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SelgasCano's Louisiana Hamlet Pavilion to House a School in Nairobi's Kibera Slum

04:00 - 13 February, 2016
SelgasCano's Louisiana Hamlet Pavilion to House a School in Nairobi's Kibera Slum, Courtesy of SelgasCano
Courtesy of SelgasCano

SelgasCano's Louisiana Hamlet Pavilion, designed in collaboration with Helloeverything, has been dismantled from its Copenhagen home and is set to be reconstructed in the sprawling Kibera slum, Nairobi, where it will begin a new life as a school. The structure, which is in transit to one of the largest slums in the country, will replace a dilapidated shelter which currently houses 600 pupils. The pavilion, originally commissioned by the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art (Copenhagen), has been relocated following discussions between Iwan Baan, SelgasCano, the museum, and Second Home.

Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts Designs Low-Income Housing Prototypes in Mozambique

06:00 - 22 October, 2015
Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts Designs Low-Income Housing Prototypes in Mozambique, © Johan Mottelson
© Johan Mottelson

The Department of Human Settlements at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts' School of Architecture, Design, and Conservation has developed a new low-income housing prototype for Maputo, Mozambique in southeast Africa as part of the Casas Melhoradas research project. The prototype reinterprets the area’s traditional “Casa de Madeira e Zinco,” which is made of wood and corrugated iron sheets, and the "Casa de Blocos," which is composed of concrete blocks.  

Diébédo Francis Kéré: "Architecture is About People"

12:18 - 26 August, 2015

On the Louisiana Channel's latest installment, Burkinabé architect Diébédo Francis Kéré discusses his "Canopy" installation, currently on view at the Louisiana Museum in Denmark, and shares thoughts on the impact of architecture. Designed with a sense of freedom that encourages users to interact with the installation as they wish, Kere's Canopy serves as a flexible gathering space within the museum that is reminiscent of "AFRICA." 

“They’re free to use the space like they behave, like they feel," says Kere. "Architecture is about people."

Exhibition: AFRICA at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art

19:30 - 25 June, 2015
Exhibition: AFRICA at Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Kéré Architecture (Burkina Faso): Gando Secondary School, 2013 Foto: Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk
Kéré Architecture (Burkina Faso): Gando Secondary School, 2013 Foto: Erik-Jan Ouwerkerk

The exhibition AFRICA is the third and last in the series architecture, culture and identity. It focuses on the area called sub-Saharan Africa – the part of Africa south of the Sahara Desert. Louisiana’s wish to mount this exhibition has its origin in a very simple observation: despite the fact that Africa is the world’s second-largest continent, surprisingly little contemporary culture from there comes our way.

Video: Olafur Eliasson Discusses the Authorship of Reality in "Riverbed" Exhibition

00:00 - 30 November, 2014

"There are no real things. This is it. We are living in models and that's how it will always be and has always been... Who has authorship of reality? Who is then real?"

In this new video from Louisiana Channel, Olafur Eliasson meditates on the deeply philosophical questions posed by his provocative exhibition, RiverbedDiscussing themes such as the currency of trust, the authorship of reality through choice of perception, and the intricate relationships between museum, art, artist, and viewer, Eliasson sits within his own artificial landscape and recounts the deep inquiries that drive his work. Describing his views on the complexity of trust in the foundational value of the museum as an institution, Eliasson argues for the empowerment of the public. "If an audience feels trusted," he states, "then they dare to get involved."

Video: Three Writers On Olafur Eliasson's Riverbed

00:00 - 5 October, 2014

In this video from the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art's Lousiana Channel, three acclaimed writers - Sjón, James McBride and Daniel Kehlmann - talk about their experience of Olafur Eliasson's Indoor Riverbed at the Danish museum. Sjón describes how he felt when he saw 180 tons of rock from his home country of Iceland filling the room, saying "It was like a moment in a dream, when you enter a room and something is not right, but familiar."

Olafur Eliasson Creates an Indoor Riverbed at Danish Museum

00:00 - 22 August, 2014
Olafur Eliasson Creates an Indoor Riverbed at Danish Museum, © Louisiana Museum of Modern Art
© Louisiana Museum of Modern Art

Blurring the boundaries between the Natural world and the Manmade in one wide, sweeping gesture, Danish-Icelandic artist Olafur Eliasson's first solo exhibit, aptly titled Riverbed, brings the Outdoors in.

Recreating an enormous, ruggedly enchanting landscape, complete with riverbed and rocky earth, the artist draws heavily from site-specific inspiration. The Louisiana Museum of Modern Art's location on the Danish coast lends a raw, elemental and powerful character that extends into the building as a major intervention, transforming into a work of art.

© Louisiana Museum of Modern Art © Louisiana Museum of Modern Art © Louisiana Museum of Modern Art © Louisiana Museum of Modern Art +9

VIDEO: Henning Larsen Architects on Building Ambitions for Society

00:00 - 7 March, 2014

From Henning Larsen Architects. "Architecture is the opposite of the coca-cola-principle," says Louis Becker, director of Henning Larsen Architects, in this interview with Louisiana Channel. He continues by explaining that architecture is, first and foremost, about seeing things grow. With architecture your dreams become physical: “We are building our ambitions for society.” If architecture was separate from life and society, it would be an uninteresting form and space. The inside of a building must have a relation to the outside; there has to be a dialogue between the life and hope inside, and the city as a whole.

Architecture is also a merger of cultures and ideas. Scandinavian ideas of transparency, democracy and equal access affect the way Henning Larsen Architects approaches architecture. But, at the same time, it is very important to think of what is necessary in the nature, culture and climate that you are working with. "When two different ways of seeing the world meet, that's when something interesting happens."

In this video, Becker explains these ideas in relation to two very different projects, one in Saudia Arabia and The Harpa Concert Hall in Reyjavik, Iceland (which was made in collaboration with artist Olafur Eliasson and won the prestigious Mies van der Rohe award in 2013).