Yongsan International Business District / REX

© Luxigon

Architect: REX
Location: , Korea
Built Area: 115,500 sqm (1,240,000 sqf)
Completion year: 2016
Program: 47,800 sqm of luxury housing for short-term residents, 27,000 sqm of retail, and 929 parking stalls
Renderings: Luxigon and Rex

Cross # Towers / BIG

Courtesy of

Danish architects BIG have just shared with us the Cross # Towers, their latest project in Seoul. BIG’s residential towers in the Yongsan International Business District revitalize the Han riverfront into a new commercial residential center for the citizens of Seoul. More images information after the break.

West 8 + IROJE wins Yongsan Park competition in Seoul

© urban design & landscape architecture

Rotterdam-based practice WEST 8, together with the local architects of IROJE, have been announced winner of the International Competition for Master Plan of Yongsan Park, Korea. The Ministry of Land, Transport Maritime Affairs of the Republic of Korea organized the competition with the intention to create a “national park in which nature, culture, history the future come in harmony.” Located in a large area in the center of Seoul, the circa 243 ha site has been in use as a military base for an extensive period both during the Japanese occupation under post-war American protection.

Continue reading for more information on the Yongsan Park competition.

Skinspace / AND

© Kim Yong Gwan

Architects: AND
Location: Seohoori, Seojongmyun, Yangpyeonggun, Gyeonggido,
Construction Area: 112.62 sqm
Gross Area: 130.60 sqm
Structure: RC
Completion: 2010
Photographs: Kim Yong Gwan

Ewha Womans University / Dominique Perrault Architecture

© André Morin / DPA / Adagp

Architects: Dominique Perrault Architecture
Location: Seoul,
Partners: Baum Architects, Seoul
Engineering: Perrault Projets, Paris (Architectural Engineers); VP&Green Ingenerie, Paris (Structural Engineers); HL-PP Consult, Munich (Building Services); Jean-Paul Lamoureux, Paris (Acoustic), Rache-Willms, Aix-la-Chapelle (Facades)
Consultant: Jeon and Lee Partners, Seoul (Structural Engineer), HIMEC, Seoul (Mechanical Engineer), CG E&C, Seoul (Civil Engineer), CnK Associates, Seoul (Landscape)
Built Area: 70,000 sqm
Completion: 2008
Photographs: André Morin

Herma Parking Building / JOHO Architecture

© Sun Namgoong

Architects: JOHO Architecture – Jeong Hoon Lee
Location: 1190, Bo jeong-dong, Kiheung-gu, Yong In, Gyonggi-Do,
Completion: May, 2010
Photographs: Sun Namgoong, Jeonghoon Lee

Soohwarim / Design Group Oz

© Kim Jae Kyeong

Architect: Design Group Oz  – Im Sang Jin, Shin Seung Soo, Choi Jae Won
Location: Hwangnak-ri, Haemi-myeon, Seosan-si, Chungcheongnam-do,
Site area: 976 sqm
Building area: 265.92 sqm
Gross floor area: 371.41sqm
Photographs: Kim Jae Kyeong, Lee Sang Muk

   

Lollipop House / Moon Hoon

©

Would you live here? Designed by Seoul-based practice Moon Hoon, this single family residence for Giheung-Gu, Korea is organized around a central stair that branches to seven different living levels.  Wrapped in a colorful facade of metal panels, the coloring choice provides a strong statement for the unusual residence along with conjuring images of a child’s favorite treat.  The clients urged Moon Hoon to explore the idea of multiple living planes which has resulted in a skip floor setup with a study, living area, kitchen dining area, master bedroom, children’s bedroom, attic playroom upper level room, stemming from the circulation core.  An atrium runs the height of the house allows natural light to illuminate the interiors.

More images and drawings after the break.

In Progress: Water Circle / UnSangDong Architects

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Architects: UnSangDong Architects
Location: 555-9 SongSan-li SeolAk-myeon GaPyung Kyeunggi-do,
Client: Cheong-shim
Bldg, Area: 505.00 sqm
Gross Floor Area: 637.40 sqm
Structure: R.C.
Photographs: Kyung-sub Shin

White Block Gallery / SsD

© Chang Kyun Kim

Architect: SsD
Location: , Korea
Team: Jinhee Park AIA + John Hong AIA, LEED (principals in charge), Frederick Peter Ortner, Donguk Lee, Jiseok Park, Taesoo Kim, Christoph Schäfer, Juho Lee, Marcela Delgado, Soojung Rhee, Aleta Budd, Okhyun Kim, Eli Allen, Jeff Niemasz, Eunkyoung Cho, Brian Vester, Ryan Welch, Jeong Jun Song
Associate Architect: Dyne Architects
Structural Design: Matt Johnson, SGH Inc.
Structural Engineer: S+RC
Lighting Consultant: Project Concept K
Construction Manager: Hanmi Parsons Co., Ltd
Photographs: Chang Kyun Kim

Paju Free School / UOSarchitects

© Park Wan Soon

Architect: UOSarchitects, Jung ki Jung
Location: 478-5, Seongdong-ri, Tanhyeon-myeon, Paju-si, , Korea
Client: kyoung sook, Cho
Site area: 1,794sqm
Total floor area: 1,630.70sqm
Consultant: Hi structure engineers(struct.), kunchang engineering(mep)
General contractor: Chungyong Construction co.,LTD.
Project year: 2009 ~ 2011
Photographs: Park Wan Soon 

   

Update: Developer moves forward with The Cloud / MVRDV

© Luxigon

Despite the controversy, the South Korean developer plans to move forward with MVRDV‘s design of The Cloud. The Dutch firm has received harsh criticism after releasing their design for the two residential towers that will be built in Seoul’s redeveloped Yongsan business district. Unconvinced by ’s sincere apologies, critics remain outraged, claiming the design resembles the collapsing World Trade Center following the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

White Paik, spokesman for the Yongsan Development Corporation, states, “Allegations that it [the design] was inspired by the 9/11 attacks are groundless.” Further stating that there will be no changes to the project. Construction will begin in January 2013 The Cloud is scheduled to be completed in 2015.

Connected by a cloud-shaped section halfway up the buildings, the additional program will include sky lounges, restaurants and a swimming pool. View more information on the design here on ArchDaily.

Reference: The Sydney Morning Herald

Controversy over The Cloud forces MVRDV to Apologize

© Luxigon

Dutch firm MVRDV has received harsh criticism since they revealed the proposal for two luxury residential towers in South Korea, named after its inspiration, The Cloud. The two towers are connected by a “pixilated cloud of additional program.” Critics are outraged, stating the design resembles the collapsing twin towers of the World Trade Center following the 9/11 terrorist attacks.

spokesman Jan Kinkker stated, “We’ve had quite a lot of calls from angry Americans saying it’s a disgrace. 9/11 was not the inspiration behind the design, the inspiration was a real cloud.” He added, “It was not our intention to create an image resembling the attacks nor did we see the resemblance during the design process. We sincerely apologize to anyone whose feelings we have hurt.”

Project developer Dream Corporation selected The Cloud design proposal over a number of other options will have the final say on whether or not they will consider another alternative.

Reference: BD

The Cloud: Two Connected Luxury Residential Towers / MVRDV

© Luxigon

The Cloud: Two Connected Luxury Residential Towers by MVRDVis a residential development of the Yongsan Business district. A 260 meter tall tower a 300 meter tall tower are connected in the center by a pixelated cloud of additional programs offering amenities outside spaces with wide views. The towers with a total surface of 128,000m2 are expected to be completed in 2015. More images project description after the break.

Gyesan Church / iArc Architects

© Youngchae Park

Architects: iArc Architects
Location: Incheon,
Year: Completed 2005
Area: 16,042 (Total Floor), 10,360 (Site)
Photographs: Youngchae Park

Cafe Mo’Better Blues / modo architect office

© Yum Seung Hoon

Architects: modo architect office
Location: ,
Project Year: 2009
Project Area: 276.46 sqm (GFA)
Photographs: Yum Seung Hoon

Saemangum Exhibition Center / poly.m.ur

© poly.m.ur

Saemangum is the name for the newly reclaimed area on the west coast of by the architecture urbanism firm poly.m.ur. It has been the country’s most anticipated reclamation project of recent years and promises enormous new opportunities for cultural commercial developments in the region. The brief was to provide an exhibition space to commemorate the completion of the work and showcase the visions and plans for this new land. The concept of the design was inspired by the lost mud flat in the area as the result of reclamation. Analogous to the mud flat, the building was designed to act as a ‘living field’, which breathe environment, programs, and activities.

zeep-soori of Professor Kim’s House / Moohoi Architecture

© Park young-chae

Architect:
Location: SeoDaemoon-Koo, , Korea
Lead Architect: Kim Jae-kwan
Written Material: Kim jae-kwan
Construction: Kim Jae-kwan
Site Area: 133.6 sqm
Project Area: 140.2 sqm
Project Year: 2011
Photographs: Park young-chae