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Round-Up: Tall Stories From Monocle 24's 'The Urbanist'

07:30 - 8 July, 2016
Round-Up: Tall Stories From Monocle 24's 'The Urbanist', Courtesy of Monocle
Courtesy of Monocle

A new collection of five minute-long Tall Stories—developed by the team behind The UrbanistMonocle 24's weekly "guide to making better cities—guide the listener through the condensed narratives of a series of architectural projects from around the globe, encompassing their conception, development, use and, in some cases, eventual demise. We've selected eight of our favorites from the ongoing series, ranging from London’s Casson Pavilion to Honolulu's Waikiki Natatorium War Memorial, and the Estadio Centenario stadium in Montevideo.

Drapers Field / Kinnear Landscape Architects

13:00 - 6 July, 2016
Drapers Field / Kinnear Landscape Architects , © Adrian Taylor
© Adrian Taylor

© Adrian Taylor © Adrian Taylor © Adrian Taylor © Adrian Taylor +11

Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

10:30 - 28 June, 2016
Round-Up: The Serpentine Pavilion Through the Years

Lasting for close to two decades now, the annual Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Exhibition has become one of the most anticipated architectural events in London and for the global architecture community. With this year’s edition featuring not just one pavilion but four additional “summer houses,” the program shows no sign of slowing down. Each of the previous sixteen pavilions have been thought-provoking, leaving an indelible mark and strong message to the architectural community. And even though each of the past pavilions are removed from the site after their short summer stints to occupy far-flung private estates, they continue to be shared through photographs, and in architectural lectures. With the launch of the 16th Pavilion this month, we take a look back at all the previous pavilions and their significance to the architecturally-minded public. 

Serpentine Pavilion 2013. Image © Neil MacWilliams Serpentine Pavilion 2000. Image © Hélène Binet Serpentine Pavilion 2006. Image © John Offenbach Serpentine Pavilion 2015. Image © © Iwan Baan +34

Serpentine Summer House / Barkow Leibinger

05:00 - 23 June, 2016
Serpentine Summer House  / Barkow Leibinger, © Iwan Baan
© Iwan Baan

© Iwan Baan © Iwan Baan Model Concept +23

  • Architects

  • Location

    United Kingdom, Kensington Gardens, London W2 2UH, UK
  • Architect in Charge

    Frank Barkow, Regine Leibinger
  • Area

    50.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2016
  • Photographs

Hackney New School / Henley Halebrown Rorrison Architects

03:00 - 22 June, 2016
Hackney New School  / Henley Halebrown Rorrison Architects, © David Grandorge
© David Grandorge

© David Grandorge © David Grandorge © David Grandorge © David Grandorge +29

  • Architects

    Henley Halebrown Rorrison, HHbR
  • Location

    Kingsland Rd, London, United Kingdom
  • Project Architect

    Noel Cash
  • Area

    5500.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2015
  • Photographs

FORBES MASSIE STUDIO: SEDUCTION OF LIGHT

11:30 - 20 June, 2016
FORBES MASSIE STUDIO: SEDUCTION OF LIGHT, Forbes Massie Studio, Summer Exhibition
Forbes Massie Studio, Summer Exhibition

The exhibition celebrates the imagery of Forbes Massie Studio by presenting a collection of their latest commissions with renowned UK and international architectural practices, on exceptional and high profile projects. Entitled 'Seduction of Light', the collection emphasizes the Studio's approach to image making, focusing particular attention to Composition, Light, Materiality and Atmosphere.

A Filmic Adaption of Ballard's High-Rise Is a Visceral Complement to a Dystopian Vision

09:30 - 20 June, 2016
A Filmic Adaption of Ballard's High-Rise Is a Visceral Complement to a Dystopian Vision, The Brutalist high-rises in Ben Wheatley’s new film were inspired in part by Ernö Goldfinger’s Trellick and Balfron towers in London. Image Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures
The Brutalist high-rises in Ben Wheatley’s new film were inspired in part by Ernö Goldfinger’s Trellick and Balfron towers in London. Image Courtesy of Magnolia Pictures

This article was originally published on Metropolis Magazine as “Dystopia in the Sky."

For architects, if I may generalize an entire professional community, there are few novelists as cultishly beloved as J.G. Ballard. Borges or Calvino have their fair share of admirers, but to borrow an adjective more frequently applied to buildings, Ballard is the most iconic of literary figures—especially for readers of a concrete-expansion-joint persuasion. Witnessing war as a child, training in medicine, and thereafter writing from a rather bloodless middle-class patch of suburbia, Ballard spun tales of urban life that continue to be uncomfortably visceral.

AD Classics: Palace of Westminster / Charles Barry & Augustus Pugin

04:00 - 20 June, 2016
AD Classics: Palace of Westminster / Charles Barry & Augustus Pugin, The Palace of Westminster as seen from the River Thames. Image Courtesy of Flickr user Alex Brown
The Palace of Westminster as seen from the River Thames. Image Courtesy of Flickr user Alex Brown

At 6:20pm on the evening of October 16, 1834, a fire began in the old Palace of Westminster in London – the foremost seat of parliamentary governance for both the United Kingdom and the British Empire across the seas. The inferno, which burned until the early hours of the morning, destroyed so much of the medieval complex that neither restoration nor preservation were considered viable options – a new palace would have to rise from the ashes to surround the largely undamaged Westminster Hall.[1] The fire gave the United Kingdom a chance not only to replace what was considered as an outdated, patchwork of government buildings, but to erect a Gothic Revival landmark to spiritually embody the pre-eminence of the United Kingdom across the world, and the roots of modern democracy.

Elevation. Image Courtesy of Merrell Publishers Limited Drawing of the 'Estimates' design for the House of Lords by Pugin. ImageCourtesy of Yale University Press The original, unsatisfactory design for the House of Commons. ImageCourtesy of Yale University Press Plan. Image Courtesy of Yale University Press, Ltd. +13

Call for Submissions: LOBBY No.5 – "Faith"

12:00 - 19 June, 2016
Call for Submissions: LOBBY No.5 – "Faith", © LOBBY
© LOBBY

For centuries, faith has been a source of immeasurable blessings as well as uncountable catastrophes. People, no matter how different, have always felt protected under the aegis of a common belief and united to accomplish the unthinkable. But its fruitful potentials are only equal to its destructive dangers. Faith can be the most untameable of fires, and with the promise for righteousness or virtue it can tear families apart, close down borders, promote genocide, foster war.

Gallery: Wolfgang Buttress' Relocated Expo Pavilion, The Hive, Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

06:30 - 19 June, 2016
Gallery: Wolfgang Buttress' Relocated Expo Pavilion, The Hive, Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Wolfgang Buttress’ The Hive, a Gold Medal-winning UK Pavilion originally built for the 2015 Milan Expo, has been relocated to the Kew botanical gardens in central London. The striking (and photogenic) "beehive" was designed by the British practice to provide visitors with a glimpse into the life of a working bee; its 169,300 individual aluminium components—reaching 17-meters tall and fitted with hundreds of LED lights—created a multi-sensory experience that shed light on the importance of the pollinator. Following its relocation, photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has turned his lens to this installation and its new home.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu +23

Allies and Morrison Propose Alternative to Contested Garden Bridge

16:00 - 15 June, 2016
Allies and Morrison Propose Alternative to Contested Garden Bridge, Courtesy of Allies and Morrison
Courtesy of Allies and Morrison

Thomas Heatherwick’s Garden Bridge project has been under fire since plans were announced in 2013, drawing skepticism of the fairness of the competition process, and even being called “nothing but a wasteful blight.” Last month, London's new mayor Sadiq Khan gave a lukewarm endorsement of the project, noting that since £37.7m of the £60m allocated by the government has already been spent, scrapping the project now would end up costing taxpayers more than going forward with it.

The current predicament has inspired architects Allies and Morrison to design an alternative option – one that could both save the taxpayers money and create a new greenway spanning the Thames. Many of the complaints directed toward the original design have been associated with the cost of building a new bridge that would serve limited transportation needs; Allies and Morrison eliminate this issue by simply placing a garden pathway onto an existing piece of infrastructure, the nearby Blackfriars Bridge.

Observation Pod at World’s Most Slender Tower Reaches Maximum Height

12:00 - 15 June, 2016
Observation Pod at World’s Most Slender Tower Reaches Maximum Height, © British Airways i360
© British Airways i360

After weeks of movement testing, the British Airways i360 observation pod has achieved its maximum height of 138 meters as the attraction enters final inspection phases in preparation for its opening this summer. As a part of “the world’s tallest moving observation tower,” the 18 meter diameter viewing pod will provide 360 degree views of the British seaside resort towns of Brighton and Hove, the Sussex coast and the English Channel, for to up to 200 passengers at a time.

Gallery: Herzog & de Meuron's Tate Modern Extension Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu

10:15 - 15 June, 2016
Gallery: Herzog & de Meuron's Tate Modern Extension Photographed by Laurian Ghinitoiu, © Laurian Ghinitoiu
© Laurian Ghinitoiu

Herzog & de Meuron's ten-storey extension to London's Tate Modern, which officially opens to the public this week, is the latest in a series of ambitious building projects pursued by the internally renowned gallery of contemporary art. Sitting above The Tanks, the world's first dedicated galleries for live art and film installations, the building's pyramidical form provides 60% more exhibition space for the institution. Two days before its doors welcome art-lovers from around the world, photographer Laurian Ghinitoiu has captured a collection of unique views on this highly anticipated addition to London's skyline.

© Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu © Laurian Ghinitoiu +46

Winners of London Internet Museum Competition Announced

12:00 - 14 June, 2016
Winners of London Internet Museum Competition Announced, Courtesy of Bee Breeders Architecture Competitions
Courtesy of Bee Breeders Architecture Competitions

Architecture competition organizers Bee Breeders have announced the winners of the London Internet Museum competition. This speculative project challenged architects to design a museum for “something historically profound and typologically unprecedented — the internet.” Given a site at the former Great Eastern Railway terminal station building, designers were tasked with creating a location that would “connect visitors to both the history of the internet and open them to the possibilities of the future.” Submissions took a wide variety of approaches, and prizes were awarded to projects that rejected the typical associations and precedents that the internet calls to mind.

Continue reading to see the winning entries with brief descriptions.

Architectural Research in Pedagogy and Practice – in Conversation with Adrian Lahoud

04:00 - 10 June, 2016
Architectural Research in Pedagogy and Practice – in Conversation with Adrian Lahoud, Petrocasas en El Tuy, October 30, 2010. Image © Oscar Tenreiro
Petrocasas en El Tuy, October 30, 2010. Image © Oscar Tenreiro

The following interview with Adrian Lahoud was first published by Volume Magazine in their 48th issue, The Research Turn. You can read the Editorial of this issue, Research Horizonshere.

The political left has had a rough few decades; everything just seems to be going in the other direction. Instead of romanticizing what it would be like "only if," we’d better get to work on figuring out how to turn the engine of progress around. Volume spoke with Adrian Lahoud about the stakes of architectural research within the academy today and how it might contribute to moving towards the horizons of the left.

BIG and Lacaton & Vassal Lead Shortlist for Museum of London's Future Home at West Smithfield

12:30 - 9 June, 2016
BIG and Lacaton & Vassal Lead Shortlist for Museum of London's Future Home at West Smithfield, Courtesy of Malcolm Reading Consultants
Courtesy of Malcolm Reading Consultants

The Museum of London has released a shortlist and designs for the West Smithfield International Design Competition, organized by Malcolm Reading Consultants. The site, which will be the museum’s future home after outgrowing its place at the Barbican, is part of London’s Smithfield Market and includes the Smithfield General Market building, the Fish Market, the Red House and the Engine House. Welcoming over a million annual visitors at its current home, the museum’s new facility would allow attendance to double and enable the display of never-before-seen artifacts from the historic collection. The competition was funded by the Mayor of London through a £200,000 grant.

Foster + Partners Open Exhibition in London Highlighting Their Industrial Design Work

08:00 - 28 May, 2016
Foster + Partners Open Exhibition in London Highlighting Their Industrial Design Work, © Nigel Young/Foster + Partners
© Nigel Young/Foster + Partners

Foster + Partners' Craft + Manufacture: Industrial Design exhibition is currently on display at The Aram Gallery in London. It is the firm’s first exhibition dedicated to the industrial design work they have created over the past fifty years. It shows how “the science, art, and craft of making things” has been the foundation of the firm, and how the “collaborative nature of the design team pioneered by Norman Foster” has been translated into their architectural practice.

Elytra Filament Pavilion Explores Biomimicry at London's Victoria and Albert Museum

08:00 - 25 May, 2016
Elytra Filament Pavilion Explores Biomimicry at London's Victoria and Albert Museum , © NAARO via the V&A
© NAARO via the V&A

The Victoria and Albert Museum has unveiled its latest installation: the Elytra Filament Pavilion, a project displaying the culmination of four years of research on the integration of architecture, engineering, and biomimicry principles, in an exploration of how biological fiber systems can be transferred to architecture.

The 200-square-meter structure is inspired by lightweight construction principles found in nature, namely "the fibrous structures of the forewing shells of flying beetles known as elytra," states a press release.