AD Classics: The Crystal Palace / Joseph Paxton

The Crystal Palace, 1851. © wikiarquitectura.com

The Crystal Palace was a glass and cast iron structure built in , , for the Great Exhibition of 1851. The building was designed by Sir Joseph Paxton, an architect and gardener, and revealed breakthroughs in architecture, construction and design. More on the Crystal Palace after the break…

South Molton Street Building / DSDHA

Courtesy of DSDHA

Architects: DSDHA
Location: , England,
Area: 1227.5 sqm
Year: 2012
Photographs: Courtesy of DSDHA, Courtesy of Bosideng, Dennis Gilbert

Olympic Energy Centres / John McAslan + Partners

© Hufton + Crow

Architects: John McAslan + Partners
Location: Borough of Hackney,
Architect In Charge: John McAslan + Partners
Area: 7,500 sqm
Year: 2011
Photographs: Hufton + Crow

BBC New Broadcasting House / HOK

Courtesy of

Architects: HOK, MacCormac Jamieson Prichard, Sheppard Robson
Location: London, England, United Kingdom
Area: 484.375 ft2
Year: 2013
Photographs: Courtesy of HOK

Wimbledon Master Plan Proposal / Grimshaw + Grant Associates

Courtesy of

The All Lawn Tennis Club has just unveiled this design proposal for the Wimbledon Master Plan developed by Grimshaw Architects, with top UK landscape architecture firm, Grant Associates.  Marking the first step in a consultation process, the vision reflects and reinforces the long history of The Championships while further enhancing Wimbledon’s position as the premier Grand Slam tennis event. More images and architects’ description after the break.

In Progress: The Leadenhall Building / Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners

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Architects: Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners
Location: London, England,
Structural Engineer: Arup
Landscape Architect: Edco Design London
Client: The British Land Company plc
Area: 84,424 sqm
Year: 2013
Photographs: Courtesy of Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, Courtesy of The Leadenhall Building Development Company

Rogers Stirk Harbour & Partners’ Leadenhall Building became the tallest building in the City of London when it topped out on June 18th. The 50 story tower opposite Lloyd’s of London rises to a height of 224.5 meters 802 feet), its slender form creating its own distinctive profile within an emerging cluster London. The building’s tapering profile is prompted by a requirement to respect views of St Paul’s Cathedral, in particular from Fleet Street. The building comprises a number of distinct architectural elements that provide clarity to the composition both as a whole and as a legible expression of its constituent parts. These elements include the primary stability structure, the ladder frame, the office floor plates, the northern support core, the external envelope and the public realm.

More images and video of The Leadenhall Building after the break…

‘Richard Rogers RA: Inside Out’ Exhibition

Focusing on key projects and using previously unseen archival material, drawings and personal items, the ‘Richard Rogers RA: Inside Out‘ exhibition will explore Roger’s career, from the influence of his Italian family to his impact on how we experience cities today. From July 18-October 13 at the Royal Academy of Arts in , visitors will gain an unprecedented insight into this leader of modern design. This blend of political, social and ethical concerns, as well as popular culture, technology, art and urbanism is manifest not only in his architecture, but also in his roles as a speaker, writer, politician and activist. For more information, please visit here.

Peace Pavilion / Atelier Zündel Cristea

© Sergio Grazia

Architects: Atelier Zündel Cristea
Location: Museum Gardens, Bethnal Green, ,
Constructor: TP Arquitectura i Construccio Tèxtil
Exhibition Period: May/June 2013
Year: 2013
Photographs: Sergio Grazia

Sou Fujimoto’s Serpentine Pavilion Through the Lens of James Aiken

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Dazzling viewers with its “tron-like landscape of infinite white,” as described by Guardian critic Oliver Wainwright, ’s Serpentine Pavilion in Hyde Park is arguably “one of the most radical pavilions to date.” The 350 square-meter latticed structure melts into its surrounding by fusing together the man-made and natural world, creating a lush, semi-transparent terrain in which transforms into a variety of seating, steps and side tables that complement its interior coffee bar (view more images here).

This video was provided by film maker James Aiken, in collaboration with The , and commissioned by COS.

2013 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion / Sou Fujimoto, Photos by Danica Kus

© Danica Kus

Featured here are photos of Sou Fujimoto‘s 2013 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion taken by Danica Kus. Capturing the semi-transparent, multi-purpose social space situated in London, this delicate, three-dimensional structure is enjoyed by its visitors, creating an inviting social setting.

Fujimoto, the youngest architect to accept the ’s invitation at 41, describes his work as, “…a transparent terrain that encourages people to interact with and explore the site in diverse ways. Within the pastoral context of Kensington Gardens, I envisage the vivid greenery of the surrounding plant life woven together with a constructed geometry. A new form of environment will be created, where the natural and the man-made merge; not solely architectural nor solely natural, but a unique meeting of the two.” More images by Danica Kus after the break.

Fujimoto’s Serpentine Pavilion Receives High Praise from Critics

© Daniel Portilla

With the opening of his cloud-like gridded structure in Hyde Park last week, Sou Fujimoto became the youngest architect in the pantheon of Serpentine Gallery Pavilion designers. The pavilion is an annual commission for a temporary structure, always given to a well known architect who is yet to build in the . In previous years the commission has been awarded to Herzog & de Meuron with Ai Weiwei (2012), Peter Zumthor (2011), Jean Nouvel (2010), SANAA (2009), stretching back to the original pavilion designed by Zaha Hadid in 2000.

With such a prolific history of star designers over the past 13 years, Fujimoto’s ethereal design has a lot to live up to. But despite these high expectations, architecture critics have been gushing over the new design. See a full round-up of opinions after the break…

Serpentine Pavilion / Sou Fujimoto

© Daniel Portilla

This Thursday, the official opening of the Serpentine Pavilion, by , took place in Hyde Park, . It was the first time the public could interact with the structure.

The pavilion, which has already gotten the “cloud” nickname because of its shape and lightness, is generated through a three-dimensional steel grid of about 40 centimetre modules which morphs on each side. The structure is broken to allow people access as well as to generate different uses around, below and upon it.

More pictures and the architect’s statement after the break.

BskyB Sky Studios / Arup Associates

© Christian Richters

Architects: Arup Associates
Location: , , UK
Client: BSkyB and Stanhope
Photographs: Christian Richters

Skaters Object to Southbank Centre Proposals

© Feilden Clegg Bradley

The saga of the Southbank Centre redevelopment in London heated up recently, after the scheme for the new ‘Festival Wing‘ was formally submitted to Lambeth’s planning department. The scheme, which has been well received by some of the architecture community, including the centre’s original architects Norman Engleback and Dennis Crompton, has run afoul of the skateboarding community, which opposes the plan to infill the undercroft that has been their home for almost 40 years.

After a petition to save the skatepark garnered over 40,000 signatures, the skating community has mobilized once again to object to the planning application en masse. The campaign to save the skatepark has even garnered the attention of skateboarding legend Tony Hawk, who wrote to the ’s director of partnership and policy Mike McCart to explain that:

“It’s truly an historic feature of London street culture, and is as well known to skateboarders around the world as Big Ben or Buckingham Palace. Honestly.”

2013 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion / Sou Fujimoto

© Iwan Baan

Sou Fujimoto’s 2013 Serpentine Pavilion, now complete and standing on the front lawn of ’s Serpentine Gallery, has opened to the press and we are now able to see Iwan Baan’s photographs of the temporary pavilion. Fujimoto will be lecturing to a sold out crowd this coming Saturday (June 8th) when the pavilion opens to the general public. The semi-transparent, multi-purpose social space will be on view until October 20th.

Fujimoto (age 41) is the youngest architect to accept the Serpentine Gallery’s invitation, joining the ranks of Herzog & de Meuron and Ai Weiwei (2012)Peter Zumthor (2011)Jean Nouvel (2010)SANAA (2009)and more. He described his Serpentine project as “…an architectural landscape: a transparent terrain that encourages people to interact with and explore the site in diverse ways. Within the pastoral context of Kensington Gardens, I envisage the vivid greenery of the surrounding plant life woven together with a constructed geometry. A new form of environment will be created, where the natural and the man-made merge; not solely architectural nor solely natural, but a unique meeting of the two.”

The Guardian has posted both print and video reviews by Oliver Wainwright.

More images by Iwan Baan after the break. See also In Progress: Serpentine Gallery Pavilion / Sou Fujimoto.

Public Realm Plan Proposal / Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios + Grant Associates

Courtesy of + Grant Associates

Westminster City Council has just announced Feilden Clegg Bradley Studios, urban designers and architects and Grant Associates, landscape architects, as part of a multidisciplinary team to devise a twenty-year infrastructure and public realm plan for Church Street, London, to support the council’s housing renewal strategy. Residents have just voted in favor of proceeding with the first phase of regeneration plans for Church Street in a ward-wide referendum. More images and architects’ description after the break.

New Headquarters for the Metropolitan Police Service Competition

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The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) just announced the launch of a new design competition on behalf of the Mayor’s Office for Policing and Crime (MOPAC) and Metropolitan Police Service (MPS) to create a new central London Headquarters – replacing their existing New Scotland Yard building. The Invited Design Competition provides architects/practices with the opportunity to produce a design for the renovation of this landmark in one of London’s most important and historic areas – to provide a modern, flexible and secure office environment for the MPS. The deadline for submissions is June 27. For more information, please visit here.

Farrells to Masterplan £1bn Business District in London

© Farrells / Stanhope / ABP China (Holding)

-based practice Farrells will be teaming up with UK developer Stanhope and commercial developer ABP China (Holding) to regenerate London’s historic docklands into a thriving, mixed-use business district. The deal, which represents one of the first direct investment by a Chinese developer in London’s property market, will act as a platform for financial, high-tech and knowledge driven industries looking to establish their business in UK and European markets.

More on the Farrells’ after the break…