and local participants with public programming that includes over 30 architectural tours, a plenary talk, and a half-day seminar addressing Chicago’s waterways and neighborhoods. Register at sah.org/2015.

Video: Santiago Calatrava On His Design For Ground Zero’s Only Non-Secular Building

In a film for the BBC Magazine, Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava talks through his designs for the new St. Nicholas Church – the only non-secular building on the Memorial site. The building, which broke ground last year, has been described by Calatrava as a ”tiny jewel” for lower Manhattan, comprising of a white Vermont marble shrine sat beneath a translucent central cupola that is illuminated from within. The new church, of Greek Orthodox denomination, replaces a church of the same name which was destroyed during the attacks of . It is sited close to its original location on 130 Liberty Street, overlooking the National September 11 Memorial park and museum. With the building set to open in early 2016, Calatrava discusses the key conceptual ideas and references behind its unique, controversial design.

California Breaks Ground on America’s First High Speed Rail

Proposed Statewide Alignment Map. Image Courtesy of Rail LA

California has broke ground on America’s first high-speed rail line in Fresno, six years after voters first approved an almost $10 billion bond act to fund the project. However, along with celebrations comes skepticism; according to an NPR report, fears of the project’s failure have risen due to the rail line only having a fifth of its funding and that its nearly three-hour journey will still take longer than a flight connecting Los Angeles to San Francisco. Despite this, supporters are optimistic that the line will be and running by 2030. The state will be relying on private investment and revenue from the state’s greenhouse-gas fees to secure the remaining $55 billion needed to complete the $68 billion project.

Built Nostalgia: Why Some Are Lamenting the Death of the Mall

Inside the now abandoned White Flint Mall. Image © Flikr CC License / Mike Kalasnik

We have all visited places that linger with us long after we leave them, often drawing us back through the memories we made there. When recalling this memory of place, however, we rarely consider malls to be evocative of such powerful emotional connections. A recent article from The Huffington Post argues that these common shopping centers can incite some of the deepest nostalgia. “Why I’m Mourning The Death Of A Mall” delves into the connection between malls and their inherent qualities of independence, community, and growth, and encourages us to view them from a different perspective, as our increasingly technology-centric society may make the mall a thing of the past. Read the article, here.

Elizabeth Chu Richter Inaugurated as 2015 AIA President

Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies – Texas A&M Corpus Christi. Image © Richter Architects

, FAIA, CEO of Richter Architects in Corpus Christi, Texas, has been inaugurated as the 91st President of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), succeeding Helene Combs Dreiling, FAIA, in representing over 85,500 AIA members.

“As architects, we use our creativity to serve society—to make our communities better places to live. Through our profession and our life’s work, each of us has shaped and re-shaped the ever-changing narrative that is America in both humble and spectacular ways,” said Richter. “We have created harmony where there was none. We have shown we can see what is not yet there. We have shown we have the courage to grow, to change, and to renew ourselves.”

Read on to learn the three critical issues Richter plans to address during her presidency. 

IN|OUT / WNUK SPURLOCK Architecture

© Bruce Damonte

Architects: WNUK SPURLOCK Architecture
Location: Stinson Beach, CA,
Principal In Charge: Joseph E. Wnuk, AIA, LEED AP; Steven L. Spurlock, FAIA, LEED AP
Year: 2012
Photographs: Bruce Damonte

Bill Clinton to Deliver Keynote Address at 2015 AIA Convention

Courtesy of

The American Institute of Architects (AIA) has announced that former president , founder of the Clinton Foundation, will give the keynote address on May 14 at the 2015 National Convention in Atlanta. Learn more, after the break, and view the convention’s complete schedule, here.

Chefs Club by Food & Wine / Rockwell Group

© Emily Andrews

Architects: Rockwell Group
Location: The Puck Building, 295 Lafayette Street, , NY 10012, USA
Area: 6000.0 ft2
Year: 2014
Photographs: Emily Andrews

Adaptable Sneaker Boutique / UP

Architects: UP
Location: , CA, USA
Concept, Architecture, Design & Motion Graphics : UP
Area: 1860.0 ft2
Year: 2014
Photographs: Carlton Beener

District Hall, Boston’s Public Innovation Center / Hacin + Associates

© Gustav Hoiland, Flagship Photo

Architects: Hacin + Associates
Location: 75 Northern Avenue, Boston, MA 02210,
Landscape Architect: Reed Hilderbrand Associates, Inc
Team: David Hacin, President; Scott Thomson, Project Architect; Matthew Arnold, Project Manager; Nicole Fichera, Designer
Reed Hilderbrand Team: Gary Hilderbrand, Principal; Chris Moyles, Principal/Project Manager; Ryan Wampler, Associate; Leslie Carter, Designer
Year: 2014
Photographs: Gustav Hoiland, Flagship Photo

Demolished: The End of Chicago’s Public Housing

Courtesy of NPR

NPR journalists David Eads and Helga Salinas have published a photographic essay by Patricia Evans alongside their story of ’s public housing. Starting with Evans’ iconic image of a 10-year-old girl swinging at Chicago’s notorious Clarence Darrow high-rises, the story recounts the rise and fall of public housing, the invisible boarders that shaped it and how the city’s most notorious towers became known as “symbols of urban dysfunction.” The complete essay, here.

House Renovation in Boston / Intadesign

© Gustav Hoiland, Flagship Photo

Architects: Intadesign
Location: Boston, MA,
Architect In Charge: Manuela Mariani
Area: 170.0 sqm
Year: 2014
Photographs: Gustav Hoiland, Flagship Photo

How a Le Corbusier Design Helped Define the Architecture of Southern California

© Elizabeth Daniels

We all know that in architecture, few things are truly original. Architects take inspiration from all around them, often taking ideas from the designs of others to reinterpret them in their own work. However, it’s more rare that a single architectural element can be borrowed to define the style of an entire region. As uncovered in this article, originally published by Curbed as “Le Corbusier’s Forgotten Design: SoCal’s Iconic Butterfly Roof,” this is exactly what happened to Le Corbusier, who – despite only completing one building in the US - still had a significant impact on the appearance of the West Coast.

Atop thousands of homes in the warm western regions of the United States are roofs that turn the traditional housetop silhouette on its head. Two panels meet in the middle of the roofline and slope upward and outward, like butterfly wings in mid-flap. This similarity gave the “butterfly roof” its name, and it is a distinct feature of post-war American residential and commercial architecture. In Hawaii, Southern California, and other sun-drenched places, the butterfly roofs made way for high windows that let in natural light. Homes topped with butterfly roofs seemed larger and more inviting.

Credit for the butterfly roof design often goes to architect William Krisel. He began building single-family homes with butterfly rooflines for the Alexander Construction Company, a father-son development team, in Palm Springs, , in 1957. The Alexander Construction Company, mostly using Krisel’s designs, built over 2,500 tract homes in the desert. These homes, and their roofs, shaped the desert community, and soon other architects and developers began building them, too—the popularity of Krisel’s Palm Springs work led to commissions building over 30,000 homes in the Southland from San Diego to the San Fernando Valley.

Northwest Corner Building / Moneo Brock Studio

© Michael Moran

Architects: Rafael Moneo Arquitecto + Moneo Brock Studio
Location: Broadway y 120th Streett, , NY 10010,
Design Architect: Rafael Moneo Valles Arquitecto, Belen Moneo and Jeff Brock
Moneo Brock Studio Project Team: Benjamin Llana, Spencer Leaf, Andrés Barron
Associate Architect: Davis Brody Bond, New York, NY, U.S.A. William Paxson, Partner-in-Charge
Dbba Project Team: Mayine Lynn Yu, David Haft, Fernando Hausch-Fen, Gene Sparling, Mario Samara, Clover Linne, Dohhee Zhoung, Veronique Ross, y James Paxson
Project Management: Columbia University Facilities – Capital Project Management
Area: 188000.0 ft2
Year: 2010
Photographs: Michael Moran

The Broad Reveals Its Honeycomb “Veil”

© Gary Leonard

The final exterior scaffolding has been removed from Diller Scofidio + Renfro’s “The Broad” in downtown Los Angeles, revealing its distinctive honeycomb-like “veil.” Comprised of 2,500 fiberglass reinforced concrete panels and 650 tons of steel, the structural exoskeleton “drapes” over the building’s interior “vault,” lifting at its south and north corners to provide two street-level entrances. At its side, the veil is torn by a central “oculus” that provides a direct visual connection between the museum and Grand Avenue.

will be porous and absorptive, channeling light into its public spaces and galleries. The veil will play a role in the urbanization of Grand Avenue by activating two-way views that connect the museum and the street,” described Liz Diller.

Rhode Island College Art Center / Schwartz-Silver

Courtesy of

Architects: Schwartz-Silver
Location: Providence, RI, USA
Executive Architect: Design Partnership of Cambridge
Area: 54000.0 ft2
Year: 2014
Photographs: Courtesy of Schwartz-Silver

Lincoln Memorial and Flatiron to Join LEGO® Architecture Series

© ®

LEGO® has unveiled the latest buildings to join their architecture series: the Lincoln Memorial and the New York City Flatiron Building. Both will be released in 2015.

The Lincoln Memorial, a national monument honoring the 16th President of the United States, was designed by Henry Bacon and features a sculpture of Lincoln by Daniel Chester French. The Flatiron Building, originally known as the Fuller Building, is a landmark Manhattan skyscraper designed by Daniel Burnham Frederick Dinkelberg.

The news was released following the grand opening of a new LEGO® Brand Store adjacent to the Flatiron.

More images of the new LEGO® sets, after the break.