ArchDaily | Broadcasting Architecture Worldwidethe world's most visited architecture website

In the Loop / Takuma Sugi + Nanako Hirai + Ben Nitta

22:00 - 12 April, 2016
In the Loop  / Takuma Sugi  + Nanako Hirai  + Ben Nitta, © Keiko Kuramoto
© Keiko Kuramoto

© Keiko Kuramoto © Keiko Kuramoto © Keiko Kuramoto © Keiko Kuramoto +24

Tokyo Pop Lab Honorable Mention Layers Boxes in a 3D Visualization of Pop Culture

16:00 - 2 April, 2016
Tokyo Pop Lab Honorable Mention Layers Boxes in a 3D Visualization of Pop Culture, Courtesy of Tomas Vlasak
Courtesy of Tomas Vlasak

The team of Peter Bus, Tomas Vlasak, Vaclav Petrus, and Petr Bouril has received an honorable mention for their proposal for the Tokyo Pop Lab Competition, which recently announced its winners. The proposal, entitled "At The Crossroads of Ideas," is designed as a “three-dimensional representation of history and development of pop culture.”

Separated into three parts, one below ground, one above ground, and one in-between, the design is interconnected via cylindrical concrete towers, which act as the main structural support of the building.

SO/AP Architectes Reveals Tokyo Pop Lab Proposal

08:00 - 19 March, 2016
SO/AP Architectes Reveals Tokyo Pop Lab Proposal , Courtesy of SO/AP Architectes
Courtesy of SO/AP Architectes

SO/AP Architectes has released its proposal for the Tokyo Pop Lab competition, which recently announced its winners. Based on the duality of environmental vulnerability and the omnipresence of numeric technology, the 3,500 square meter design focuses on the battle between mankind and nature.

Three Winners Announced for Tokyo Pop Lab Competition

17:00 - 12 March, 2016
Three Winners Announced for Tokyo Pop Lab Competition, First Prize: The team of Attilio De Palma, Andrea Longo, and Enrico Nicli, of Italy. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders
First Prize: The team of Attilio De Palma, Andrea Longo, and Enrico Nicli, of Italy. Image Courtesy of Bee Breeders

The three winners of the Tokyo Pop Lab competition, which called for the development of an institution for popular culture, have been announced.

Centered on the phenomena of pop culture, the competition examined how “popular culture migrates and changes from person to person and place to place,” and invited entrants “to critically evaluate fundamental correlations between cultural production and architecture.”

Entrants varied in typology from pragmatic to ideological, with successful proposals including “a well considered and articulated definition of popular culture, clarity in representation of both architecture and culture, and a clear programmatic agenda.”

The three winners of the Tokyo Pop Lab competition are:

Opera / Taka Shinomoto + Voar Design Haus

19:00 - 19 February, 2016
Opera / Taka Shinomoto + Voar Design Haus, © Kenta Hasegawa
© Kenta Hasegawa

© Kenta Hasegawa © Kenta Hasegawa © Kenta Hasegawa © Kenta Hasegawa +23

Nerima House / Elding Oscarson

21:00 - 31 January, 2016
Nerima House / Elding Oscarson, © Kenichi Suzuki 
© Kenichi Suzuki 

© Kenichi Suzuki  © Kenichi Suzuki  © Kenichi Suzuki  © Kenichi Suzuki  +32

  • Architects

  • Location

    Tokyo, Japan
  • Partners in Charge

    Jonas Elding, Johan Oscarson
  • Project Architect

    Yuko Maki
  • Area

    99.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

Kohn Pedersen Fox + Leslie E. Robertson's Next Tokyo 2045 Masterplan Features a Mile-High Skyscraper

06:00 - 29 January, 2016
Kohn Pedersen Fox + Leslie E. Robertson's Next Tokyo 2045 Masterplan Features a Mile-High Skyscraper , Courtesy of Kohn Pederson Fox Associates
Courtesy of Kohn Pederson Fox Associates

Kohn Pedersen Fox Associates and Leslie E. Robertson Associates have joined forces to propose a vision for a new city in Tokyo Bay. “Next Tokyo” imagines a mega-city that is adapted to climate change in the year 2045. Rising sea levels, seismic activity, and the threat of typhoons have drawn attention to the vulnerability of low-elevation coastal zones in the bay. This design proposes a development strategy that improves the bay’s preparedness for these natural disasters, while also creating a mile-high residential tower and a new transit-oriented district.

SM Nursery / HIBINOSEKKEI + Youji no Shiro

20:00 - 25 January, 2016
© Studio Bauhaus
© Studio Bauhaus

© Studio Bauhaus © Studio Bauhaus © Studio Bauhaus © Studio Bauhaus +15

Gakugeidaigaku / Yuichi Yoshida & associates

19:00 - 21 January, 2016
Gakugeidaigaku / Yuichi Yoshida & associates, © Kenta Hasegawa
© Kenta Hasegawa

© Kenta Hasegawa © Kenta Hasegawa © Kenta Hasegawa © Kenta Hasegawa +14

Tsunyuji / Satoru Hirota Architects

17:00 - 19 January, 2016
Tsunyuji / Satoru Hirota Architects, Courtesy of Satoru Hirota Architects
Courtesy of Satoru Hirota Architects

Courtesy of Satoru Hirota Architects Courtesy of Satoru Hirota Architects Courtesy of Satoru Hirota Architects Courtesy of Satoru Hirota Architects +35

  • Architects

  • Location

    Tokyo, Japan
  • Architect in Charge

    Satoru Hirota, Yasuko Hirota
  • Area

    134.0 sqm
  • Photographs

    Courtesy of Satoru Hirota Architects

Kengo Kuma Denies Copying Zaha Hadid's Tokyo National Stadium Design

12:00 - 19 January, 2016
Kengo Kuma Denies Copying Zaha Hadid's Tokyo National Stadium Design, Kengo Kuma's design. Image © Japan Sport Council
Kengo Kuma's design. Image © Japan Sport Council

In the latest Tokyo National Stadium news, Kengo Kuma is firing back to Zaha Hadid's allegations regarding the "similarities" of the two designs by insisting that his "concept is completely different." As reported the Architects' Journal, the Japanese architect agrees there are some natural similarities due to appropriate sightlines and regulations, however the actual design and concept are radically different.

"I believe that the design by Zaha Hadid was excellent, with a unique shape and demonstration of her philosophy," said Kuma in a press conference. "When we consider the design is being created within the same land, using the same tracks and under the same laws it is natural and almost automatic that there are some similarities which will arise."

"And despite the technical details being similar, the concepts and designs are completely different," he added, referring to Hadid's "saddle-style" design and his flat-roofed proposal. 

JSC Witholds Payment from Zaha Hadid in Exchange for Copyright Release

11:55 - 14 January, 2016
JSC Witholds Payment from Zaha Hadid in Exchange for Copyright Release, Zaha Hadid's design. Image © Japan Sport Council
Zaha Hadid's design. Image © Japan Sport Council

Zaha Hadid is facing new hurdles regarding her scrapped Tokyo National Stadium design; according to the architect, the Japan Sport Council (JSC) is withholding an overdue payment until ZHA agrees to relinquish ownership of their original designs. 

After working on the design for more than two years, the British practice was decommissioned from the project over cost objections last summer. Since, Japanese architect Kengo Kuma has been reassigned the project, offering a design that ZHA says is suspiciously similar to their original proposal "in the structure, layout and numerous elements."

Now, the JSC has requested ZHA agrees to new "Compliance Rules" that would allow the stadium's new architect to "use any product of work ... regardless of its copyright."

AD Classics: Nomadic Museum / Shigeru Ban Architects

08:00 - 3 January, 2016
Nomadic Museum, Santa Monica. Image © flickr user paolomazzoleni, licensed under CC BY 2.0
Nomadic Museum, Santa Monica. Image © flickr user paolomazzoleni, licensed under CC BY 2.0

Shigeru Ban, the 2014 Pritzker Prize winner, is an architect often celebrated for his humanitarian and disaster relief structures, constructed out of recycled or recyclable materials. On the other end of spectrum, he is well-known for his meticulously constructed residential and museum projects, more often than not for high-end wealthy clients. The Nomadic Museum, however, combines both of these facets of his practice, using shipping containers and paper tubes to craft a bespoke mobile gallery for Gregory Colbert’s traveling exhibition of photography entitled Ashes and Snow.

© flickr user paolomazzoleni, licensed under CC BY 2.0 Nomadic Museum, New York. Image © flickr user informedmindstravel, licensed under CC BY-NC-ND Nomadic Museum, Santa Monica. Image © flickr user paolomazzoleni, licensed under CC BY 2.0 Section, Santa Monica +10

Kengo Kuma Selected to Design New Tokyo National Stadium

08:01 - 22 December, 2015
Kengo Kuma Selected to Design New Tokyo National Stadium, © Japan Sport Council via Curbed
© Japan Sport Council via Curbed

Kengo Kuma & Associates have been selected to replace Zaha Hadid Architects to design the new Tokyo National Stadium, the central venue for the 2020 Tokyo Olympics. Kuma's design was revealed alongside one other, a design by Toyo Ito, last week, after the original design by Zaha Hadid Architects was scrapped earlier this year. As reported by The Japan TimesKuma's design narrowly won out against Ito's based on nine selection criteria by the Japan Sport Council, being awarded 610 total points compared to Ito's 602. Responding to concerns about the size and cost of Hadid's design, the new design will be under 50 meters tall and cost an estimated ¥153 billion, compared with the 70 meters and ¥252 billion of Hadid's controversial plans.

Dental Clinic with Coved Ceiling / Hiroki Tominaga

17:00 - 19 November, 2015
Dental Clinic with Coved Ceiling / Hiroki Tominaga, © Takumi Ota
© Takumi Ota

© Takumi Ota © Takumi Ota © Takumi Ota © Takumi Ota +8

Tokyo Station Yaesu Redevelopment / JAHN

20:00 - 11 November, 2015
Tokyo Station Yaesu Redevelopment / JAHN, © Rainer Viertlbock
© Rainer Viertlbock

© Rainer Viertlbock © Rainer Viertlbock © Rainer Viertlbock © Rainer Viertlbock +13

Can Anyone Win in Architecture Criticism? An Appeal for a "New Sincerity"

09:30 - 9 November, 2015
Can Anyone Win in Architecture Criticism? An Appeal for a "New Sincerity"

In the mid-1980s, after literature had long been held hostage by postmodernist irony and cynicism, a new wave of authors called for an end to negativity, promoting a "new sincerity" for fiction. Gaining momentum into the 1990s, the movement reached a pinnacle in 1993 when, in his essay E Unibus Pluram: Television and U.S. Fiction, pop-culture seer David Foster Wallace, a proponent of this "new sincerity," made the following call to action: “The next real literary ‘rebels’ in this country might well emerge as some weird bunch of anti-rebels, born oglers who dare somehow to back away from ironic watching, who have the childish gall actually to endorse and instantiate single-entendre principles... These anti-rebels would be outdated, of course, before they even started. Dead on the page. Too sincere. Clearly repressed. Backward, quaint, naive, anachronistic. Maybe that’ll be the point. Maybe that’s why they’ll be the next real rebels. Real rebels, as far as I can see, risk disapproval. The old postmodern insurgents risked the gasp and squeal: shock, disgust, outrage, censorship, accusations of socialism, anarchism, nihilism. Today’s risks are different. The new rebels might be artists willing to risk the yawn, the rolled eyes, the cool smile, the nudged ribs, the parody of gifted ironists, the ‘Oh how banal.'"

Architecture, ever in debt to the styles and ideas of other art forms, could learn a thing or two now from the resuscitation of American fiction at the turn of the millennium. It too is enduring an identity crisis, mired by pessimism and uncertainty - a reality made painfully clear this past January when a New York Times Op-Ed by Steven Bingler and Martin C. Pedersen, How to Rebuild Architecture, divided camps and made the design world fume. In the editorial, the authors spoke vehemently of an architectural profession that has become mired by egos and been disconnected from public needs. Things quickly got ugly, critics wrestled with critics and subsequently the public got involved. What no one seemed to take into account is that this type of hounding is at the core of the problem. In its current landscape the discipline has struggled with its past, been deferential to its present, and wrestled with the uncertainty of its future. In a moment when we have become addicted to despondency, can anyone win?

Small House with Floating Treehouse / Yuki Miyamoto Architect

02:00 - 8 November, 2015
Small House with Floating Treehouse / Yuki Miyamoto Architect, © Masayoshi Ishii
© Masayoshi Ishii

© Masayoshi Ishii © Masayoshi Ishii © Masayoshi Ishii © Masayoshi Ishii +20