Fusing Architecture and Music: Philip Kennicott On the Inspiration Behind Steven Holl’s Daeyang Gallery and House for Dwell

A watercolor by architect Steven Holl was an early step toward translating an obscure musical score by István Anhalt into a new home and gallery in Seoul, © Iwan Baan

Awarded yesterday with the 2013 Pulitzer Prize for criticism, Philip Kennicott has built an honorable reputation as a art and architecture critic for Washington Post’s Style section. One of his most recent works, Music Holl: A Copper Clad Pavilion - exclusively published in Dwell’s May Issue Global Style - recounts the inspiration behind Steven Holl’s award-winning Daeyang Gallery and House in Seoul. 

Designed as an experiment on “the architectonics of music,” the basic geometry of the Daeyang Gallery and House was inspired by Istvan Anhalt’s 1967 ‘Symphony of Modules’ – a uniquely transcribed sheet of music found in John Cage’s contemporary music compendium, Notations. Reminiscent of the “blocky and shard-like shapes” of Anhalt’s sketch, Holl’s design features three copper-clad pavilions punctured by a symphony of carefully placed, rectangular skylights that animate the interior with “bars of light”. As Kennicott describes, Holl uses music as a “powerful metaphor for the dynamic unfolding of experience” (captured in this film by Spirit of Space).

Read Kennicott’s Music Holl: A Copper Clad Pavilion in its entirety here on Dwell. Continue after the break to compare Steven Holl’s Daeyang sketch above with Anhalt’s ‘Symphony of Modules’.

Mookdong Multi Housing / Moon Hoon

© Moon Jeongsik

Architects: Moon Hoon
Location: , Korea
Architect In Charge:
Design Team: Kim Suki, Park Seonhu
Area: 117 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Moon Jeongsik

Sejong Art Center Winning Proposal / DMP Partners

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Designed by DMP Partners, their winning proposal for the Sejong Art Center (SAC) is composed of two theaters, a main theater with more than 800 seats, a medium sized theater with 300 seats, a film theater with 250 seats, and an art gallery. Located in the international cultural area between nature-scape and urban-scape, the building combines nature and city through its straight, linear shape. This form is applied in accordance with the city and its curvature shape is in accordance with nature to create a comfortable feeling. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Performing Arts Studio of the National Theatre of Korea Second Prize Winning Proposal / Archiplan

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Designed by Archiplan, their second prize winning proposal for the Performing Arts Studio of the National Theatre of Korea is an extension design concept for the performers practice facilities in the basement of the existing plaza. The main issue is the vitalization of the environment which is now ‘blocked’ by the retaining wall on the edge of the main road and by the steep slope that makes a disconnection of the site. By embracing art, culture, and the city itself, this proposal connects the two-dimensional old theatre-plaza and the nearby park to link the performer and the citizens while allowing the art and culture flow well. More images and architects’ description after the break.

P&P / Yeonghwan Lim + Sunhyun Kim

© Youngchae Park

Architects: Yeonghwan Lim + Sunhyun Kim
Location: , Korea
Architect In Charge: Young Lim + Sun Kim
Area: 467.55 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Youngchae Park

Films & Architecture: “Cloud Atlas”

Courtesy of Warner Bros. Pictures

Cloud Altas is the adaptation of David Mitchell’s novel by the same name. It follows six different story-lines, each taking place in a different time period, ranging over hundreds of years (from our past to future). Each era gets a careful development of space, and, as usual, the show their unique way of imagining the city of the future.

In fact, the story lines were filmed separately: while Tom Tykwer was working on those stories that take place in the 1930′s and 1970′s, the Watchowski Brothers were filming all the futuristic ones (which take place in the year 2321). Several famous buildings were utilised - let us know if you recognise any of them. Enjoy and as always, comment!

Neil Barrett ‘Shop in Shop’ / Zaha Hadid Architects

© Virgile Simon Bertrand

Designed by Zaha Hadid Architects, the ‘Shop in Shop’ concept for Neil Barrett is based on a singular, cohesive project that is divided into sixteen separate pieces. Specific pieces have then been selected and installed into each of the four Neil Barrett Shop in Shop’s in , and also into the shop; creating a unique display landscape within each store. The pieces have been carved and molded from the original solid as pairs that define each other to create an artificial landscape that unfolds multiple layers for display. More images and architects’ description after the break.

Choonwondang Oriental Clinic & Museum / Doojin Hwang Architects

© Youngchae Park

Architects: Doojin Hwang Architects
Location: , Korea
Design Team: Hajeong Lim, Soohyun Kim, Sun Hur, Euijin Park
Area: 1882.52 sqm
Year: 2009
Photographs: Youngchae Park

The Bricks / Doojin Hwang Architects

© Youngchae Park

Architects: Doojin Hwang Architects
Design Team: Euijin Park
Location: Seoul,
Contractor: Janghak Construction
Structure Engineer: Samjung EMC
Mechanical Engineer: Bowoo Technology Corporation
Electric Design: Shinhan Eletric Engineering
Civil Engineer: GeoTech Engineering & Consultants
Photographs: Youngchae Park, 

Songwon Art Center / Mass Studies

© Kyungsub Shin

Architects: Mass Studies
Location: , Korea
Architect In Charge: Minsuk Cho, Kisu Park
Design Team: Zongxoo U, Yoonhwan Kim, Youngjoon Chung, Joungwon Lee, Daeun Jeong, Hyunjung Kim, Sanghoon Lee, Songmin Lee
Area: 841.51 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Kyungsub Shin

The West Village / Doojin Hwang Architects

© Youngchae Park

Architects: Doojin Hwang Architects
Location: Seoul,
Architect In Charge: Doojin Hwang
Design Team: Jeongyoon Choi
Area: 209.83 sqm
Year: 2011
Photographs: Youngchae Park

H-House / BANG by MIN – Sae Min Oh

© Joonhwan Yoon

Architects:
Location: Seongbuk-dong, Seongbuk-gu, , South Korea
Architect In Charge: Sae Min Oh
Design Team: Changwook Kwak, Hyunduck Yoo
Area: 403.56 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Joonhwan Yoon

My Boon / Jaklitsch – Gardner Architects PC

© Nacasa & Partners

Architects: Jaklitsch – Gardner Architects PC
Location: ,
Design Team: Stephan Jaklitsch, Mark Gardner, Christopher Kitterman, Mariana Renjifo, Bjarke Ballisager, Margaux Schindler, Liz Kelsey
Architect: Kukbo Design
Collaborator: Milan Vukmirovic
Area: 622 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Nacasa & Partners

Swiss Embassy Competition Entry / Personeni Raffaele Schärer Architects

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Located in the Seodaemu-gu district of , the Swiss Embassy proposal by Personeni Raffaele Schärer Architects stands as a pavilion sitting on four mushroom columns. Reaching the maximum authorized height, the project becomes part of the makeover that the neighborhood is about to undergo with its global and drastic transformations. The end result is a tree house like structure floating over a canopy of dense trees in an extremely urban context. More images and architects’ description after the break.

HouseWING / AnLstudio + Heebon

© Sunghwan Yoon

Architects: AnLstudio, Heebon
Location: Jongro, Seoul,
Design Team: Keehyun Ahn, Minsoo Lee, and Yongseok Kwon
Project Year: 2012
Photographs: Sunghwan Yoon

Hyundai Advances Design Studion / Delugan Meissl Associated Architects

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Architects: Delugan Meissl Associated Architects
Location: Seoul,
Design Team: Sebastian Brunke, Alejandro C. Carrera, Sabrina Miletich
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Courtesy of Delugan Meissl Associated Architects

Poroscape / Younghan Chung + Studio Archiholic

© Kim Jae kyeong

Architects: +
Location: Jongrogu, Seoul, Korea
Architect In Charge: Younghan Chung
Project Year: 2011
Project Area: 191.12 sqm
Photographs: Kim Jae kyeong, Park Jong min

Miega / BANG by MIN-Sae Min Oh

© Jungwoo Choi

Architects: BANG by MIN (Sae Min Oh)
Location: Seongbuk-dong, Seongbuk-gu, , Korea
Design Team: Changwook Kwak, Hyunduck Yoo
Project Year: 2012
Project Area: 124.81 sqm
Photographs: Jungwoo Choi, Jaeyoon Kim