AD Classics: Nomadic Museum / Shigeru Ban Architects

08:00 - 3 January, 2016
Nomadic Museum, Santa Monica. Image © flickr user paolomazzoleni, licensed under CC BY 2.0
Nomadic Museum, Santa Monica. Image © flickr user paolomazzoleni, licensed under CC BY 2.0

Shigeru Ban, the 2014 Pritzker Prize winner, is an architect often celebrated for his humanitarian and disaster relief structures, constructed out of recycled or recyclable materials. On the other end of spectrum, he is well-known for his meticulously constructed residential and museum projects, more often than not for high-end wealthy clients. The Nomadic Museum, however, combines both of these facets of his practice, using shipping containers and paper tubes to craft a bespoke mobile gallery for Gregory Colbert’s traveling exhibition of photography entitled Ashes and Snow.

© flickr user paolomazzoleni, licensed under CC BY 2.0 Nomadic Museum, New York. Image © flickr user informedmindstravel, licensed under CC BY-NC-ND Nomadic Museum, Santa Monica. Image © flickr user paolomazzoleni, licensed under CC BY 2.0 Section, Santa Monica +10

Gensler to Renovate Ford Foundation's New York Headquarters

14:00 - 30 December, 2015
Gensler to Renovate Ford Foundation's New York Headquarters, The Ford Foundation / Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo and Associates. Image © Ezra Stoller/Esto
The Ford Foundation / Kevin Roche John Dinkeloo and Associates. Image © Ezra Stoller/Esto

The Ford Foundation is about to undergo a massive $190 million renovation. Led by Gensler, the project will "modernize" the landmark building and expand its spaces "for convening and creating a global center for philanthropy and civil society."

Originally designed by Kevin Roche and John Dinkeloo, the Ford Foundation is considered to be one of modern architecture's most iconic buildings. "That rarity, a building aware of its world," New York Times architecture critic Ada Louise Huxtable once described, following the building's opening in 1967. 

Arch From the Syrian Temple of Bel to be Replicated in London and New York City

04:00 - 30 December, 2015
Rendering of the arch's position in Trafalgar Square, London. Image © IDA
Rendering of the arch's position in Trafalgar Square, London. Image © IDA

The Institute for Digital Archaeology (IDA), a joint-venture between Harvard University (US), the University of Oxford (UK) and Dubai’s Museum of the Future (UAE) have announced that they will replicate a structure of architectural significance that was destroyed earlier this year by IS, or 'Islamic State', at full scale in the centre of London and New York City. The arch—all that remains of the Temple of Bel at the Syrian UNESCO World Heritage site—was captured by militants in May and destroyed. By no means an isolated case, IS have looted and demolished a number of similar architectural and anthropologically important sites that "pre-date Islam in Iraq," condemning them as "symbols of idolatry."

COOKFOX Wins Preservation Approval for Manhattan Condominium

14:00 - 28 December, 2015
COOKFOX Wins Preservation Approval for Manhattan Condominium, South. Image © COOKFOX Architects
South. Image © COOKFOX Architects

The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission has approved COOKFOX Architect's plans for a mid-rise, 66-unit condominium building in Manhattan. Planned for two parcels of land in the West End Collegiate Historic District, next to one of the Churches' five ministries, the project aims to "fit harmoniously with the distinct streetscape" while "interweaving the rich historic details of the Upper West Side with subtle contemporary and sustainable design."

Isay Weinfeld Unveils the Design for His First Project in New York City

06:00 - 28 December, 2015
Isay Weinfeld Unveils the Design for His First Project in New York City, Exterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of VUW Studio
Exterior Rendered View. Image Courtesy of VUW Studio

Located on 527 West 27th Street, in “the heart of West Chelsea” and overlooking the highline, Jardim is a set of two, 11-storey luxury condominium buildings designed by Brazilian architect Isay Weinfeld. His first project in New York, the buildings comprise 36 condominium residences, each with between 1-4 bedrooms. Many of the residences will have private outdoor spaces, providing “seamless indoor-outdoor living."

Good Public Art in Bad Public Spaces: Art Critic Jerry Saltz Takes on the Built Environment

14:00 - 27 December, 2015
Good Public Art in Bad Public Spaces: Art Critic Jerry Saltz Takes on the Built Environment, Deborah Kass' sculpture "OY/YO" under the Manhattan Bridge. Image © Flickr user DUMBOBID, licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0
Deborah Kass' sculpture "OY/YO" under the Manhattan Bridge. Image © Flickr user DUMBOBID, licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

In his latest article for Vulture, art critic Jerry Saltz celebrates the latest crop of public art in New York City, such as Deborah Kass' OY/YO sculpture, sitting near the Manhattan Bridge in Brooklyn, commenting on the success of such pieces even though (or perhaps because) many of them have been curated by art-world insiders rather than publicly accountable arts commissions or community engagement processes. But for Saltz, this new wave of high-quality public art has come at the expense of quality public space. Despite his admiration for the art installations, he expresses skepticism of the privately-funded public spaces that house them, such as the much-celebrated High Line, designed by Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS+R) and James Corner Field Operations, as well as future projects such as Pier 55 by Heatherwick Studio, and the "Culture Shed" at the Hudson Yards development also by DS+R. His critique even references a phrase from DS+R that belongs on our list of words only architects use. Read Saltz's full discussion of public art and public space here.

21st Century New York: What Would Jane Jacobs Do?

16:00 - 26 December, 2015
21st Century New York: What Would Jane Jacobs Do?, What would Jane Jacobs have thought of the Barclays Center, designed by SHoP Architects, part of the Atlantic Yards development in Brooklyn. Image © Flickr user otto-yamamoto, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0, via Commons
What would Jane Jacobs have thought of the Barclays Center, designed by SHoP Architects, part of the Atlantic Yards development in Brooklyn. Image © Flickr user otto-yamamoto, licensed under CC BY-SA 2.0, via Commons

It has been over fifty years since Jane Jacobs' book, The Death and Life of Great American Cities, revolutionized discourse on urban planning, and her words still carry a huge influence today. But in the intervening decades New York City has changed in ways Jacobs could never have imagined when she was writing in the 1960s. In a recent article for City Journal, Judith Miller tries to imagine how Jane Jacobs would have responded to some of New York City's recent projects - taking as examples the imminent domain actions and tax breaks that made Brooklyn's Atlantic Yards (now also known as Pacific Park) possible, the cluster of skyscrapers and public venues planned for Hudson Yards on the west side of Manhattan, and the supertall luxury condo towers that are beginning to cast their long shadows over Central Park. Read Miller's article in full here.

The Landscape Architecture Behind the Lowline

08:00 - 17 December, 2015
The Landscape Architecture Behind the Lowline, Courtesy of the Lowline
Courtesy of the Lowline

In 2013 New York City ranked 14th among high density cities in the United States in parkland per 1,000 residents with only 4.6 acres/1000 residents. With almost 8.5 million people living in New York and more commuting on a daily basis, NYCers are finding it harder and harder to get outside and experience nature. The harsh winter and constant demand for growth and construction only make this more challenging.

In recent years New York has become famous for an unusual method of bringing green space to the city, the hugely popular “High Line” which reused industrial infrastructure in the creation of a new park. But as unconventional as the High Line is, it’s nothing compared to James Ramsey's of Raad Studio  and Dan Barasch’s state-of-the-art proposed counterpart, the subterranean “Lowline." Working alongside others including  Signe Nielsen, principal at Matthew Nielsen Landscape Architects, and John Mini, the pair recently opened the Lowline Lab, an environment similar to that of the actual Lowline site that gives the team a space to put their theories and ideas to the test, gather results and make final decisions. I had a chance to catch up with Ramsey and Nielsen to discuss the landscape of their test space.

Courtesy of the Lowline Courtesy of Jaeyual Lee at Raad studio Courtesy of Jaeyual Lee at Raad studio Courtesy of the Lowline +29

Mark Foster Gage's Manhattan Skyscraper Takes Gothic Architecture to New Heights

13:30 - 15 December, 2015
Mark Foster Gage's Manhattan Skyscraper Takes Gothic Architecture to New Heights, © Mark Foster Gage Architects
© Mark Foster Gage Architects

This isn't your typical New York skyscraper; Mark Foster Gage has been commissioned to design a 1492-foot-tall luxury tower in Manhattan - 41 West 57th Street. Described by Skyscraper City as the "missing link between Beaux Arts, Art Deco, Expressionism, Gaudi-Modernisme and Contemporary architecture," the outlandish design boasts a uniquely carved facade cloaked in balconies custom tailored for each of its 91 residential units. 

"I think that many of the supertall buildings being built in New York City are virtually free of architectural design - they are just tall boxes covered in a selected glass curtain wall products. That is not design," said Gage. 

New LEGO® Collection Lets You Recreate Skylines

12:00 - 11 December, 2015
New York City. Image © LEGO®
New York City. Image © LEGO®

Venice, Berlin and New York City are the first to be featured in LEGO®'s new Architecture Skyline Collection. Unlike its single-building series, these new kits will allow you to recreate famous skylines by constructing up to 5 of each city's most iconic buildings. 

New York City's skyline will be represented by the One World Trade Center, Empire State Building, Chrysler Building, Statue of Liberty, and Flatiron Building. Venice will feature the Rialto Bridge, St. Mark’s Basilica, St. Mark’s Campanile, St. Theodore and the Winged Lion of St. Mark, and the Bridge of Sighs. And Berlin's skyline will include the Reichstag, Victory Column, Deutsche Bahn Tower, Berlin TV Tower, and Brandenburg Gate.

Heatherwick and Diamond Schmitt to Reimagine Lincoln Center's Largest Concert Hall

11:30 - 11 December, 2015
Heatherwick and Diamond Schmitt to Reimagine Lincoln Center's Largest Concert Hall, David Geffen Hall. Image © WPPilot licensed under CC BY 4.0
David Geffen Hall. Image © WPPilot licensed under CC BY 4.0

Heatherwick Studio and Diamond Schmitt Architects have been chosen to collaborate on the "renovation and reimagination" of David Geffen Hall, Lincoln Center’s largest concert hall in New York City. The team, chosen through a two-year competition and over 100 firms, will design a 21st-century concert hall for the New York Philharmonic home and transform it into a center capable of hosting "a broader, ongoing array of community activities and events."

"The inspiring combination of Heatherwick and Diamond Schmitt will bring contemporary design excellence, respect for the historic architecture of the hall, and extensive experience creating acoustically superb performance halls," said Katherine Farley, chairman of Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts.

This SOM Archive Video Offers a Look Back at the Early Days of 3D Visualization

09:30 - 10 December, 2015

Until recently, the only options for providing clients and the public with visualizations of what a prospective building would look like were almost exclusively hand drawn renderings, or scale models built by hand. Both of these practices are still in use today, but now there is a much wider range of options with 3D modeling software providing the bulk of renderings, the growing presence of 3D printing, and even video fly-throughs with special effects that rival the latest Hollywood action movie. This 16mm film created by architecture firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (SOM) in 1984, and digitized by illustrator Peter Little, reminded us of what the early days of digital 3D modeling looked like.

Spotlight: Minoru Yamasaki

11:45 - 1 December, 2015
Spotlight: Minoru Yamasaki, World Trade Center. Image © Wikipedia user Jeffmock, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons
World Trade Center. Image © Wikipedia user Jeffmock, licensed under CC BY-SA 3.0 via Commons

Minoru Yamasaki (December 1, 1912 – February 7, 1986) has the uncommon distinction of being most well known for how some of his buildings were destroyed. His twin towers at the World Trade Center in New York collapsed in the terrorist attacks of September 11th, 2001, and his Pruitt-Igoe complex in St. Louis, Missouri, demolished less than 20 years after its completion, came to symbolize the failure of public housing and urban renewal in the United States. But beyond those infamous cases, Yamasaki enjoyed a long and prolific career, and was considered one of the masters of “New Formalism,” infusing modern buildings with classical proportions and sumptuous materials.

Daniel Libeskind on Immigration, New York City, and 'the State of the World'

04:00 - 30 November, 2015
Daniel Libeskind on Immigration, New York City, and 'the State of the World', © Stefan Ruiz
© Stefan Ruiz

In an exclusive interview with Daniel Libeskind, who is based in New York City ("a microcosm of the world") and describes himself as having been "an immigrant several times," discusses his origins, his family, his early influences and the 'state of the world', touching upon a great theme in his built works: that of memorialising and remembrance in the built environment. Having grown up under "terrible oppression" in post-war Poland and moved between countries eighteen times, he describes himself as a citizen of the world with a great deal of retrospective advice for prospective architects.

SOFTLab’s “Nova” Transforms Flatiron Public Plaza for the Holiday Season

08:00 - 25 November, 2015
SOFTLab’s “Nova” Transforms Flatiron Public Plaza for the Holiday Season, Courtesy of Van Alen Institute
Courtesy of Van Alen Institute

The Flatiron Public Plaza has unveiled its centerpiece for this year’s “23 Days of Flatiron Cheer” – SOFTLab’s Nova, the winner of a closed-competition hosted by the Flatiron/23rd Street Partnership Business Improvement District (BID) and Van Alen Institute. The project will become the center of the neighbourhood’s festivities for the holiday season, as well as “a highly visible landmark” in the heart of New York

Courtesy of Van Alen Institute Courtesy of Van Alen Institute Courtesy of 3M Courtesy of Van Alen Institute +16

BIG High Line Project Unveiled

12:15 - 23 November, 2015
BIG High Line Project Unveiled , © BIG, via New York Yimby
© BIG, via New York Yimby

New York Yimby has unveiled BIG's latest New York skyscraper: 76 11th Avenue. Planned for one of the largest plots along the High Line, the nearly 800,000-square-foot proposed project is comprised of two towers perched on a podium of retail, gallery and hotel space in the city's Meatpacking district. Rising 302-feet to the east and 402-feet to the west, the towers are divided by a "diagonal cut" through the site that opens up more views for residents to the High Line.

David Chipperfield Reveals His First Residential Project in New York

12:40 - 20 November, 2015
David Chipperfield Reveals His First Residential Project in New York, © Miller Hare
© Miller Hare

Details on David Chipperfield's first large-scale residential project in New York has been revealed. The last development to take place at Bryant Park, The Bryant condominium tower will feature 57 one to four bedroom residences, including two triplex penthouses, on a boutique hotel at 16 West 40th Street. The HFZ Capital Group development was designed with Chipperfield's "intelligent simplicity," as the architects describe. Each residence will occupy a corner of the tower.

REX to Design World Trade Center Performing Arts Building in New York

11:41 - 20 November, 2015
REX to Design World Trade Center Performing Arts Building in New York, WTC site. Image © James Ewing OTTO
WTC site. Image © James Ewing OTTO

A commission that was originally set to be Frank Gehry's, Brooklyn-based REX has been selected to design The Performing Arts Center at New York's World Trade Center site - PACWTC. REX was chosen over finalists Henning Larsen Architects and UNStudio through a "rigorous invitational process" that focused on the practices' experience with similar projects, including REX's Dee and Chales Wyly Theater in Dallas, Seattle Public Library and Vakko Fashion Center in Istanbul.

"Throughout the architectural selection process, REX presented us with an inspired vision. Joshua [Prince-Ramus] totally blew us away with his innovative ideas about how to present cutting-edge culture, but also about how to make the PAC relate to everyone who comes to the WTC site," said PACWTC director and president Maggie Boepple.