‘George Nelson: Architect, Writer, Designer, Teacher’ Exhibition + Symposium

Courtesy of Yale School of Architecture

On view at the Yale School of Architecture Gallery from November 8-February 2, the ‘George Nelson: Architect, Writer, Designer, Teacher’ exhibition and symposium examines Nelson’s work in the context of both its own time and its legacy today. The event includes a comprehensive retrospective and symposium of one of the most influential figures in American design during the second half of the twentieth century. It will feature more than 120 three-dimensional objects including furniture, cabinets, lamps, and clocks, as well as fifty-plus historical documents in the form of drawings, photographs, architectural models and films. The symposium, ‘: Designs for Living’ will specifically be held November 9-10. For more information, please visit here.

 

Vitra Design Museum: George Nelson Installation

© Thomas Dix

In the year 2008, the American designer (1908-1986) would have celebrated his 100th birthday. To commemorate this occasion, the Vitra Design Museum exhibited the first comprehensive retrospective of his work. Nelson was one of the most influential figures in American design during the second half of the twentieth century. With an architectural degree from Yale, he was not only active in the fields of architecture and design, but was also a widely respected writer and publicist, lecturer, curator, and a passionate photographer. His office produced numerous furnishings and interior designs that became modern classics, including the Coconut Chair (1956), the Marshmallow Sofa (1956), the Ball Clock (1947) and the Bubble Lamps (1952 onwards). This same exhibition will be opened from October 29th, 2011 at the Bellevue Arts Museum in Seattle (until February 12th, 2012. More images and exhibition description after the break.