WIRED Looks at 8 Cities of the Future

08:00 - 13 October, 2015
Hovenring, Circular Cycle Bridge / ipv Delft. Image Courtesy of ipv Delft
Hovenring, Circular Cycle Bridge / ipv Delft. Image Courtesy of ipv Delft

WIRED Magazine has created a list of Eight Cities That Will Show You What The Future Will Look Like in the latest edition of their design issue. In the relatively short span of time that humans have been planning cities, more and more decisions have been made that have shaped the path of new technologies and methods that will make cities better. Such projects—like new streetlights, bicycle infrastructure, and traffic-sensitive museums—highlight some of these advances in the urban lifestyle.

"The cities of tomorrow might still self-assemble haltingly, but done right, the process won’t be accidental. A city shouldn’t just happen anymore. Every block, every building, every brick represents innumerable decisions. Decide well, and cities are magic," writes Wired author Adam Rogers. Read on after the break to see how 8 different cities from around the world are implementing innovative projects. 

Casa de la Memoria Museum / Juan David Botero

11:00 - 27 August, 2015
© Isaac Ramírez Marín
© Isaac Ramírez Marín
  • Architects

  • Location

    Medellín, Medellín, Antioquia, Colombia
  • Architect Designs Coordinator

    Juan David Botero
  • Architects Task Force

    Maria Fernanda Vasco O, Carla Cristina Gil, Jorge Adrian Gaviria, Catalina Jaramillo, Daniel Santiago Herrera, Elías José Gomez, Víctor Hugo Rodriguez, Alejandro Naranjo, Oscar Santana
  • Advisory Architect design

    Carlos Mario Rodriguez
  • Area

    21000.0 m2
  • Year

    2011
  • Photography

    Isaac Ramírez Marín

© Isaac Ramírez Marín © Isaac Ramírez Marín © Isaac Ramírez Marín © Isaac Ramírez Marín +32

La Condesa / Plasma Nodo

13:00 - 14 August, 2015
© Daniel Mejía
© Daniel Mejía
  • Designer

  • Location

    Medellín, Medellín, Antioquia, Colombia
  • Design team

    Santiago Bohórquez, Daniel Mejía, Sara Ramírez
  • Area

    100.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

    Daniel Mejía

© Daniel Mejía © Daniel Mejía © Daniel Mejía © Daniel Mejía +10

9 ¾ Bookstore + Café / PLASMA NODO

09:00 - 29 July, 2015
© Daniel Mejía
© Daniel Mejía

© Daniel Mejía © Daniel Mejía © Daniel Mejía © Daniel Mejía +23

How EPM Group Is Reclaiming Medellín's Infrastructure as Public Space

06:00 - 15 June, 2015
UVA Moscú. Image © EPM Group
UVA Moscú. Image © EPM Group

With a high-density population and a history of internal armed conflict, the city of Medellín in Colombia lacked substantial public space, but had an overwhelming amount of industrial infrastructure in place. But as profiled by The Architectural Review, recently architects and urban planners of the EPM group saw this imbalance as an opportunity, and so in the uninhabited patches of land surrounding over one hundred fenced industrial lots, the UVA or Unidades de Vida Articulada (Units of Articulated Life) program was born. Including initiatives to build public classrooms, launderettes and cafés, the UVA projects were conceived together with the local population through a series of workshops, where every resident was invited to express their vision for the new public square through writing and drawing. Medellín, existing at the convergence of several hills, provides a wide variety of unique landscapes for architects to experiment on - and through the UVA projects, EPM Group demonstrates how architecture can empower a community from the first day of design. Read more about how this project will continue to instigate positive change at The Architectural Review.

Plaza de La Libertad Civic Center / OPUS + Toroposada Arquitectos

20:00 - 28 May, 2015
© Sergio Gómez
© Sergio Gómez
  • Architects

  • Location

    Medellín, Antioquia, Colombia
  • Project Area

    61000.0 m2
  • Photographs

    Sergio Gómez

© Sergio Gómez © Sergio Gómez © Sergio Gómez © Sergio Gómez +24

La Enseñanza School Auditorium / OPUS + MEJÍA

13:00 - 26 May, 2015
© Sergio Gómez
© Sergio Gómez
  • Architects

  • Location

    Calle # 18-9, Medellín, Antioquia, Colombia
  • Design Director

    Edgar Mejía Escobar, Manuel Jaén Posada, Carlos Andrés Betancur, Carlos David Montoya
  • Coordinator

    Santiago López Posada
  • Design Team

    Carlos Cano, Juan Sebastián Restrepo, Mario Camargo
  • Area

    2600.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

    Sergio Gómez

© Sergio Gómez © Sergio Gómez © Sergio Gómez © Sergio Gómez +21

Camilo Mora Carrasquilla School / FP Oficina de Arquitectura

01:00 - 20 January, 2015
Courtesy of FP Oficina de Arquitectura
Courtesy of FP Oficina de Arquitectura
  • Architects

  • Location

    Medellín, Antioquia, Colombia
  • Project Architect

    Mauricio Montoya
  • Designers

    José Puentes, Mauricio Montoya
  • Construction

    Consorcio Ménsula Ecco
  • Project Area

    4060.0 m2
  • Project Year

    2014
  • Photographs

    Courtesy of FP Oficina de Arquitectura, Fundación Argos

© Fundación Argos Courtesy of FP Oficina de Arquitectura © Fundación Argos Courtesy of FP Oficina de Arquitectura +27

Ask Arup: How to Build on a Site that is "Pretty Much a Pool"

00:00 - 10 January, 2015
Eco shelter rendering, Refugio Nasua.. Image © fabrica de ideas (Juan Esteban Correa Elejalde and Julián Felipe Villa)
Eco shelter rendering, Refugio Nasua.. Image © fabrica de ideas (Juan Esteban Correa Elejalde and Julián Felipe Villa)

This article originally appeared on Arup Connect as “Ask Arup: Silty Sand Solutions.”

Architect Juan Esteban Correa Elejalde’s client tasked him with designing an off-the-grid getaway for a rural site near Medellín, Colombia. After completing the initial design concept, Correa Elejalde ordered a soil study of the client’s land.

Unfortunately, the results showed the site to be “pretty much a pool,” he said; the high water table and thick layers of loose soil would provide little capacity to support heavy objects above.

After seeing Arup Connect’s call for engineering-related questions on ArchDaily, he reached out to see if we could offer any insight.

Antonio Derka School / Obranegra Arquitectos

01:00 - 28 September, 2014
© Isaac Ramírez
© Isaac Ramírez
  • Architects

  • Location

    Medellín, Antioquia, Colombia
  • Area

    7500.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2008
  • Photographs

    Isaac Ramírez, Sergio Gómez, Alejandro Arango, Alfonso Posada, Carlos Pardo, Luis Adriano Ramírez

© Sergio Gómez © Alejandro Arango © Alfonso Posada © Sergio Gómez +19

Latin America's Top 8 Smart Cities

00:00 - 8 December, 2013
Santiago, Chile took the top spot on the list. Image via Plataforma Urbana
Santiago, Chile took the top spot on the list. Image via Plataforma Urbana

In this article for Fast Company, Boyd Cohen counts down the top 8 smart cities in Latin America. Using publicly available data and his own comprehensive framework to evaluate how smart a city is, he has generated a list which even he admits features a couple of surprises in the top spots. To see the list and discover what each city has achieved to deserve its ranking, you can read the full article here.

The Moravia Kindergarten / Alejandro Restrepo Montoya + Javier Castañeda Acero

01:00 - 29 November, 2013
© Sergio Gómez
© Sergio Gómez
  • Architects

    Alejandro Restrepo Montoya · Office Profile, Javier Castañeda Acero
  • Location

    Carrera 57, Medellín, Antioquia, Colombia
  • Design Team

    Javier Castañeda Acero, Alejandro Restrepo Montoya, Edison Bedoya Santamaría, Juan Esteban Parra Henao, Pablo Rico Álvarez, Jorge Andrés Arenas Betancur, Juan David Cerón Betancur, Zulay Andrea Rendón Cardona
  • Area

    950.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2009
  • Photographs

    Sergio Gómez, Juan Felipe Gómez Tobón

© Sergio Gómez © Sergio Gómez © Sergio Gómez © Sergio Gómez +27

Cities are for People: Turning Underused Spaces into Public Places

00:00 - 1 November, 2013
Metrocable, architect Urban-Think Tank. Image © Omar Uran
Metrocable, architect Urban-Think Tank. Image © Omar Uran

It begins with a fundamental premise: Buildings occupy only a fraction of land in cities. Just as important as physical structures, are the public spaces in between.

In many cities these spaces have long been disregarded. Today, however, we are witnessing bold experimentation and innovation coming forth from cities across the globe: cities re-using and re-imagining previously underused spaces in order to uplift communities and transform lives. 

RV House / Alejandro Restrepo Montoya + Camilo Andrés Mejía Bravo + Andrés Felipe Mesa Trujillo

01:00 - 26 September, 2013
Courtesy of Alejandro Restrepo Montoya
Courtesy of Alejandro Restrepo Montoya
  • Architects

    Alejandro Restrepo Montoya · Office Profile, Camilo Andrés Mejía Bravo, Andrés Felipe Mesa Trujillo
  • Location

    Medellín, Antioquia, Colombia
  • Design Team

    Álvaro Mauricio López Gómez, Juan Camilo Garcés Cuesta
  • Area

    415.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2010
  • Photographs

    Courtesy of Alejandro Restrepo Montoya, Sergio Gómez

© Sergio Gómez © Sergio Gómez © Sergio Gómez © Sergio Gómez +27

AD Interviews Eduardo Souto de Moura On His Latest Prize

01:00 - 26 September, 2013
Prtizker laureate Eduardo Souto de Moura accepts the Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design at a ceremony held at the Harvard Graduate School of Design in September. Image © Yusuke Suzuki for Harvard GSD Events
Prtizker laureate Eduardo Souto de Moura accepts the Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design at a ceremony held at the Harvard Graduate School of Design in September. Image © Yusuke Suzuki for Harvard GSD Events

ArchDaily got the chance to briefly speak with Pritzker-prize winning Portuguese architect Eduardo Souto de Moura when he (along with the Porto Metro Authority) received the Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design at the Harvard Graduate School of Design earlier this month. His design for the Metro system in Porto, Portugal garnered high praise from the jury, with member Rahul Mehrotra explaining that the project “shows generosity to the public realm unusual for contemporary infrastructure projects.” Upon receipt of the award, the head of the Porto Metro, João Velez Carvalho, thanked Souto de Moura for his efforts in this “urban revolution” and touted Porto as a destination in which people actively and enthusiastically seek out the architecture of Souto de Moura and fellow Portuguese architect Alvaro Siza. 

Souto de Moura spent a few moments with us to describe both the challenges and rewards of working on a project that saw the completion of 60 new stations constructed in 10 years within the sensitive fabric of the city of Porto—a UNESCO World Heritage site. 

ArchDaily: What is your opinion of architecture prizes?

Eduardo Souto de Moura: I won’t be modest, I like describing my opinion about them because the profession is so tough and difficult that is it complicated to achieve a high level of quality. So when you’re awarded a prize it’s like a confirmation of your effort. But the other thing is that a project is not the act of an individual, it’s a collective act. When there’s a prize, the press and the people, the “anonymous people,” go see the project and talk about it, critique it. That’s what gives me the motivation to continue in the profession. And every time it gets more difficult. 

UB House / Alejandro Restrepo Montoya + Camilo Andrés Mejía Bravo + Andrés Felipe Mesa Trujillo

01:00 - 23 September, 2013
Courtesy of Alejandro Restrepo Montoya
Courtesy of Alejandro Restrepo Montoya
  • Architects

    Alejandro Restrepo Montoya · Office Profile, Camilo Andrés Mejía Bravo, Andrés Felipe Mesa Trujillo
  • Location

    Medellín, Antioquia, Colombia
  • Design Team

    Álvaro Mauricio López Gómez, Juan Camilo Garcés Cuesta
  • Area

    465.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2009
  • Photographs

    Courtesy of Alejandro Restrepo Montoya

Courtesy of Alejandro Restrepo Montoya Courtesy of Alejandro Restrepo Montoya Courtesy of Alejandro Restrepo Montoya Courtesy of Alejandro Restrepo Montoya +35

Winners Announced for 2013 Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design

00:00 - 31 August, 2013
Northeastern Urban Integration Project in Medellín, Colombia, Courtesy of Harvard GSD
Northeastern Urban Integration Project in Medellín, Colombia, Courtesy of Harvard GSD

The Harvard Graduate School of Design (GSD) has announced the 11th Veronica Rudge Green Prize in Urban Design award winners: Eduardo Souto de Moura’s Metro do Porto in Porto, Portugal, and the Northeastern Urban Integration Project in Medellín, Colombia. 

When commenting on the significance of the two prize-winning projects, jury member Micahel Sorkin stated: "If there are lessons to be drawn for urban design from Medellín and Porto, I think the broader lesson has to do with the disruption of the segregation of the disciplines in the design field. Historically we have understood that Landscape Architecture sits in one place, Architecture in another, and Urban Design and Planning [in another, with all three disciplines] in constant conflict about their territorial rights. One of the things that is revolutionary about the Medellín project is that distinguishing among the disciplines is no longer possible."

More about the prize-winning projects, courtesy of the GSD:

Urban Current[s] Competition Entry / L+CC + Taller 301 + openfabric

01:00 - 19 August, 2013
Courtesy of L+CC + Taller 301 + openfabric
Courtesy of L+CC + Taller 301 + openfabric

A conceptual framework for the development of the city of Medellin, the Urban Current[s] competition proposal by L+CC (Land+Civilization Compositions), Taller 301, and openfabric considers it important to think of the river territory beyond a simple design of public space. Instead, this is seen as the opportunity to re-structure and establish a framework for the future development of Medellín. Their approach creates new principles for the development of the city by using all available resources (natural, social, economic, political, and cultural) to link the city with its history, its ecology, and the movement of people in the territory. More images and architects' description after the break.