Does Devolution Hold The Key To Greater Investment In The Built Environment?

00:00 - 5 November, 2014
Manchester Town Hall (Alfred Waterhouse)
Manchester Town Hall (Alfred Waterhouse)

The British city of Manchester, often seen as the UK's second city alongside Birmingham, will become the first metropolis outside of London to be given greater local autonomy over budgets and city planning. The devolution deal, which will also see the city receive the right to directly elect a Mayor (in line with large cities in the US, for example), will furnish the city with "a new housing investment fund worth up to £300million." As it is understood that the first Mayor of Greater Manchester will be elected in 2017, there's time to discuss how this new political environment in the UK might help boost building in what has described as a "Northern Powerhouse."

Exploring A Radical Future For Our Urban Waterways

00:00 - 4 November, 2014

In the third and final installment of their micro documentary series on architecture and waterEllis Woodman and a team at the Architectural Review (AR) have collaborated with architects, developers, urbanists and thinkers to examine the latent connections between water infrastructure and our built environment. Taking a journey by narrowboat through , the film explores the radical ideas which may offer the keys to unlocking the potential of the urban waterway. Through recreation, interaction and radical ideas such as floating parks, amphibious houses and new public wetlands can the river become a living part of the city?

Video: Peter Murray of New London Architecture Outlines his Cycling Vision

00:00 - 2 November, 2014

In the latest video from Crane.tv, architectural journalist and planner Peter Murray ruminates on the benefits of integrating cycling into the urban fabric of the world's biggest cities. "For the last half century, we've bowed down to the god of the motor car and have destroyed cities across the UK," says Murray, Chairman of New London Architecture and the London Society. Murray and his team at New London Architecture are charged with analyzing and advocating for the improvement of London's Built environment, acting as advisors to Mayor Boris Johnson on an array of projects including the overhaul of cycling infrastructure in the city.

Studio Octopi Proposes Floating Swimming Pool in the Thames

01:00 - 30 October, 2014
The latest iteration of the design proposed for Victoria Embankment. Image © Studio Octopi / Picture Plane
The latest iteration of the design proposed for Victoria Embankment. Image © Studio Octopi / Picture Plane

A proposal to create a floating swimming pool in the Thames river will step up a gear tomorrow, as Studio Octopi will present their design for the Thames Baths at the Guardian's World Cities Day Challenge. Originally created as part of the Architecture Foundation's competition to design ways to reconnect Londoners with the river, the Thames Baths design has gained momentum over the last year, with a recent iteration of the design proposed for London's Victoria Embankment.

More on the design after the break

A Contemporary Renovation for a Classic Mayfair Office / Brady Mallalieu Architects

01:00 - 29 October, 2014
© David Jensen Photography
© David Jensen Photography

© David Jensen Photography © David Jensen Photography © David Jensen Photography © David Jensen Photography +14

Article 25 Auctions 100 Artworks By Leading Architects in 10x10 Fundraiser

01:00 - 29 October, 2014
By Derek Draper. Image Courtesy of Article 25
By Derek Draper. Image Courtesy of Article 25

Architectural aid charity Article 25 has unveiled the drawings for its most important annual fundraising event, the 10x10 Drawing the City Auction. Featuring drawings donated by leading architects including Norman Foster, Ivan HarbourSheila O'Donnell, Terry Farrell and Ken Shuttleworth among many others, in previous years the 10x10 auction has raised over £90,000 for the charity, and this year it is hoped that it will top £100,000.

The 10x10 concept divides a section of the city up into a 10 by 10 square grid, with each participating architect assigned a section of the grid where they must find inspiration for an artwork. This year, the grid centred on the Shard, where this year's auction will be held on November 27th. In the lead-up to the auction, bidding will also be available online from November 4th-25th, at the 10x10 website.

Read on after the break for another 20 of the pieces to be auctioned

By Eva Jiricna. Image Courtesy of Article 25 By Matthew Lloyd. Image Courtesy of Article 25 By Paul Williams. Image Courtesy of Article 25 By Bill Hanway. Image Courtesy of Article 25 By CJ Lim. Image Courtesy of Article 25 By Ian Ritchie. Image Courtesy of Article 25 By Roger Fitzgerald. Image Courtesy of Article 25 By Will Alsop. Image Courtesy of Article 25 +21

'The Rom' Becomes Europe's First Listed Skatepark

00:00 - 29 October, 2014
© Played in Britain
© Played in Britain

English Heritage has awarded a Grade-II listing to "The Rom," a skatepark in Hornchurch on the outskirts of London. Built in 1978, the Rom was one of the UK's first wave of purpose-built skateparks, and probably the most complete example found in the UK today. The listing makes the Rom the first protected skatepark in Europe, and just the second in the world after Tampa's "Bro Bowl" was added to the USA’s National Register of Historic Places last year.

More on the listing decision after the break

© Played in Britain © Played in Britain © Played in Britain © Played in Britain +6

The Question of Gentrification Along London's Urban Waterways

00:00 - 28 October, 2014

In the second installment of their new three-part micro documentary series on architecture and water (see the first part here), Ellis Woodman and a team at the Architectural Review (AR) have collaborated with architects, developers, urbanists and thinkers to examine the latent connections between water infrastructure and our built environment. Taking a journey by narrowboat through , the film explores the radical ideas which may offer the keys to unlocking the potential of the urban waterway. When London has an ever-increasing overwhelming need for growth, how does the densification and gentrification of the city relate to the rivers and canals?

A Mobile Italian Garden Overlooking London

00:00 - 24 October, 2014
© Dosfotos
© Dosfotos

The Decorators, an interdisciplinary group of practitioners working with space in London, recently transformed the terrace overlooking the city at Alexandra Palace by installing a mobile Italian garden. As a "landscape of scattered objects" which geometrically piece together to resemble a formal garden, the designers describe the project as somewhere between "grotto and folly, garden and landscape, stage and amphitheater," all the while drawing from the historical character of the surrounding context. The scheme ultimately "breaks the monumental proportions of the main building to meet visitors with a more intimate scale on their first encounter" with the palace.

© Dosfotos © Dosfotos © Dosfotos © Dosfotos +8

Architecture & Water: Exploring Radical Ideas To Unlock The Potential of Urban Waterways

00:00 - 23 October, 2014

In the first part of their new micro documentary series on architecture and water, Ellis Woodman and a team at the Architectural Review (AR) have collaborated with architects, developers, urbanists and thinkers to examine the latent connections between water infrastructure and our built environment. Taking a journey by narrowboat through London, discussing a raft of radical ideas which may offer the keys to unlocking the potential of the river along the way, the films discuss how we might begin to shape the contemporary city's relationship with its urban waterways. Can "floating parks, amphibious houses, floodable public squares, new wetlands or brand new canals foster a more meaningful relationship between the citizen and the city’s waters?"

Wright & Wright Unveils Scheme to Replace Chipperfield's Plans for Geffrye Museum

00:00 - 22 October, 2014
View from Hoxton Station, Geffrye Street. Image © Wright & Wright Architects
View from Hoxton Station, Geffrye Street. Image © Wright & Wright Architects

Wright & Wright Architects has revealed their designs for the Geffrye Museum in East London, a £15 million redesign that will increase the museum's total space by almost 40% through "unlocking" previously unused areas of the museum's 18th century almshouses. The design replaces a scheme by David Chipperfield Architects, which last year failed to secure planning permission in part because of the hugely controversial proposal to demolish the former Marquis of Lansdown Pub that occupies the corner of the site.

Spotlight: Sir Christopher Wren

01:00 - 20 October, 2014
St. Paul's Cathedral, London. Image © Flickr CC User locosteve
St. Paul's Cathedral, London. Image © Flickr CC User locosteve

Sir Christopher Wren (20 October 1632 - 25 February 1723) is one the most significant architects in England's history, and was a recognized astronomer, scholar, and physicist-mathematician. Wren was classically trained at University of Oxford in physics and engineering where he developed his interest in architecture. He is perhaps most famous for designing London's iconic St. Paul's Cathedral, however he is credited with the design of dozens of other churches, government buildings, and hospitals in England. Wren was knighted in 1673.

Hampton Court Palace, London. Image © Flickr CC User Pembleton Old Royal Navy College, Greenwich. Image © Flickr CC User Nicholas Schooley Trinity College Library, Cambridge. Image © Flickr CC User bethmoon527 St. Paul's Cathedral, London. Image © Flickr CC User locosteve +5

LSE Saw Hock Student Centre / O’Donnell + Tuomey Architects

01:00 - 14 October, 2014
© Alex Bland
© Alex Bland
  • Architects

  • Location

    Houghton Street, London School of Economics and Political Science, London WC2A 2AE, UK
  • Design Team

    John Tuomey, Sheila O’Donnell, Willie Carey, Geoff Brouder, Laura Harty, Kirstie Smeaton, Gary Watkin, Anne-Louise Duignan, Ciara Reddy, Jitka Leonard, Iseult O’Cleary, Henrik Wolterstorff, Mark Grehan, Monika Hinz
  • Area

    6101.0 sqm
  • Project Year

    2013
  • Photographs

    Alex Bland, Dennis Gilbert

© Alex Bland © Alex Bland © Alex Bland © Dennis Gilbert +59

63 Compton / Doone Silver Architects

01:00 - 11 October, 2014

Interactive Infographic Tracks the Growth of the World's Megacities

00:00 - 11 October, 2014
Tokyo remains the world's largest city, but is beginning to see competition from the world's other megacities. Image © Flickr CC User Les Taylor
Tokyo remains the world's largest city, but is beginning to see competition from the world's other megacities. Image © Flickr CC User Les Taylor

With more than 7 billion people now alive, the greatest population growth over the last century has occurred in urban areas. Now, a new series of interactive maps entitled "The Age of Megacities" and developed by software company ESRI allows us to visualize these dramatic effects and see just how this growth has shaped the geography of 10 of the world’s 28 megacities. Defined as areas with continuous urban development of over 10 million people, the number of megacities in the world is expected to increase, and while Tokyo still tops the list as the world’s largest megacity, other cities throughout Asia are quickly catching up. Find out more after the break.

Three Talks to Debate the Future of Life on London's Rivers

00:00 - 9 October, 2014
© Flickr CC User mariusz kluzniak
© Flickr CC User mariusz kluzniak

As part of the their Architecture for All programme, London's Old Royal Naval College is set to host three debates about the future planned along the River Thames, investigating the issues surrounding living, building and working on the City's waterways in the years to come. The series is curated by Ellis Woodman, critic for the Architects' Journal and the Architectural Review, who said: "Despite the fact that the riverfront is currently the subject of redevelopment proposals of unprecedented scale, London’s ambitions for the Thames have yet to be widely articulated or debated." Details of the three events after the break.

Architects Envision Buoyant "Thames Deckway" for London Cyclists

00:00 - 8 October, 2014
© RCC
© RCC

On the heels of Mayor Boris Johnson’s announced plan to construct an 18-mile protected bike lane by March 2016, architect David Nixon and artist Anna Hill have released their vision for relieving London’s congested streets with a floating “Thames Deckway” for cyclists. The proposal, though just in its preliminary design phase, claims the river Thames is currently a missed opportunity that could serve as a major travel artery for cyclists. If constructed, the £600 million project would run east-west for seven miles along the river’s southern bank, from Battersea to Canary Wharf, and harness it’s own energy through solar, tidal and wind power. Nixon and Hill have founded the River Cycleway Consortium in support of the project, which includes Arup and Hugh Broughton Architects.

Merchant Square Footbridge / Knight Architects

01:00 - 7 October, 2014

© Edmund Sumner © Edmund Sumner © Peter Cook © Edmund Sumner +12