T.S.R.Building / Jun’ichi Ito Architect & Associates

© Naoomi Kurozumi

Architects: Jun’ichi Ito Architect & Associates
Location: Minatu-Ku ,
Architect In Charge: Jun’ichi Ito, Naoko Ito
Project Year: 2008
Photographs: Naoomi Kurozumi

G-Flat / architecture WORKSHOP

© Daici Ano

Architects: Koh Kitayama – architecture WORKSHOP
Location: Tokyo, Japan
Design Team: Koh Kitayama, Mariko Hama, Yurie Kobayashi, Hiroko Hasama,
Project Year: 2006
Project Area: 2635.78 sqm
Photographs: Daici Ano

Rest Villa Funabori / Jun’ichi Ito Architect & Associates

© Naoomi Kurozumi

Architects: Jun’ichi Ito Architect & Associates
Location: Edogawa-Ku ,
Architect In Charge: Jun’ichi Ito, Naoko Ito
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Naoomi Kurozumi

Clover House / Toru Kudo + architecture WORKSHOP

© Daici Ano

Architects: + architecture WORKSHOP
Location: , Japan
Design Team: Toru Kudo, KohKitayama, Yukiko Yamamoto
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Daici Ano

KDR House / I.R.A.

© Nobuaki Nakagawa

Architects: International Royal Architecture
Location: ,
Design Team: Akinori Kasegai, Daisuke Tsunakawa, Seo Jung Hwan
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Nobuaki Nakagawa

Yutenji Apartments / architecture WORKSHOP

© Daici Ano

Architects: architecture WORKSHOP
Location: , Japan
Design Team: Koh Kitayama, Hiroko Hasama, Mariko Hama, Kim Young Woo, Shimpei Yamashita
Project Year: 2010
Photographs: Daici Ano

Edogawa Garage Club Renovation / Jun’ichi Ito Architect & Associates

© Naoomi Kurozu

Architects: Jun’ichi Ito Architect & Associates
Location: Edogawa, ,
Project Year: 2009
Photographs: Naoomi Kurozu

Koloro Exhibition / Torafu Architects

© Akihiro Ito

The Koloro Exhibition by Torafu Architects features their complete range of ‘koloro-desk / koloro-stool’, including versions which they collaborated with Mina Perhonen. Shown in CLASKA Gallery and Shop “DO” in , the name ‘koloro’ is an Esperanto word, meaning color, many colors are used at the exhibition. They also display many colorful “airvase” throughout the space, including a new version where we collaborated with photographer Mikiya Takimoto, and a special version of“airvase”, which is enough large to cover your whole body, floating up and down with the help of a motor. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Tokyo Fashion Museum Proposal / MUS Architects

Courtesy of

Designed by MUS Architects, their proposal for the Fashion Museum was recently named the winner of the World Architecture Awards 20+10+X. The whole structure of the building, from the entry yard to the top of the tower has been wound with a homogenic lether relating to the basic fabric of every fashion designer and constituting the base of every collection. Fibers of the fashion museum are lead in two rows – one layer of fiber winds around the building clockwise, the other one counter-closkwise thus resulting in a kind of a plaiting. Due to the small dimensions of the parcel being located in the intensely urbanized city tissue of Tokyo, the wide program of the fashion museum has been set up vertically on 22 levels (19 of which above the ground level). The result is a functional ‘pile’ of layers – ‘program squares’. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Cronnus / Doyle Collection

© Satoru Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners

Architects: Doyle Collection
Location: , Japan
Architect In Charge: Aiji Inoue, Yuki Kanai
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Satoru Umetsu/ Nacasa&Partners

House in Takadanobaba / Florian Busch Architects

© Hiroyasu Sakaguchi

Architects: Florian Busch Architects
Location: , Japan
Design Team: Florian Busch, Sachiko Miyazaki, Momoyo Yamawaki
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Hiroyasu Sakaguchi, Courtesy of Florian Busch Architects

Karakida Community Center / Chiaki Arai Urban and Architecture Design

© Taisuke Ogawa

Architects: Chiaki Arai Urban and Architecture Design
Location: Tama city, , Japan
Architect In Charge: Chiaki Arai
Design Team: Chiaki Arai, Ryoichi Yoshizaki, Tomonori Niimi, Chiaki Hamamatsu
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Taisuke Ogawa

HouseT / Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects

© Hiroyasu Sakaguchi

Architects: Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects
Location: Tokyo,
Structure Engineer: Tatsumi Terado Structural Studio
Contractor: Sinei Ltd
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Hiroyasu Sakaguchi

Video: TOKYO SKYTREE® / Nikken Sekkei

This short video via ja+u takes you on a brief journey through the Tokyo Skytree’s various observation decks that range in altitude from 340m all the way up to the 450m high spiral Tembo Galleria. A quick time lapse of the construction that took place from 2008-2012 illustrates the tower’s growth as it quickly surpassed the Tower’s 333m pinnacle.  See our previous coverage here.

HouseK / Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects

© Kai Nakamura

Architects: Hiroyuki Shinozaki Architects
Location: , Japan
Structure Engineer: Tatsumi Terado Structural Studio
Contractor: Sinei Ltd
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Kai Nakamura

Video: Storage House / Ryuji Fujimura

This short clip via ja+u of the Storage House by Ryuji Fukimura Architects takes you on a quick journey through the relatively compact residence that occupies a thin plot of land in the Kanagawa Prefecture, part of the Greater Area. Smartly designed to maximize the interior volumes, a unique aspect of the house is the dry moats that line the basement floor allowing for diffuse daylight to shower the interior that would have otherwise been artificially lighted.  An added benefit of the moats is that it encourages air circulation from the bottom of the house to the top creating a stack effect.

Video: Asakusa Culture Tourist Information Center / Kengo Kuma

Located in front of the Kamiari-mon gate in Asakusa, Kengo Kuma’s Culture Tourist Information Center serves as a beacon to the local area as well as housing programs to serve both tourists and the local community. This video via ja+u  takes you through the 7 stacked volumes that make up the 8 internal floors that house a wide variety of programming ranging from meeting rooms to tourist information kiosks. The construction uniquely integrates HVAC equipment in the gaps between the stacked volumes. The interior structure of heavy timber members are left exposed which complement the dynamism of the vertical volumes, while the language of wood is continued onto the exterior by means of laminated timber louvers.

OMA reimagines retail for Coach’s new stores

Coach Omotesando Conceptual ©

American retailer Coach has commissioned OMA to develop a new merchandising system that accommodates Coach’s wide diversity of products while returning to the clarity of Coach’s heritage stores. Since establishing its first workshop 1941, Coach has expanded from a specialist leather atelier to a global distributor of “democratized luxury goods”. This expansion has clouded the clarity of the brand’s original library-like stores, which used a rigorous organizational system that categorically sort projects inside minimal wooden shelving at assisted counters. OMA intends to create a flexible, modular system that embodies the clarity of the original stores and responds to the individual needs of locale.

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