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Nine Projects to be Highlighted in 'In Therapy', the Nordic Contribution to the 2016 Venice Biennale

04:00 - 19 February, 2016
Nine Projects to be Highlighted in 'In Therapy', the Nordic Contribution to the 2016 Venice Biennale, RRA's National Tourist Route in Trollstigen is among nine selected projects which will be displayed in-depth. Image via RRA
RRA's National Tourist Route in Trollstigen is among nine selected projects which will be displayed in-depth. Image via RRA

The Swedish Centre for Architecture and Design (ArkDes) have revealed that In Therapy: Nordic Countries Face to Face—the exhibition for the Nordic Pavilion at the 2016 Venice Biennale, curated by David Basulto—will partly comprise "a contemporary survey of Nordic architecture." 300 projects, drawn from over 500 submissions to a recent open call, will be complemented by an in-depth study of nine projects completed post-2008 by practices including Tham & Videgård, Reiulf Ramstad Architects, and Lahdelma & Mahlamäki.

"Just as Sverre Fehn’s pavilion is a crystallisation of Nordic architecture—embodying a precise and fluid articulation of structure, light, and nature—the nine we have chosen to focus in on as particularly representative of the contemporary scene have a similar gravitas and complexity – but with their own distinct identities" says Basulto, who has made the selection alongside James Taylor-Foster, Assistant Curator.

Tree Hotel / Tham & Videgård (Harads, Sweden). Image © Lindman Photography Finnish Nature Centre /Lahdelma & Mahlamäki Architects (Haltia, Finland). Image © Mika Huisman Puukuokka Housing Block / OOPEAA Office for Peripheral Architecture (Jyväskylä, Finland). Image © Mikko Auerniitty Råå Daycare Center / Dorte Mandrup (Kustgaten, Sweden). Image © Adam Mørk +12

Erik Møller Arkitekter to Modernize Alvar Aalto’s Kunsten

16:08 - 26 May, 2014
Erik Møller Arkitekter to Modernize Alvar Aalto’s Kunsten, Kunsten Museum of Modern Art. Image via Wikipedia
Kunsten Museum of Modern Art. Image via Wikipedia

Erik Møller Arkitekter has been commissioned to modernize Alvar Aalto’s white marble Kunsten Museum of Modern Art in Denmark. As reported by BDOnline, the £14 million renovation will restore parts of the listed museum, as well as transform the building’s basement into a new 600 square meter exhibition space. 

The Architecture of Incarceration: Can Design Affect the Prison System?

00:00 - 26 July, 2013
The Architecture of Incarceration: Can Design Affect the Prison System?, Pelican Bay State Prison © Jelson25
Pelican Bay State Prison © Jelson25

On July 9th, 30,000 prison inmates across California took part in a hunger strike to show solidarity with those incarcerated in Pelican Bay State Prison, a 'Solitary Housing Unit' in which prisoners are incarcerated - some supposedly for years at a time - in solitary confinement.

Architects/Designers/Planners for Social Responsibility (ADPSR) and its founder Raphael Sperry have made it their mission to make sure that architects are not complicit in designing prisons, even going so far as to form a petition asking the AIA to forbid members from designing execution chambers, 'supermax' prison facilities or solitary confinement facilities, as part of their statement that “members should uphold human rights in all their professional endeavors.” 

At ArchDaily we have already questioned whether it may actually be beneficial for architects to design prisons, rather than allowing them to be designed by less-trained people who could end up designing a space that is even less humane. Now, an article on Blouin Art Info seems to take a similar position: rather than retreating from the business of prison design altogether, architects should try to encourage prison design that facilitates rehabilitation rather than emphasizing punishment. 

Natural History Museum Proposal / Kengo Kuma & Associates + Erik Møller Arkitekter + JAJA Architects

02:10 - 28 August, 2012
Courtesy of Kengo Kuma & Associates, Erik Møller Arkitekter, JAJA Architects
Courtesy of Kengo Kuma & Associates, Erik Møller Arkitekter, JAJA Architects

The proposal for the Natural History Museum of Denmark, designed by Kengo Kuma & Associates, Erik Møller Arkitekter, and JAJA Architects, focuses on creating a coherent and inseparable experience which mixes the experiences of the conventional museum and the classical garden into a series of remarkable spaces. Its location within the beautiful and historical setting of the city’s botanical garden creates a potential for a museum that is more authentic, more engaging and more open for everyone. More images and architects’ description after the break.